Archives: December 2017

As we walk through Advent, we are invited to prayerfully consider how we prepare for and welcome Jesus into our lives. Looking back on the Christmas story, it is easy to fall into an idealized version of our actions: “If Mary and Joseph past by my door, of course I would have made room for you in my inn, Lord!” But where are those choices in our life today? Where are we closing the door to God in our life and community? 

Each day, we are called to be disciples of Christ. We are called to make choices and act so that God’s love is made known in our world. How is that going? 

The U.S. Catholic Bishops describe a disciple as those who “make a conscious, firm decision, carried out in action, to be followers of Jesus Christ no matter what the cost to themselves.” This definition makes the strong assumption that there will be a cost. We will each experience some disadvantage from living our life as disciples. Where is this most true in your life?

Pope Francis, in The Joy of the Gospel says, “An authentic faith—which is never comfortable or completely personal—always involves a deep desire to change the world, to transmit values, to leave this earth somehow better than we found it” (#183). This gives the challenge of discipleship a profound social dimension. It is impossible to live out one’s faith and not get caught in the web of politics—local or global. We are called to enter this arena, and maneuver it with grace and love. We must not avoid it—personally or collectively. 

In my experience, one of the biggest obstacles to discipleship today is fear. Fear drives division. Division drives exclusion and oppression. Oppression drives violence. 

We can see the challenge of discipleship when we look at some of the hottest issues today. These issues call us to put our faith first—to start and end with a prayer to open our hearts and minds to the love of Christ, and close the door to fear, division, or exclusion. This sounds good, until we get specific.

Issues include: immigration reform, care for the environment, taxes and what Pope Francis calls an “idolatry of money,” health care, globalization and trade, racism, care for the most vulnerable, the seamless garment of life, and on and on. 

As Catholics, at this critical moment in history, we cannot afford to proceed with business as usual. We must ground ourselves in our faith and join with people of goodwill throughout the world to transform society through the Gospel of love. 

God has taken the initiative. God has come to us this Christmas. 

Let us open our lives to the Spirit of love and reconciliation. Let us find a way to talk together and work together on the important issues of our day—to welcome God into our midst and experience the love of Christ transforming our life and community. And yes, we may put ourselves at some disadvantage. After all, we are disciples. 

Gift Deadlines for 2017 Tax Credit 
In order to receive tax-deduction credit for 2017, checks must be postmarked by Sunday, December 31. Online credit card gifts need to be received by midnight on December 31. Online direct debit gifts will not be processed in time, they will be processed January 2.
 
The Basilica offices are closed on Friday, December 29 and Monday, January 1.
 
If you need assistance with a year-end gift:
• December 25-28 contact Char Myhre at 612.317.3498 or cmyhre@mary.org.
• December 29-31 contact Audra Johnson at 612.328.3486 (cell) or ajohnson@mary.org.
Please note:  All gifts intended for 2017 must be received by December 31, 2017 or have an envelope post dated for December; if not, it will be recorded in 2018.
 
Ways to Give
Christmas envelopes in the church
Stock Gift-contact information above

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  http://usccb.org/bible/readings/121717.cfm 

This coming weekend we celebrate the third Sunday of the Season of Advent.   For those old enough to remember, this Sunday was known as Gaudete  (Rejoice!) Sunday, because our time of waiting would soon come to an end 

On this Third Sunday of Advent our Gospel reading is from the Gospel of John and, like last week,  we once again encounter John the Baptist.   In this week’s Gospel, some priests and Levites ask John who is he.  John is clear that he is not the Christ, that he is not Elijah, that he is not a prophet, but rather a “voice crying out in the dessert: Make straight the way of the Lord.”  

I have a friend who likes to say that John’s response is an example of the “grace of place.”   John knew who he was and what he was about.  He didn’t have an inflated sense of himself, nor did he display any false humility.  John knew what he was called to be and to do, and he found God’s grace in this.  

Our first reading this weekend is from the book of the prophet Isaiah.  It shares a similar theme with the Gospel in regard to knowing one’s mission.   At the time it was written, the Jewish people were still in exile in Babylon and the prophet, Isaiah spoke to them about his mission.  He had been anointed and sent “to bring glad tidings to the poor, to heal the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives and release to the prisoners, to announce a year of favor by our God.”   In essence he was called to tell them that their time of captivity would eventually come to an end and that the Lord God would make “justice and peace spring up before all the nations.”  

Our second reading for this weekend is taken from Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians.   In it Paul reminds that early Christian community --- and us --- to “rejoice always, pray without ceasing and to give thanks” so as to be “blameless for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ.”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion

  1. Can you recall a time when you “knew” you were called to do or say something?   Do you remembering experiencing God’s grace at this time?  
  2. In what ways have you prepared the way of the Lord this Advent?   Who or what has prepared the way the way of the Lord for you this Advent.  
  3. How are you called to rejoice this Advent?    

On Sunday December 3 we celebrated the first Sunday in the Incarnation Cycle thus starting a new liturgical year. As every New Year, be that liturgical or other this is a time for new resolutions and new beginnings. The Incarnation Cycle comprises Advent, Christmas and Epiphany ending with the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord.

Advent comes from Adventus Domini, Latin for the “coming of the Lord.” Thus Advent is the season of preparation for the coming of the Lord. Often, this is understood to refer to the first coming of Jesus, meaning his birth. However, Adventus Domini refers not only to the advent of the Lord in the past, but also his presence today, and especially his appearance at the end of time. The season of Advent, therefore is a season filled with anticipation, not just for the commemoration of the birth of Jesus but also anticipation of current, future and final manifestations of Christ in our midst. Admittedly, the current manifestations are the most challenging. Our new sculpture of the Homeless Jesus is a true witness to that.

Christmas of course is the heart of the celebration of the Incarnation. The Word Christmas is derived from the Old English Cristes Maesse which means the Celebration of Christ or Christ’s feast. This implies that at Christmas we celebrate the mystery of Christ in its fullness, i.e. his birth, life, death and resurrection. Some Icons place the baby Jesus in a small sarcophagus inviting the beholder to contemplate the mystery that this little child brought salvation to the world.

The Solemnity of the Epiphany marks the last Sunday of this year’s Christmas Season. The word Epiphany is the English translation of the Greek epiphaneia, meaning appearance or manifestation. Three of the great moments of said revelation are the visitation by the Magi, the Baptism of the Lord and the Wedding at Cana when Jesus performed his first miracle. On this feast of the Epiphany, we celebrate how Jesus’ was revealed as The Christ in the past and how he continues to be revealed to us in the present.

This year, the Incarnation Season ends on January 8 with the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, one of the above mentioned manifestations of Jesus as the Christ. 

The next day we will return our crèches to their bins and place the Advent wreaths and Christmas trees on the curb with a mix of sadness and relief. Let us encourage one another though to keep the enthusiasm and joy at the birth of Jesus and his manifestation as The Christ alive in our hearts and in our communities. 

Even more importantly, let us commit ourselves to be the hearts and hands of The Christ in the world today revealing his message of love and compassion to all. This message is very much needed in our world today. Instead of being agents of anger, hatred and division let us be angels of love, hope and peace. After all that is the message of Christmas and it is our message.

Have a blessed Advent and Christmas! 

The Basilica of Saint Mary proudly releases BASILICA Magazine, Fall 2017: The Basilica Community, Our history and our future.

Thank you to the volunteer Magazine team for their dedication creating this issue. 
Melissa Streit, Carol Evans, Rita Nagan, Elyse Rethlake

www.mary.org/sites/default/files/assets/files/2415-2482-basilica-magazine-fall-2017.pdf

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside this issue

Ascension: A Shelter from the Storms of Life
by Margaret Nelson Brinkhaus

Kristian Mauel Nguyen’s Next Milestone 
Building a passion for The Basilica
by Steve Rudolph

Joint Catholic-Lutheran Commemoration of the Reformation
The 500th Anniversary: 1517-2017
by Dirk G. Lange

Reflections on the 500th Anniversary of the Reformation
Local faith leaders share their perspectives
Introduction by Johan M.J. van Parys, Ph. D.

Welcoming Dr. Sharon Pierce
Leading collaboration in our community
by Janice Andersen

Come As You Are 
Creating connections through Pathways Ministry 
by Elyse Rethlake

Hearing Jesus’ Call
Basilica Young Adults - faith, fun, and service
by Melissa Streit

The Life of a Swiss Guard
Vatican Museums exhibit stops in Minneapolis
by Johan M.J. van Parys, Ph. D. 

Innovative Gifts
Reflecting what matters most in life
by Peggy Jennings and Monica Stuart

The Basilica Block Party and Landmark Ball: Captured in images
by Mae Desaire

The award-winning BASILICA magazine is sponsored by The Basilica Landmark, a 501(c)(3) corporation whose mission is the preservation and restoration of the historic Basilica of Saint Mary and it campus. BASILICA is published twice a year (spring and fall) with a circulation of 20,000. 

For advertising information please contact Peggy Jennings.

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. http://usccb.org/bible/readings/121017.cfm 

In our Gospel for the Second Sunday of Advent, we encounter the figure of John the Baptist.  (We will also hear about John the Baptist next Sunday.)   We are told that “John was clothed in camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist.  He fed on locusts and wild honey.”  John’s mission was simple.  He came to prepare the way of the Lord.  

Now certainly it would be difficult to say that John was a “handsome figure.”  Camel’s hair and leather are not fashion statements.   And a steady diet of locusts and wild honey can’t have been appealing.   And yet we are told that “the whole Judean countryside and all the inhabitants of Jerusalem were going out to him.”   What could have attracted them?   I suspect it was the force of his personality and the power of his message.   He proclaimed “a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins.”   

While I have never met a “great” sinner, I have met lots of people who (like me) need to repent of particular sins, as well as entrenched patterns of sinfulness.   Because of this, I need to hear the Baptist’s message.   And when I hear and heed this message, I understand anew the meaning of and need for the season of Advent.

If you have ever heard Handel’s Messiah our first reading for this weekend will be very familiar.  It begins:  “Comfort, give comfort to my people.”   It is taken from that part of the book of Isaiah referred to as the Book of Consolation.   It was intended to console Israel as their time of exile was coming to an end. 

Our second reading for this weekend is taken from the second Letter of St. Peter.   It reminds us clearly that God’s time is not our time and that God does not operate on a human timetable. 

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. During this season of Advent, who or what is calling you to prepare the way and repent of your sins?   How are you called to do this?   
  2. Sometimes messengers --- like John the Baptist --- come in unlikely guises.    Who has been a “messenger” of God for you?   In what unlikely guise did they appear?  What was their message?  Were you consoled or challenged by this message?   
  3. In retrospect, can you think of an instance when God’s time was not your time?