Mass at the Basilica

Formed by God's Grace

Many years ago when I was in my last year of college, I needed a half credit class to complete my requirements for graduation. Now at that time in my academic career I wasn’t looking for anything that would be especially challenging or that would require a lot of work. Having dropped out of college once, I just wanted to graduate. With this as my criterion, I scoured the various half credit classes that were offered, and finally found one I thought met my criterion to a “T”—Pottery. With low expectations, but with great hope that the class would allow me to graduate, I signed up for it. 

As it turned out taking that pottery class was not one of the best decisions I have ever made. I discovered I had even less artistic talent than I had thought. One of the major requirements of the class was that we had to make a variety of different objects. Some of the objects had to be made by hand and some on the pottery wheel. And the objects actually had to be functional and/or decorative. This proved to be somewhat problematic for me. There were, however, two saving graces in the class. The first was that the teacher offered to be available at various times to help those students for whom the word “remedial” was more than apt. The other saving grace was that the art studio was open until 10:00pm so students could come in during the evening hours and work on their projects. I took advantage of both of these things. And ultimately, I was able to fulfill at the requirements for the class, and to my amazement got a B in the class. 

There were a couple things I remember from this experience. The first is that even though something looks easy, that doesn’t necessarily mean that it is. This taught me not to make assumptions, but to check things out thoroughly before jumping in with both feet. Now clearly I don’t always do this, but on more than one occasion it has helped me to avoid making a big mistake.  

The other thing I learned is that when you’re trying to throw a pot on a pottery wheel, a slow and gentle touch is needed. If you try to go too fast, or if you use a heavy hand, the pot doesn’t respond well. The best potters know that a slow and steady touch ultimately will produce the best pot. I suspect this is the reason that the prophet Isaiah referred to God as a Potter. “But now, O LORD, You are our Father, we are the clay, and You our potter; And all of us are the work of Your hand.” (Isaiah 64.8)

In my own life, I have discovered time and again that God never forces God’s grace on me. Rather like a potter bringing a pot to life on a wheel, God—with a slow and steady touch—molds and shapes me with God’s grace. Now, certainly there are times when I am resistant to God’s grace, but at these times, God, like a master Potter, doesn’t force, but rather continues to gently form and shape me that I might become the person God would have me be.  

I am enormously grateful to God for God’s patience and gentle care with me.  And I pray that I might strive to be like clay that is malleable and supple, so that I might respond to God’s gentle touch and be formed into the person God would have me be.  

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