Thoughts on the Readings for the Solemnity of Epiphany (A) 2014

Readings:          Isaiah 60: 1-6          Ephesians 3: 2-3a; 5-6          Matthew 2: 1-12


This weekend we celebrate the Solemnity of the Epiphany.   The word epiphany means a revelation or manifestation.   Today’s Feast celebrates the manifestation/revelation of Christ to the world.   This manifestation is represented by the visit of the magi (The magi were foreigners, not Jews.) from the East to the newborn Christ child.  In our Gospel this weekend, we are told that these foreign visitors said:  “we saw his star at its rising and have come to pay him homage.”   King Herod, though, “called the magi secretly and ascertained from them the time of the star’s appearance.  He sent them to Bethlehem and said ‘Go and search diligently for the child.  When you have found him, bring me word, that I too may go and do him homage.’”   Once the magi found the child, “they opened their treasures and offered him gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh.  And having been warned in a dream not to return to Herod they departed for their country by another way.” 

This story is both well known and important.  Through the centuries, however, details have been added to it that were not part of the original. Thus, if you read the text carefully, you will note that the magi are never identified as males or as “kings,” and their number is never specified (We presume there were three because there were three gifts.)  Additionally, the three “kings” we sing of comes from verbal tradition and not from the scriptures.  

Despite the discrepancies between the text of this Gospel and the details that have accrued to it over the centuries, its message is summed up in our second reading today from the Letter of Saint Paul to the Ephesians:  “the Gentiles are coheirs, members of the same body, and copartners in the promise in Christ Jesus through the Gospel.”  

Our first reading this weekend is taken from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah.  It is the section that Christians believe contains the prophecy of the visit of the magi.  “Caravans of camels shall fill you, dromedaries from Midian and Ephah; all from Sheba shall come bearing gold and frankincense, and proclaiming the praises of the Lord.”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. Does knowing that details have been added to this Gospel change its meaning for you?  
  2. If Jesus is the savior of all people for all time, why do some people want to limit the offer of salvation to a select few? 
  3. Has there been a time when you have experience an “epiphany” of God in your life? 
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