A picture of a solid stone cross in front of a clear blue sky.

Weekly Musings

Not expecting it to be so, this summer has been all over the map with regards to events taking place one after another. It felt like there was breaking news every other day around weather issues throughout the country, terrorist attacks around the world, the ramping up of the upcoming election year, and then there has been so much happening in our worldwide church as well as in our local church. Often I felt myself wanting to withdraw from the ugliness of the news, to crawl back into my personal space or run away to a desert island without any technology whatsoever. To disengage from everyone and everything around me would have been a luxury. 

I found myself fighting off depression and hopelessness some days. And some days I cried out to God, “What is happening in YOUR world?” And God turned right around and asked, “What is happening in YOURS?”

A friend and I had a conversation the other evening about how difficult life can be, wondering how to maneuver through it gracefully, tactfully, and with hope and faith. She stated that the world is very dark and, without faith and hope, the darkness remains. She was lamenting the fact that her growth in spirituality and Christian action was too slow as far as she was concerned. She wondered if she would ever “get it.” I hated to admit it but I, too, have wondered that myself many times. I would like the path to holiness to be straight and on target but that is so not the case. Many twists and turns have always been in the way, or so it seemed. 

It has taken me many years to appreciate all those things that have sidetracked me on my journey. To realize that those very things are the journey itself. Every experience, every person, every event has become my life. They have all come together to help create the person I am today. It is my story and it is unique. Just as yours is. And only by God’s intimate grace, have I come to know God in my story and recognized God in your stories as well. That’s how it works. We live out our story and become immersed in everyone else’s story. And that’s where we find God…in each other’s stories. 

So, to reflect on God’s question to me, “What is happening in Yours?” puts a new spin on this situation. In other words, what am I doing about the poverty, oppression, tragedies, hopelessness, and faithlessness around me? How am I bringing God into our world to make a difference? What have I done for the ones who are in need around me? Was I present to each and every person I met this day? Did I live well today? How have I detached from this world and all its false idols? Do I have any regrets about my day? What would I do differently and better the next time? Have I been selfless today? Have I died to self in some small way today? 

There is a quotation I found somewhere a while back. I wish I could give credit to someone for it but I am not sure who is the author.  “Live in such a way that those who know you, but don't know God, will come to know God because they know you.”

I found this quotation to be very profound and a definite call in my own life. The truth is I cannot live like this on my own. It is only through the Holy Spirit that I am able to try to achieve this. But I have seen God do powerful things with or without me. It does go smoother, I think, if I cooperate with God’s grace. But knowing myself, I don’t always go with the flow. And God knows that about me too. I am grateful that God is patient and understanding because I am a slow learner.

So we come upon another year of beginnings as we move into the season of dying and death—Fall. The season that is so necessary before we can ever get to resurrection. This challenge lies before all of us to live with a difference for others who need God so desperately in our world today. 

 

God Is With Us

In July 2013, Pope Francis gave a homily highlighting three “simple” attitudes: hopefulness, openness to being surprised by God, and living in joy. Recognizing that difficulties are present in the life of every individual and all communities, we are invited to kindle these three attitudes in life.

Hopefulness: “In the face of those moments of discouragement we experience in life… I would like to say forcefully: always know in your heart that God is by your side; he never abandons you! Let us never lose hope! The ‘dragon,’ evil, is present in our history, but it does not have the upper hand. The one with the upper hand is God, and God is our hope!”  
We are invited and challenged to identify the ways we are drawn away from trust and hope, and to let go of our need for control. There are times in each of our lives that we become discouraged. There are experiences that challenge us all. Let us recognize these experiences and moments, and remember that we do not have to deal with them alone. God gives us what and who we need, when we need it. God is with us.

Openness to being surprised by God: “Anyone who is a man or woman of hope…knows that even in the midst of difficulties God acts and surprises us….But he asks us to let ourselves be surprised by his love, to accept his surprises. Let us trust God!” 

We are invited and challenged to find ways to continually draw nearer to our God, to nurture and deepen our relationship with God as individuals and as a community. Once again, we are asked to let go of our need for control—to yield to the ever present goodness of God. Ultimately, we are asked to accept the incredible reality that we are God’s beloved, and God cares deeply for us. 
The simplicity of this request belies the challenge often experienced in living it out. It is amazing how many ways we find to doubt our own goodness or the goodness of another. There seems like endless ways we build walls between ourselves and God, between ourselves and our neighbor. So often, we place our trust in material and worldly powers—actively creating facades of protection that separate our selves from God’s reconciling and healing love. God is with us, and will surprise us—if we trust and open our eyes to see. 

Living in joy: “If we walk in hope, allowing ourselves to be surprised by the new life that Jesus offers us, we have joy in our hearts, and we cannot fail to be witnesses of this joy…If we are truly in love with Christ and if we sense how much he loves us, our heart will ‘lighten up’ with a joy that spreads to everyone around us.” 
We are invited and challenged to accept the profound gift of God’s love in our day-to-day life and embrace joy. As a spiritual discipline, joy is a powerful attitude that goes beyond the familiar experience of being happy. Our faith is full of sacred stories of people who have experienced deep trials and tribulations, yet emit joy. We may know people in our lives who have many struggles and hardships, yet radiate a deep joy. The joy appears to come from someplace deep—beyond the realities we can see. It is not simply a happiness. Perhaps we have had glimpses of this in our lives, as well. Once again, we are invited to let go of control—finding ways to choose joy, and let go of fear, resentment, or an attitude of competitive scarcity.

Our invitation and our challenge is to live a faithful life that puts our hope in God, recognizes the daily gifts of God’s love, and thereby finding joy amid the realities of everyday life. 

What do you need to grow in these three simple, yet profound, attitudes? How does The Basilica community support you in your growth? How do you support others? As we live as people of God, rooting our hopes and expectations in our faith, let us focus our lives on these attitudes and grow in love together. 

 

A while back, I started praying the rosary again. Now, I never really abandoned the rosary, I just didn’t pray it on a regular basis. What got me started again, though, was my driving. Recently, I noticed that when I was driving, my irritation with other drivers had begun to move more toward anger. When I realized this, I decided I needed to do something about it. I tried turning off the radio and reciting some scripture verses, but after a few minutes, I found my attention wandering, and I was right back to criticizing other drivers. So, I decided to go back to the tried and true and started saying the rosary. And lo and behold, it has helped.

Now I’d like to tell you that my irritation level while driving has been reduced to zero, but that hasn’t happened. I still get irritated with other drivers, but when that happens I say the next Hail Mary for whatever driver irritated me. And when I do that, I can feel my irritation slipping away.

There is something about the cadence of the rosary that is soothing to my mind and my soul. I don’t have to think, I just have to let the Hail Mary’s, Glory Be’s, and Our Father’s carry me. As the beads slip gently through my fingers and I feel the soft weight of the rosary in my hand, I experience a definite comfort and a sense of peace. What is especially appealing about the rosary for me, though, is its portability. You can pray the rosary anywhere and at any time. And if push comes to shove, and you don’t have a rosary handy, you can always use your fingers to count the Hail Mary’s. The only problem I have is that I get the Joyful, Glorious and the Luminous mysteries confused. So, for now, I am using just the Sorrowful mysteries.

Now, like most forms of prayer, the rosary has some strong advocates and promoters, as well as some critics. My grandmother Degnan was a great advocate of the rosary. She prayed the rosary daily for her grandchildren. And if we were experiencing any difficulties, she doubled her efforts on our behalf. I know I was the recipient of untold decades of the rosary during my college years. As an added bonus—from my grandmother’s perspective—the rosary was a great non-medicinal aid to sleep. She would start a rosary when she went to bed, and invariably she would fall asleep with the rosary in her hand. And if she woke up in the night, as she often did, she would pick up saying the rosary right where she left off.

The rosary is a great form of prayer for some people, but I realize it is not for everyone. The important thing, though, is not how we pray, but that we pray. Prayer helps us to lift our minds and hearts to God and open ourselves to God’s will and work in our lives. Prayer can comfort us, challenge us, guide us, inspire us, enlighten us, and empower us. It can help decrease our stress levels, reduce our tension, and—while driving—can even calm our irritation or anger.

As prime travel season is upon us, I am reminded of a trip I took many years ago to Santiago de Compostella in Spain. Santiago is Spanish for Saint James, one of the 12 disciples. Compostella is a derivation of the Latin: Campus Stellae or ‘field of stars.’ The origin of the name for Santiago de Compostella goes back to the middle ages. Legend has it that after his death, the disciples of St. James brought his body to Spain for burial. When the location of his burial site was lost to history, some shepherds noticed strange lights or stars in a field. Upon further investigation they discovered that the stars pointed to the place of burial of St. James. A church was erected over his tomb. As the news of the miraculous discovery and the many miracles worked there spread throughout Europe, Santiago de Compostella quickly became an important place of pilgrimage and the original church was replaced with the current monumental Cathedral. 

During the Middle Ages, people made their way to Compostella from all over Europe. Dozens quickly became hundreds and hundreds became thousands. Pilgrims came from Italy, France, Northern Europe and the British Isles. Soon, paths were formed like walking trails in forests. Those paths became the official route to take and refuges and churches were built along the road. These were mostly tended by religious communities who provided pilgrims with food, water, rest, and spiritual care if needed.

A pilgrim coming from Great Britain started out by walking to the crossing at Dover. Once in France, he or she picked up the French pilgrims’ way, which went to the French-Spanish border in the Pyrenees. There the pilgrim connected with the Spanish portion of the route. These pilgrimages could take many months depending on one’s place of departure. Regardless of its length, the journey was never easy. Bad weather, hunger, sickness, and burglary were all part of the course. It took extraordinary dedication or even an ecclesiastical obligation such as a penance for committed sins to go on this kind of pilgrimage.

Today the pilgrimage is popular, again. True pilgrims still walk to Santiago. And though the circumstances are better, bad weather, occasional hunger, thirst, sleeplessness, illness, and even burglary make the journey very real. Less dedicated pilgrims may take to riding a horse or a bike, driving a car, riding in a bus or even taking the plane. I am sad to say that we took the easy route and rode in a luxury coach. Yet regardless of one’s mode of transportation, everyone’s goal is to make it to Compostella—the Field of Stars. 

This pilgrimage is a metaphor for our entire Christian journey. Some of us get to Compostella, the place of light, with the speed of an airplane, maybe even sitting in first class seats. Others take a slower, yet still direct route to Compostella. And some are rather circuitous about their journey. They may start in England, make it to France, take a detour through Italy and finally arrive at the gates of Compostella.
Similarly, our journey to oneness with Christ may take a long time and a less than direct path. Others take a more direct and quicker route. We all make this journey on our own terms and according to our own spiritual compass, though we share the same goal: getting to the field of stars; touching the light; becoming one with Christ. 

Most of us will never make the trip to Compostella, but many of us have our own Compostella, our own field of stars, our own place of pilgrimage. For Minnesotans this is often a favorite place by a lake or in the woods where we can find rest and peace and reconnect with God and one another. Should you find yourself there on a rainy day and wanting to watch a movie I recommend “The Way.” This film tells the story of Santiago de Compostella beautifully. It also speaks to the journey each one of us is taking. May this summer’s journey bring renewal of body, mind, and soul to all of us.

 

Welcome to The Basilica of Saint Mary. You may be here weekly, even daily, or maybe you haven’t visited in years, or perhaps you are visiting for the first time today. Regardless of your history, I hope you take the time to look around and appreciate the gift that surrounds us.

Just imagine, in our lifetime a decision had to be made to save the Basilica.

The Basilica Landmark was founded as an independent, non-profit organization in 1993 by a group of forward-thinking volunteers who knew the community would care about this building. It was not only for the congregation, or even Catholics, but for everyone. Generations of generosity bring us to where we are today.

The Basilica Landmark’s mission is to preserve, restore and advance our historic Basilica and its campus. We call it “The Building of Hope.”

In any given year, hundreds of thousands of visitors walk through these doors for weddings, outreach services, concerts, tours, baptisms, funerals, and of course, for worship. The common thread tying these experiences together is inspiration.

These experiences inspire us to see people, everyone—from those at Mass to those in line for a sandwich. To see each other—really see them—and what is within. This space inspires us to give, not just take. It inspires us to improve our relationships—to love one another. Perhaps it inspires us to be better, to improve our relationships, our community—and in turn, even our world.

This is “The Building of Hope.”

This is a very exciting time for The Basilica Landmark, with so much good happening here on campus. Since 2010, The Basilica Landmark has invested $10 million in our mission. We have funded vital repairs to the interior of the historic Basilica school, restored the original bronze and leather doors, restored the Narthex, Sacristy and stained glass windows, and replaced the original church boiler from 1913. These are just a few of the hundreds of total projects already complete.

Last December, we met a $2.5 million matching challenge gift, making it possible to invest in a number of significant projects planned on our campus over the next few years, including a very significant renovation of the Reardon Rectory going on right now. This will address the limitations we currently face for service and programming growth.

Today, we are a thriving organization, investing more than $2 million each year in our campus. Major projects planned between 2016-2018 include Church tuck-pointing and roofing work, an expansion of the Cowley Center, and tuck-pointing, and a new window installation in the School. For more information on these projects, visit us online at www.thebasilicalandmark.org.

You can feel the momentum on our campus, and the progress paves the way for wonderful things in our future. To make these projects possible, we still need your support, and are thrilled to announce yet another wonderful opportunity to increase the impact of your gift. In 2015, a challenge gift has been made to The Basilica Landmark.  For each new annual fund gift of any size this spring, a $100 donation will be made.  To make a donation, please call 612.317.3455 or email Emily Hjelm.  Thank you so much for your consideration.

In a city where historic architectural treasures have been demolished, The Basilica has held a prominent place on our skyline for more than 100 years. We have been given a very special gift, thanks to the thousands of people who gave generously to have it built and then thousands more gave generously to save it. Today presents our opportunity to participate in our own legacy. Thank you for your consideration and your part in “The Building of Hope.”

 

Dear Archbishop Hebda, Bishop Cozzens and Fr. Lachowitzer:

Archbishop Hebda, I want to welcome you to our Archdiocese as Apostolic Administrator. Please know that you are in my prayers and the prayers of our parish, as you begin this important ministry. I pray it will be a time of healing and new hope for our Archdiocese.

I write this letter with a very troubled heart. During the past two years, at listening sessions and at various meetings, I have heard my parishioners describe feelings of outrage, betrayal, breach of trust, and deep sadness over the manner in which certain events have been handled in our Archdiocese. Very sadly, some people have even chosen to leave the church. The loss of these good people is a wound from which our church will not soon recover.

In recent accounts in various media and most recently in a report last Friday by Madeleine Baron of Minnesota Public Radio, questions have been raised in regard to the manner in which the Archdiocese has shared or not shared important information regarding Archbishop Nienstedt. These reports are concerning on several levels. Most specifically, however, they suggest that the Archdiocese has not been transparent, honest and forthcoming in the information it is has shared with the faithful of the Archdiocese in regard to Archbishop Nienstedt. 

Given the events of the past two years, and most recently the resignations of Archbishop Nienstedt and Bishop Piché, I think it is absolutely imperative that, unless prohibited by law or promise of confidentiality to lay witnesses, the Archdiocese release all information regarding the investigation of Archbishop Nienstedt. I realize objections will be raised in regard to the release of this material. Given the fact that Archdiocesan funds were used, however, I firmly believe that the right of the faithful to this information outweighs any objections. More importantly, I believe that in order for our Archdiocese to rebuild the trust needed for the healing process to begin, full disclosure is essential so that we can move forward with the clear and certain knowledge that nothing has been or is being hidden or concealed.

I request that the release of information specifically needs to include:

  • the report(s) from Greene Espel;
  • the report(s) from Peter Wold;
  • the report(s) to Archbishop Vigano;
  • a full and accurate accounting of costs associated with these reports;
  • a general outline of the financial obligations of the Archdiocese to Archbishop Nienstedt, as defined by canon law and the regulations of the USCCCB.
  • Any additional information necessary to reveal any remaining issues and restore openness between the Archdiocese and parishioners, unless prohibited by law or promise of confidentiality to lay witnesses;

I have shared this letter with our parish leadership and I will also publish it in an upcoming parish bulletin as I have done in previous correspondence with Archbishop Nienstedt and in summaries of various listening sessions. I will do the same with any response you have. I believe that ongoing transparency is both necessary and critical during this time of crisis. It is my firm belief, as I hope it is yours as well, that it is only through this kind of transparency and openness that our Archdiocese will be able to move forward in healing and hope.  

Thank you for your ministry in and to our Archdiocese.  

Sincerely yours in Christ,

John M. Bauer
Pastor, The Basilica of Saint Mary

 

A few weeks ago I was doing some cleaning at my cabin and had the radio on in the background. At one point the theme song from Mission Impossible came on. As I listened I was transported back in time as I remembered watching the show when I was growing up. (Yes, I know there have been several movies based on “Mission Impossible,” but I still like the old television show the best.) I especially liked the words that introduced each episode “Your mission, should you chose to accept it is….” I like the well defined purpose and the clarity of knowing exactly what was expected and what needed to be done. There are many times when I long for that same kind of clarity in regard to God’s will in my life. It would be great if God would clearly tell me, “John, your mission should you chose to accept it is….”

Unfortunately, more often than I care to admit, when I am trying to discern God’s will or what God would have me do in a particular situation, I am much like a boat without a rudder.

I pray, but my prayer is often directionless and without focus. I want clarity and direction, and worse I want it now. In my efforts to get God to tell me what God wants me to do, I am impatient almost to the point of demanding. I don’t like it when I get this way, and I suspect God isn’t too happy with me either. 

When I encounter these times in my life, one of the things that is helpful for me is to remember and take to heart a prayer that Thomas Merton wrote many years ago. I have kept this prayer in my Breviary since I was ordained. And on times too numerous to mention I have found it very comforting. “My Lord God, I have no idea where I am going. I do not see the road ahead of me. I cannot know for certain where it will end. Nor do I really know myself, and the fact that I think that I am following your will does not mean that I am actually doing so. But I believe that the desire to please you does in fact please you. And I hope I have that desire in all that I am doing. I hope that I will never do anything apart from that desire. And I know that if I do this you will lead me by the right road though I may know nothing about it. Therefore will I trust you always though I may seem to be lost and in the shadow of death. I will not fear, for you are ever with me, and you will never leave me to face my perils alone.”

Discerning God’s will for us, or what God would have us do in a particular situation is not always easy. It can be frustrating, time consuming, and even a little annoying. It would be much easier if God simply told us, “Your mission should you chose to accept it is….” Unfortunately, if God were that direct, it would negate our free will. And our free will is one of the things that defines us as human beings and separates us from other creatures.

And so, at those times when I struggle with discerning God’s will, I take heart and find consolation in the prayer of Thomas Merton. The way I figure it, if one of the premier spiritual writers of the 20th century had trouble discerning God’s will, I should probably cut myself a little slack when I experience the same difficulty. I also take comfort in the knowledge that God will never call me to a mission that is impossible, because with God’s grace all things are possible.

In my hometown, Memorial Day signals the start of summer. This year, my mom and I went to the town cemetery to put flowers on our family members’ graves, and on Monday we gathered with the whole town at the courthouse for an Avenue of Flags dedicated to deceased veterans. 


It’s a beautiful memorial and draws hundreds of people who come together to remember their loved ones. With over 1,000 U.S. flags whipping in the wind, a sea of people in lawn chairs listen to the reading of each veterans’ name and mourn with families who have come to dedicate the flags of those who died in the past year. It’s simple, solemn and celebratory. 


Often this remembrance is the first time spent outside seeing friends and neighbors, experiencing the sun, the breeze, and the joy of summer.  


What does the start of summer mean to you? At The Basilica, our parish community explores Personal Stewardship in June and July. I invite you to consider how you care for yourself in mind, body and spirit. Sometimes I find that friends and family concentrate and worry about everyone but themselves. Summer somehow gives us permission to take it a little easier...to go for a walk, smell the roses, or contemplate the feel of the sun after a very long winter.  


The questions of how we care for ourselves and how we re-charge and re-energize probably have unique answers for each of us. For some it’s enjoying sweet fresh fruit and garden-grown vegetables as part of a healthy diet. Others head outdoors for biking, fishing, playing sports, or going for a swim at the lake. Many take summer vacations to break away from routines and the responsibilities of home, work, or both.  
As you consider the importance of Personal Stewardship, I encourage you to remember the words of Saint Teresa of Avila—“Christ has no body now on earth but yours, no hands but yours, no feet but yours....” She challenged us to live our faith and reminded us that it’s our job to do Christ’s work on earth. How can we possibly answer this call unless we first commit to take care of ourselves in mind, body and spirit?  


There are many ways to embrace Personal Stewardship. Just commit to do one thing to renew and recharge yourself this summer. The key is actively, consciously making choices that contribute to your well-being. Consider the nice weather an opportunity to get outside for fun and exercise. Take a stroll through the neighborhood or around the lake. Play tennis or golf. Work in the garden. Go for a bike ride. Summer gives us so many possibilities to get moving and enjoy the outdoors. Or take advantage of the great fresh food offered at your local grocery store or neighborhood farmers market. As we move through summer, see what looks good at the farmers market and experiment with cooking up healthy and nutritious offerings.    


Think about focusing on your prayer life. Worship with us weekly or visit The Basilica in the quiet of the day for contemplation and reflection.  Consider Centering Prayer, a spiritual practice of quieting the mind and meditating in silence. It’s offered twice weekly on Wednesdays from 7:30 – 8:00am, and Fridays from 10:00 – 11:00am in the Bride’s Room located on the Basilica’s ground level. You’ll meet with a small group to discuss a book and then practice Centering Prayer for 20 minutes. Walk the labyrinth on The Basilica’s west lawn, or attend the Mental Health Blessing at all our June 27 and 28 liturgies. 


Please explore Personal Stewardship in June and July and take time to consider the importance of caring for yourself in mind, body and spirit this summer. You’ll find lots of ideas at www.mary.org/personalstewardship.

 

At a consistory on Saturday, February 14, Pope Francis created 20 new Cardinals from around the globe. On Sunday, February 15, Pope Francis presided at Mass with these new Cardinals. As part of his homily at that Mass, Pope Francis addressed the 20 new cardinals in the words below.

Dear new Cardinals, my brothers, as we look to Jesus and our Mother, I urge you to serve the Church in such a way that Christians—edified by our witness—will not be tempted to turn to Jesus without turning to the outcast, to become a closed caste with nothing authentically ecclesial about it. I urge you to serve Jesus crucified in every person who is marginalized, for whatever reason; to see the Lord in every excluded person who is hungry, thirsty, naked; to see the Lord present even in those who have lost their faith, or turned away from the practice of their faith, or say that they are atheists; to see the Lord in who is imprisoned, sick, unemployed, persecuted; to see the Lord in the leper—whether in body or soul—who encounters discrimination! We will not find the Lord unless we truly accept the marginalized! May we always have before us the image of Saint Francis, who was unafraid to embrace the leper and to accept every kind of outcast. Truly, dear brothers, the Gospel of the marginalized is where our credibility is at stake, is discovered and is revealed!

I was and continue to be amazed at the clarity and breadth of Pope Francis’ vision for our church. He is clear that because no one is beyond the reach of God’s love, so too no one can be beyond the reach of our Church. For Pope Francis, reaching out to the marginalized, the outcast, the excluded is not just a good thing to do, it is essential and fundamental to our Church. 

Now clearly, we have not done this well. At times people have sought to restructure the Catholic Church into what they see as a far smaller, simpler and more spiritual entity. I think this is not just unfortunate, but also and more importantly it fails to follow the example of Jesus. In the Gospels, Jesus was always reaching out to those that others referred to as “tax collectors and sinners”—to the people on the margins. And we know that these tax collectors and sinners not only became his followers, but also eventually became those who would continue the mission and ministry of Jesus and bring his message to the world. 

Clearly it is safer and simpler and it certainly takes less effort to try to restrict our Church’s mission only to those who are already “in the corral,” so to speak. I believe, though, that Pope Francis’ has laid before us a profound and exciting challenge. And challenges can be scary. Our Church, and particularly The Basilica, though, will more clearly be the church of Christ when we strive to reach out to the marginalized, the outcast, the excluded. We don’t have to go far to do this, these people are all around us. They are our relatives and friends, our neighbors and co-workers. They are all those who—for whatever reason—feel at a distance from God’s love. Our call and challenge are to welcome and invite them into our community, and share with them the inclusive, universal and unending love of God made visible in Jesus Christ and given expression in our care and concern.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some years ago I was asked to give a tour of The Basilica to a group of lawyers, physicians, reporters and university professors from the Middle East. Most of them were Muslim with the exception of one or two Christians. They had been invited by the State Department to experience our country first-hand. My task was to show them the building and while doing that answer any questions they might have about Christianity. Given the many images and symbols around our building it was rather easy to offer a quick introduction to our catholic faith.

Toward the end of the tour a journalist from Yemen asked me how we could consider ourselves monotheists or believers in one God as we seemingly worshipped three Gods. As fate or better yet, Divine Providence would have it we were standing by the chapel of St. Anthony. Carved in the wall leading to this chapel is a representation of a snake and a clover, the symbolic representation of St. Patrick. The snake refers to the belief that Patrick chased all snakes out of Ireland. The clover was used by Patrick to explain the mystery of the Trinity. Pointing out that a three lobed clover leaf has indeed three lobes but constitutes one leaf he explained that the Holy Trinity is one God but three persons.

I pointed out the carving of the clover in the wall and told the story of St. Patrick. I told them that we have a threefold experience of the one God as Creator, Redeemer and Sanctifier. I spoke of our God we call Father who created all that is. I spoke of our God we know as Son who redeemed us from our sinfulness and death. And I spoke of our God as Spirit who inspires us to live according to the Gospel.

Hesitatingly admitting that on some level this made sense, the journalist then told me of a picture she saw of the Christian God in the form of three men. How was she to deduce that this actually was an image of one God? I asked her if the three men looked alike.” Indeed they did”, she said, “they looked exactly alike”.  There, of course is a reason for that as the three are actually the one and the same.

Nevertheless, the representation of God as three men, more than likely old and long bearded white men does not necessarily enhance the understanding of the Trinity. In the end, God only became human in Jesus Christ. Depicting the other two persons of the Holy Trinity in human terms may be too much of an anthropomorphic approach to the Trinity. This actually may impede the understanding of our God by Christians and non-Christians alike.

The mystery of our Tri-une God is in essence the mystery of an intimate relationship. In the same way as two humans who love one another are one in their love but separate individuals so the persons of the Trinity are one in their relationship but distinct in their personhood.

As our visitors left The Basilica they thanked me profusely for giving them a better understanding of Christianity. The Yemini journalist said nothing, but just smiled. To this day I am not sure what she ended up thinking about our faith. Of course, thinking is probably the wrong verb as it really is all about believing. After all, as the little boy by the sea told St. Augustine, it is no more difficult to move all the water of the ocean using a seashell than it is to comprehend the Holy Trinity.

 

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