Fr. Bauer's Blog

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/070917.cfm   

When I was growing up in Anoka, above the sanctuary in old St. Stephen’s Church were the words:  “Come to Me all you who are weary and burdened, and I will give you rest.”   As a small child I remember reading those words week after week and thinking “What a wonderful God we must have who will give us rest when we are weary.”   As an adult I have come to know the truth of those words on occasions too numerous to mention.  When we are weary or feeling burdened, God gives us the grace we need to carry on and not to give up or give in.  

In our Gospel this weekend, though, not only does Jesus offer us rest in our weariness, he also invites us to “Take my yoke upon you and learn from me ……………….. For my yoke is easy and my burden light.”   According to Miriam Webster’s Dictionary, a yoke is a wooden bar or frame by which two animals are joined at the heads or necks for working together.  What this suggests to me that when Jesus invites us to take his yoke upon us it means that he will work with us to help us carry what ever burden we are called to carry.   I find this thought very comforting.  

Our first reading this weekend is from the Book of the Prophet Zechariah.   In it Zechariah prophesized that the King will return to Jerusalem and that the “warrior’s bow shall be banished, and he shall proclaim peace to the nations.”   We believe this prophecy was fulfilled in Jesus who is meek and humble of heart.   

Our second reading this weekend is taken from the Letter of St. Paul to the Romans.   In it we are reminded that “If the Spirit of the one who raised Jesus from the dead dwells in you, the one who raised Christ from the dead will give life to your mortal bodies also, through his Spirit that dwells in you.” 

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:  

  1. Have you ever felt Christ giving you rest?   How would you describe the experience?
  2. Can you recall a time when you have taken on Christ’s yoke?  Did you feel Christ’s grace helping you to carry a burden? 
  3. When have you felt the Spirit dwelling in you?  

For this Sunday’s readings, click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/070217.cfm 

Many years ago when I was in college, one of the books I had to read for a class was “The Cost of Discipleship” by Dietrich Bonhoeffer.   In the book Bonhoeffer argued that in many ways Christianity had become secularized, accommodating the demands of following Jesus to the requirements of society. In doing this, he argued, the Gospel had been cheapened, and following Christ had become easy and without pain.  And while following Christ doesn’t mean that our lives will be full of difficulty and pain, Bonhoeffer argued that there will be times when being a disciple asks something of us that we may not want to do.   There is a cost to discipleship.    

I thought of Bonhoeffer’s book when I read our Gospel for this Sunday.   In the opening lines of that Gospel Jesus is clear that being his disciple means loving him above all, and then taking up our cross and following him.   Jesus is also clear in the second half of today’s Gospel, that while following him may involve some pain or difficulty, we will also be rewarded.  Jesus does not promise, though, that the reward will occur in this life.    

Our first reading for this Sunday is taken from the second Book of Kings.   We are told that whenever Elisha came to the town of Shunem, a woman of that town offered him hospitality. Because of her kindness and hospitality Elisha asked his servant, Gehazi if he could do something for her.  His servant told him that she had no son, and her husband was getting on in years.   Elisha then promised the woman: “This time next year you will be fondling a baby son.”   

For our second reading this Sunday we continue to read from the letter of Saint Paul to the Romans. In the section we read today Paul reminds us:  “Are you unaware that we who were baptized into Christ Jesus were baptized into his death? ………. so that just as Christ was raised from the dead by the glory of the Father, we too might live in newness of life.”  

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. When have you experienced a “cost” in following Christ?
  2. Like the Shunemite woman, it would be nice if we were rewarded in this life for our good acts. Unfortunately, most often that is not the case.    What helps you believe that we will see the reward of our goodness in the life to come?  
  3. What does it mean to live in the “newness” of Christ’s life?  

Faith and Action

It seems to me that in our world today there are often two competing visions of “Christianity.” On the one hand there are those who see Christianity as a set of beliefs and rules that believers are expected to accept and adhere to in order to live a good and righteous life, and so be fit for heaven (this is known as orthodoxy). On the other hand there are those who see Christianity simply as a loving way of life, in which we are called to live in common care and concern for one another (this is often referred to as ortho-praxy). 

I think both of these visions, in and of themselves, are incomplete. It is not enough simply to give allegiance to a set of beliefs and rules. Somehow what we believe must have an impact on and find expression in the way we live. Likewise, while it is good and important to manifest a loving way of life, our lives must be grounded in faith, and in a set of beliefs. Without this anchor, it is too easy for a “loving way of life” to become whatever suits one’s fancy at a given moment in time. 

Now certainly the above is not a new issue. It has been around since the beginning of the Church. In the letter of Saint James we read: “What good is it, my brothers, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can that faith save him? If a brother or sister has nothing to wear and has no food for the day, and one of you says to them, ‘Go in peace, keep warm, and eat well,’ but you do not give them the necessities of the body, what good is it? So also faith of itself, if it does not have works, is dead. Indeed someone may say, ‘You have faith and I have works.’ Demonstrate your faith to me without works, and I will demonstrate my faith to you from my works” (James 2: 15-18).

When we talk about a vision for Christianity in general and Catholicism in particular we need a both/and, not an either/or approach. It is too simple to profess a set of beliefs without giving witness to those beliefs in the way we live. I have encountered too many people who were steadfast in the profession of their beliefs, but who were cranky, judgmental, and in some cases, downright mean. On the other hand, I have also encountered people who identified themselves as Christians, and who lived good and loving lives, but who, when pressed, couldn’t tell you exactly what they believed and/or why their beliefs made a difference in the way they lived. 

Both orthodoxy and ortho-praxy are good, important, and necessary. We need to remember, though, that they go together. They are inseparable from one another. Whenever we overemphasize one, or worse, pit them against one another, we are going down a dangerous path. Jesus knew this. I think that is why, when he was asked which was the greatest commandment, he gave two and yoked them together. Christianity in general and Catholicism in particular require that we believe and profess our faith, and then give witness to it through our words and actions. This is what Jesus asks of and expects from all of us. 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/062517.cfm

This weekend we celebrate the 12th Sunday in Ordinary Time.  (Ordinary Time is that time between the major seasons of our Church year --- Advent/Christmas and Lent/Easter.)  In our Gospel this Sunday, Jesus instructs “the twelve” about their mission and ministry.   There are three things to note in this Gospel.  1.  Three times Jesus tells the twelve not to be afraid.  2. Rather, they are to be bold in their witness and fearless in their preaching. 3. For “even the hairs of your head are counted.”      

Jesus knew that his disciples would face stiff resistance and even persecution as they sought to continue his mission and ministry.   Given this, he wanted to be honest with them in regard to what was to come, while at the same time assuring them, that they would not be alone as they went forth.  God would be with them 

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of the Prophet Jeremiah.  In the section we read today, Jeremiah has been imprisoned and beaten.   He hears “the whisperings of many; “Terror on every side!  Denounce! Let us denounce him”   And yet, even in this terrible situation Jeremiah is able to say:  “But the Lord is with me, like a mighty champion: my persecutors will stumble, they will not triumph.  In their failure they will be put to utter shame, to lasting, unforgettable confusion.”   

In both our Gospel and our first Reading we are reminded that God never promised us a trouble free life of ease and comfort.   God did promise, though, that He would be with us in the midst of our trials and sufferings.  

Our second reading today is from the Letter of Saint Paul to the Romans.   In the section we read today Paul reminds us that although sin is a part of our world, “how much more did the grace of God and the gracious gift of the one man Jesus Christ overflow for the many.” 

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:  

  1. When have you experienced God’s grace in the face of difficulties or trials?
  2. During difficulties, has there been a time when --- only in retrospect --- that you were able to see God’s grace in your life? 
  3. Where are you called to give witness to God in your life? 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/061817.cfm 

Many years ago when I was growing up, my mother decided she would bake bread and rolls for our family rather then purchase them at the store.   This practice stopped when my youngest brother was born.  I think with 7 children, one of them being a new born, something had to give.  For a few years, though, it was great to wake up to the smell of fresh bread a couple times a week.  Even as a child, I knew that making bread was a way for my mother to express her love for us.    Given this, it wasn’t difficult at all for me to understand that the Eucharist --- the Bread of Life --- was an expression of Christ’s love for us.   

I mention the above because this Sunday we celebrate the Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ.    This feast celebrates our belief, as Catholics, that in the Eucharist Jesus Christ is really and truly present.    We offer no proof for this belief.  There is no rational explanation for it.  There is no way to logically reason to it.  For us it is a matter of faith.   And, as we read in the Letter to the Hebrews: “Faith is the realization of what is hoped for and evidence of things not seen.”  (Heb. 11.1) 

In our Gospel this weekend, Jesus tells the people:  “I am the living bread that came down from heaven; whoever eats this bread will live forever; and the bread that I will give is my flesh for the life of the world.”   In these words we believe Jesus has promised to be with his people in the Eucharist that we celebrate and share in his name.   Further, we believe that in the Eucharist not only do we share in Christ’s life in this world, but also we are given the promise of eternal life.

Our first reading this weekend is taken from the book of Deuteronomy.  In it Moses reminded the people not to forget the Lord their God who “fed you in the desert with manna, a food unknown to your fathers.”  We see manna as prefiguring the Eucharist.

Our second reading this weekend is taken from the first Letter of St. Paul to the Corinthians.  In it Paul reminded the people of Corinth that “The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break is it not a participation in the body of Christ?”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. How was the Eucharist explained to you as a child?   How do you understand it now?   
  2. How would you explain the Eucharist to someone who does not come from a Christian background? 
  3. What is your strongest memory of receiving the Eucharist? 

A few months ago I got together for dinner with a friend. During our dinner conversation he told me that on a recent trip to the East coast, he had seen GOD’S truck on the highway. Since I am not one to be easily taken in, I asked him what he meant. He said that while he was driving to the East Coast to visit some relatives and friends, in the distance ahead he saw a truck with the word G O D written in large letters across its back doors. He went on to say that as he got closer to the truck he realized that it wasn’t really GOD’S truck after all. Rather it was a truck with very large lettering that announced: Guaranteed Overnight Delivery. As he told this story we both had a good laugh. I then suggested that he get his eyes checked relatively soon. 

As I reflected on my friend’s encounter with GOD’S truck, it occurred to me that perhaps there was a message in this experience. Specifically, it struck me that for most of us when we pray to God we often expect “Guaranteed Overnight Delivery” in response to our prayers. We expect God to hear our prayers, to understand the wisdom, goodness, and unselfishness behind them, and then to respond to them completely, swiftly, and preferably overnight. The reality is, though, that God doesn’t operate according to our timeline and/or agenda.

 Certainly this can be frustrating and it can cause people to wonder why many times their best and most unselfish prayers go unanswered. In some cases people can begin to wonder if they aren’t saying the right prayers, or if they aren’t praying hard enough, or if they just aren’t holy enough. Sadly, for some people, it can even cause them to give up on prayer all together. 

The reality is, though, that it is fairly presumptuous of us to expect that God’s response to our prayers should take the form of “Guaranteed Overnight Delivery.” God is not under any obligation to respond to our prayers according to our timeline and in exactly the manner we want. This doesn’t mean, though, that God doesn’t respond to our prayers. 

More times than I can count I have realized (most often in retrospect) that God had responded to my prayers, but in ways I hadn’t imagined or in ways I hadn’t been open to at the time. Often times too, instead of doing things for me, I have discovered that God has given me the strength, the courage, ability, and the grace to do something I had been praying and asking God to do. 

God never promised Guaranteed Overnight Delivery in response to our prayers. If we can pray with open hearts and minds, though, and if we can trust and believe that God does indeed hear and respond to our prayers, we will discover that God has responded to our prayers. This response may not occur in the way we had wanted or hoped, but most certainly in the way we need.

For the readings for this Sunday click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/061117.cfm   

Three = One.   Huh?   

This weekend we celebrate the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity.   This Feast celebrates the ONE God who has revealed God’s Self as Creating Father, Redeeming Son, and Sanctifying Spirit.    The Preface for this feast (The Preface is that part of the Mass that leads into the Holy, Holy, Holy.) declares:  “For what you have revealed to us of  your glory we believe equally of your  Son and of the Holy Spirit.”  

Our readings this Sunday speak of the relationship of humans with God, beginning with the Israelite people.   In the first reading from the book of Exodus, Moses on Mount Sinai encounters God.   We are told that God passed before him and cried out:  "The Lord, the Lord, a merciful and gracious God, slow to anger and rich in kindess and fidelity."  

In our second reading this weekend, from the letter to the Corinthians,  Paul states our Trinitarian belief succinctly: “The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God , and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with all of you."   

Finally in our Gospel reading we are reminded that “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might  not perish, but might have eternal life."   

All three of our readings for this Feast remind us that the God we worship today is the same God who chose the Israelites, who was fully revealed to us by Jesus Christ, and who continues to abide with each of us and with our Church today.   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. I think sometimes the Trinity is perhaps best grasped through analogy, rather than through theological language.   So think of your mother.   To you she is mother; to her mother she is/was daughter; to her husband she is/was wife.   She is one and the same person, yet viewed in different ways at different times.    What analogy has helped (or still helps) you to understand the Trinity?
  2. We often use words to describe the different Persons in the Godhead.  What words would you use to help distinguish the different Persons in the Triune Godhead?    Hint:  some people use Creator, Redeemer and Sanctifier.  
  3. What do you think is the biggest stumbling block to belief in a Triune God? 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/060417-day-mass.cfm 

This Sunday we celebrate the Solemnity of Pentecost.  Along with Christmas and Easter, Pentecost  is really the third great Feast of our Church year.  Unfortunately, coming as it does at the beginning of summer, Pentecost doesn’t get nearly the attention that Christmas and Easter do.   And yet Pentecost, because it celebrates the gift of the Holy Spirit and the birth of the Church, is very important.   

If we are honest, I think another reason why Pentecost doesn’t get the attention it deserves is that the Holy Spirit is the least understood member of the Trinity.   In fact, when I was growing up the Holy Spirit was referred to as the Holy Ghost.   And if you think understanding the Holy Spirit is difficult, you can only imagine what it was like for a teacher to explain the Holy Ghost.   And yet, the work of the Spirit is experienced in a variety of ways both in our Church and in our individual lives.   In this regard some of the words we use to speak of the work the Spirit are:  Animator, Counselor, Advocate, Guide, and Comforter.   We also speak of the 7 Gifts of the Holy Spirit and the 12 Fruits of the Holy Spirit.   While we may not have the precise clarity of understanding we would like in regard to the Holy Spirit, what is clear is that the work of the Holy Spirit is essential to our Church and our individual lives.  

Our readings for this weekend speak clearly of the work of the Spirit.   Our first reading from the Acts of the Apostles tells us of the very first Pentecost.    The gift of tongues, so that all people could hear of the “mighty acts of God” in their own language, reverses the “babel” that resulted when the people in Genesis tried to build a tower to the heavens.   The Gospel reading recounts the gift of the Holy Spirit to the first disciples.   And the Second reading from Corinthians reminds us that there are “different kinds of spiritual gifts, but the same Spirit.”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. How would you describe the Holy Spirit to someone who didn’t come from a Christian background?
  2. How have you felt the Spirit working in your life?
  3. What gifts of the Spirit have you been given?

In a few weeks, from June 18 - June 22, the priests of our Archdiocese will gather at the Kahler Hotel in Rochester for our biennial Presbyteral Assembly. Every other year, for many years now our Archbishops have asked the priests of our Archdiocese to set aside their parish or institutional responsibilities and gather together for a few days to talk about some specific areas of our lives/ministries. This year the various speakers will focus on the Spirituality of the Diocesan Priesthood; Priestly Fraternity; and Affective Maturity. (I’m not at all sure what that last topic means.)

These gatherings are good and important. As priests, we gather in all our diversity and with all our differences, and spend time together in fraternity. During our time together we are well aware of the things that unite us as well as those things about which we disagree. And often times the things about which we disagree are brought up in very public ways. In fact, in the years I have been attending these assemblies, I have often been reminded of an old Phyllis Diller line from many years ago: “Never go to bed angry. Stay up and fight.”

We priests are very much like most other Catholics. We don’t always agree with each other. In fact, if the truth be told, we differ; we disagree; and sometimes we argue. But through it all we stay together. We don’t walk away from each other. I believe the reason for this is that we realize that, at root, the things that unite us are more important than the things that might divide us.

Disagreement and tension have always been a part of the life of our Church. In the Acts of the Apostles, Paul fought with Peter over the issue of Gentile converts. Moreover, through the centuries, disagreement and dissension have been part of more than one Council and/or Conclave. Yet through it all our Church not only has survived; it has thrived. I think the reason for this is twofold.

First, we believe that the Spirit of God has guided and continues to guide our Church. And with the guidance of the Spirit comes the promise and gift of Indefectibility. The gift of Indefectibility tells us that because the Holy Spirit leads and guides our Church, the Church cannot and will not deviate fundamentally from the truth of the Gospel, from the Mission of the Church, or from the Life of Faith. The guidance of the Holy Spirit ensures that despite disagreements that might arise, despite any appearance of division, our Church cannot deviate in fundamental and essential ways from the Gospel, the Mission that Christ entrusted to it, or from the Life of Faith.

The second thing that has ensured that our Church has thrived through the centuries is the grace of God poured out on the Church as a whole, and upon each individual member. I am more and more convinced that God’s grace has enabled and continues to enable us to identify, to discuss, to work through, and/or accept the differences and disagreements that exist within our Church. It is the grace of God that allows us to see beyond the differences that would divide us, to the many and foundational things that unite us. Our Church, both locally, as well as internationally, is very diverse. But diversity does not necessarily need to lead to division. Nor does diversity mean that we can’t stand on the common ground that is foundational for us and that ultimately unites us with God.

“Big God, Big Church” is a phrase that is really a mantra for me. It reminds me that the embrace of our Church cannot be anything less that the embrace of our God’s love. Occasionally all of us—even priests—need to be reminded of this fact. The things that unite us are far more important than the things about which we might differ or disagree. The challenge for all of us is to rely a little more on God’s grace and the guidance of the Holy Spirit, and a little less on our own ideas and biases. As followers of the Lord Jesus this must always be our hope and our goal.

 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser: https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/052817-ascension.cfm   

This weekend we celebrate the Solemnity of the Ascension of Jesus into heaven.   When I was pastor of a parish with a school I loved celebrating Mass with children on this day.   After the Gospel I would stand in front of the altar and stare up at the ceiling.  Within a few seconds every child in the place would also be staring at the ceiling.   After about a minute of this, I would tell them that they were dong the exactly the same thing Jesus’ disciples did when Jesus ascended into heaven.   

We read of Jesus’ Ascension in our first reading this weekend which is taken from the Acts of the Apostles.  In that reading we are told that when Jesus gathered with his disciples for the last time after his resurrection he told them: “When the Holy Spirit comes upon you, you will be my witnesses in Jerusalem, throughout Judea and Samaria, and to the ends of the earth.’  When he had said this, as they were looking on, he was lifted up, and a cloud took him from their sight.  While they were looking intently at the sky as he was going, suddenly two men dressed in white garments stood beside them.  They said ‘Men of Galilee, why are you standing there looking at the sky?’ This Jesus who has been taken up from you into heaven will return in the same way as you have seen him going into heaven.”   

Our Gospel reading this weekend contains the final verses of Matthew’s Gospel.  In it Jesus commands his disciples to “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit………”  Jesus also reminded his disciples, that “behold, I am with you always, until the end of the age.”   

Our second reading this weekend is taken from the Letter of Saint Paul to the Ephesians.   In it Paul prays that the “eyes of your hearts be enlightened, that you may know what is the hope that belongs to his call, what are the riches of glory in his inheritance among the holy ones, and what is the surpassing greatness of his power for us who believe.”  

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. Sometimes I am like the disciples.  I stare off into the heavens looking for Jesus, and forget his promise to be with us always, until the end of the age.   Is this true for you as well? 
  2. How are you called to give witness to Jesus in your life?
  3. How would you explain to someone our belief that Christ is both in heaven and yet with us here on earth?   

Pages