Fr. John Bauer

Rector and Pastor
Clergy

Serves on the Parish Council, Finance Committee, Stewardship Council and as a member of The Basilica Landmark Board.  Fr. Bauer led the successful merger of 3 parishes (St.Therese, St. Gregory, St. Leo) to become the new Lumen Christi in St. Paul, and completed their major building expansion.  Former Pastor of St. Therese, Deephaven and Associate at St. Patrick’s in Edina. 

(612) 317-3502

Recent Posts by Fr. John Bauer

Sacred Heart of Jesus statue, Basilica of St. Mary

A Time for Hope

A few months ago while driving to a friend’s cabin, I drove past a couple of houses that had been abandoned, and appeared ready to be demolished. The windows that remained had been broken, the doors had been removed from their hinges, and the grass around the houses was overgrown. It was clear at a glance that those houses would never again be home to anyone. I slowed down as I drove past, hoping to get a sense or an indication of how they had come to such a sorry state, but I quickly realized they were simply empty and abandoned, with no indication of why. They certainly had a past, but there was no future for them. 

As I continued on to my friend’s cabin, I couldn’t help but think about these houses. There must have been excitement and happiness at their beginning. Clearly someone had made them their home. Perhaps the people who lived in them had dreams and expectations of a bright future. Perhaps they even had hopes that the houses would provide shelter and security for a lifetime. Yet, at some point things changed. The houses that once were new and fresh began to age and show signs of deterioration. And as the years went by, the lack of care and attention began to take its toll until finally they ended up abandoned, and waiting to be demolished. At some point the optimism and excitement with which these houses had been built had faded and eventually died. 

As I reflected on this, I wondered what could have happened to cause the dreams with which these houses had been built to die. I suppose it was possible that their owners had simply grown old and tired, and were unable to maintain them. Perhaps, though, a tragedy or an unexpected chain of events had led to their disrepair. Whatever the reason, the hope with which they were built had died and the result was a sad and sorry end for them. 

Hope is not just a good thing, it is essential for life to survive and flourish. More importantly for us as Christians, hope is an absolutely necessary virtue in our lives. As Christians, hope calls us to believe that there is something beyond this world. This belief does not come from mere desire or longing on our part. Rather it finds its roots in Jesus’ promise: 

I am the resurrection and the life; whoever believes in me, even if they die, will live and everyone who lives and believes in me will never die.” 

When I was in grade school I remember having to memorize the Act of Hope —along with the Acts of Faith and Love. While I didn’t remember the exact words to the Act of Hope, when I looked it up, the words came back to me. 

O my God, relying on Your infinite goodness and promises, I hope to obtain pardon of my sins, the help of your grace, and life everlasting, though the merits of Jesus Christ, my Lord and Redeemer.” 

Given all that is going on in our world today, this simple prayer seems increasingly important. For now—perhaps more than ever—is a time when we need hope. 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/092417.cfm

It’s not fair!   Growing up in a family of seven (five boys and two girls) these words were common in our house.   They were automatic response to every perceived injustice or sense of preferential treatment.   I suspect these words were on the lips of the laborers in today’s Gospel parable.   This parable, found only in Matthew’s Gospel, tells the familiar story of a landowner who went out at various times throughout the day to hire laborers for his vineyard.   When it came time to pay the laborers, however, those who were hired late in the day received the same pay as those “who had bore the day’s burden and heat.”  This just doesn’t seem fair.

In order to understand what this parable has to say to us, we need to remember that parables are simple stories that Jesus used to tell us something about God or about our relationship with God.   They were not meant to be taken literally.   Rather, they challenge us to ask what they are telling us about God.  In today’s parable we are reminded that salvation is freely offered by God to all people, regardless of when they arrive in the vineyard of faith.   Such is the way of God.   It is certainly different from the way we often act.   And when you stop and think about it, isn’t that good for us.   

Our fist reading today shares the theme of the Gospel.  In it God, speaking through the Prophet Isaiah, reminded the people that “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord.”   

After reading from St. Paul’s Letter to the Romans for the past twelve Sunday’s, today we switch to St. Paul’s Letter to the Philippians.   In the section we read today Paul acknowledges that he would like “to depart this life and be with Christ.”  He also realizes, though, that for now it is “more necessary for their benefit” that he remain in this world.

Questions for Reflection/Discussion: 

  1. Many people believe that only a limited number will be saved.   Today’s parable would seem to argue against this.  Why do you think God is so generous and undiscriminating with God’s love and offer of salvation?
  2. Have you ever experienced that God’s ways are not your ways?   
  3. We all live with the hope of heaven, yet we know that we are all put on this earth for a purpose.  How do you know when you have accomplished your purpose?
For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/091717.cfm
 
In our Gospel this weekend Jesus talks about the difficult subject of forgiveness.  Now, in the interest of full disclosure, I should mention that I believe forgiveness is one of the hardest things we have to do as Christians.  Yet in our Gospel this weekend, Jesus, in response to a question from Peter about whether we are to forgive as many as seven times, states clearly:  “I say to you, not seven times but seventy-seven times.”   For the Jews of this time, this number would have symbolized forgiveness without end.  After startling Peter and the other disciples with this number, Jesus then told the parable of the owner who forgave the loan of a servant who owed him a huge amount of money.   Unfortunately, that servant refused to forgive the loan of a fellow servant who owed him a much smaller amount, and instead had him thrown into prison.  At the conclusion of the parable Jesus offers the ominous conclusion:   “So will my heavenly Father do to you, unless each of you forgives your brother from your heart.”  
 
What are we to take from this Gospel?   Three things come immediately to mind.  1.  As Christians, forgiveness is not an optional part of our lives;    2.   We can’t expect or ask God to forgive us unless we are willing to forgive one another;  and  3.  The forgiveness we offer to each other must be real and sincere.    
 
Our first reading this weekend is from the Book of Sirach.    It shares the theme of the Gospel.  In the section we read today we are reminded:  “Forgive your neighbor’s injustice; then when you pray, your own sins will be forgiven.”   
 
In our second reading this weekend, Paul reminds us that “None of us lives for oneself, and no one dies for oneself.  For if we live, we live for the Lord, and if we die, we die for the Lord;”   
 
Questions for Reflection/Discussion:
  1. Why, at times, is it so hard to forgive?
  2. What helps you to forgive?
  3. What does it mean to live for the Lord?   

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/091017.cfm 

Our Gospel this weekend comes in two parts.   In the first part, Jesus gives some practical directives as to how to deal with disputes.   “If your brother sins against you, go and tell him his fault between you and him alone ……….. If he does not listen, take one or two others along with you ………. If he refuses to listen to them, tell the church.   If he refuses to listen even to the church, then treat him as you would a Gentile or tax collector.”   Sadly, all too often we reverse this process, going first to others and only last to our brother or sister.   The really important thing to note in this section, though, is Jesus’ last words:  “treat him as you would a Gentile or tax collector.”   And as we know from Jesus’ ministry, he welcomed these people and treated them with respect and love.   These are very challenging words. 

In the second half of today’s Gospel, Jesus appears to make an impossible promise:  “if two of you agree on earth about anything for which they are to pray, it shall be granted to them by my heavenly Father.”   In this regard, it is important to note that if two people are really united in prayer, they will also be united in their desire to do God’s will ----- and will pray to do God’s will.  

Our first reading this weekend is taken from the Book of the Prophet Ezekiel.  In it we are reminded that we have a responsibility to try to “warn the wicked” and turn them from their way.   It is not enough simply to be concerned about our own welfare.

Our second reading this weekend is once again taken from the Letter of St. Paul to the Romans.  In it Paul reminds us that the commandments of the Old Testament are summed up by the new commandment of Christ:  “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”  

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. In this weekend’s Gospel Jesus is clear that we are to go to our brother or sister to try to resolve issues before going to anyone else.  Why do so many of us do just the opposite?
  2. How do you know when it is appropriate to confront someone, and when it is better simply to accept their faults?   
  3. What is a practical way to love someone as you love yourself? 

Judge Not

The column below was submitted as a letter to the editor for the Catholic Spirit. It was written in response to two letters to the editor that appeared in the August 10 edition of the Catholic Spirit.  

I hate waiting in lines. Unless there is just a single line for people who want to check in/out; get gas; pay for their groceries, or whatever, I always choose the wrong line. I inevitably end up behind someone who is sure they have the exact change—if only they can find it; or someone who can’t find their credit card; or someone who doesn’t quite understand why they can’t use a coupon that expired three weeks ago. 

Given my abhorrence to waiting in lines, you can perhaps appreciate how surprised I was to read the letters to the editor in the August 10th Catholic Spirit. (The newspaper of the Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis.) The issue they were writing about concerned an Illinois Bishop’s decision to prohibit Catholics in same-sex marriages from receiving communion or having their funeral in a Catholic Church. One of the writers was clear that God “does not have a place in heaven for those who decide his rules are outdated and don’t fit the current whims of individuals.” Another suggested that: “Those who claim they are loving others by allowing forbidden practices may just be loving them into hell.” As I read these comments I couldn’t help but think that these writers had found a way to expedite the judgement line at the end of world. 

This is pure genius. I am surprised that no one thought of this before. By narrowing down the issues that Jesus articulated in Matthew 25:31-46 to a single question: “Did you question/wonder about/believe in same sex marriage?”—in effect, by doing some pre-judging in this world—it will save God time at the end of the world. In fact, the line at the judgement at the end of the world should move along quite swiftly. We won’t have to worry about whether or not we fed the hungry; gave drink to the thirsty; welcomed the stranger; clothed the naked; comforted the ill; or visited the imprisoned. Of course, though, if we narrow down the criteria for judgement to a single issue/question, it does make it difficult to explain why Jesus told that parable in the first place. 

We need to be clear. The idea that we can save God time at the end of the world by doing some pre-judging here is complete nonsense.  God searches our hearts, our minds, and our souls; and God—and God alone—is the only One who is qualified to do any judging. And while I can’t say for sure, I suspect God is not all that appreciative of those who think it is right and proper to save time at the end of the world by doing some pre-judging here.   

As for me, I am grateful that judgement belongs to God alone, and that it is something God doesn’t need any help with—however well intended. I am also hopeful that at the end of the world God will grade on a curve.  I say this because the older I get, the more I realize how much in need of God’s mercy I am. 

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