Terri Ashmore

Managing Director
Administration

Terri Ashmore joined the Basilica staff as Director of Development in 1993.  She helped lead a $10 million capital fundraising effort for the structural restoration of The Basilica, the $7.7 million build out of The Basilica's undercroft, and a $4.2 million church tuck pointing and stained glass window restoration project.  Since 2003 as Managing Director, Terri works with the Accounting & Finance, Communications, Development and Facilities teams running day to day operations to support The Basilica's vision and mission.  She is a liaison to parish and Basilica Landmark governance committees.  Terri enjoys volunteering with the Jeremiah Program and serves on the Board for Lundstrum Center for the Performing Arts.

(612) 317-3471

Recent Posts by Terri Ashmore

In my hometown, Memorial Day signals the start of summer. This year, my mom and I went to the town cemetery to put flowers on our family members’ graves, and on Monday we gathered with the whole town at the courthouse for an Avenue of Flags dedicated to deceased veterans. 


It’s a beautiful memorial and draws hundreds of people who come together to remember their loved ones. With over 1,000 U.S. flags whipping in the wind, a sea of people in lawn chairs listen to the reading of each veterans’ name and mourn with families who have come to dedicate the flags of those who died in the past year. It’s simple, solemn and celebratory. 


Often this remembrance is the first time spent outside seeing friends and neighbors, experiencing the sun, the breeze, and the joy of summer.  


What does the start of summer mean to you? At The Basilica, our parish community explores Personal Stewardship in June and July. I invite you to consider how you care for yourself in mind, body and spirit. Sometimes I find that friends and family concentrate and worry about everyone but themselves. Summer somehow gives us permission to take it a little easier...to go for a walk, smell the roses, or contemplate the feel of the sun after a very long winter.  


The questions of how we care for ourselves and how we re-charge and re-energize probably have unique answers for each of us. For some it’s enjoying sweet fresh fruit and garden-grown vegetables as part of a healthy diet. Others head outdoors for biking, fishing, playing sports, or going for a swim at the lake. Many take summer vacations to break away from routines and the responsibilities of home, work, or both.  
As you consider the importance of Personal Stewardship, I encourage you to remember the words of Saint Teresa of Avila—“Christ has no body now on earth but yours, no hands but yours, no feet but yours....” She challenged us to live our faith and reminded us that it’s our job to do Christ’s work on earth. How can we possibly answer this call unless we first commit to take care of ourselves in mind, body and spirit?  


There are many ways to embrace Personal Stewardship. Just commit to do one thing to renew and recharge yourself this summer. The key is actively, consciously making choices that contribute to your well-being. Consider the nice weather an opportunity to get outside for fun and exercise. Take a stroll through the neighborhood or around the lake. Play tennis or golf. Work in the garden. Go for a bike ride. Summer gives us so many possibilities to get moving and enjoy the outdoors. Or take advantage of the great fresh food offered at your local grocery store or neighborhood farmers market. As we move through summer, see what looks good at the farmers market and experiment with cooking up healthy and nutritious offerings.    


Think about focusing on your prayer life. Worship with us weekly or visit The Basilica in the quiet of the day for contemplation and reflection.  Consider Centering Prayer, a spiritual practice of quieting the mind and meditating in silence. It’s offered twice weekly on Wednesdays from 7:30 – 8:00am, and Fridays from 10:00 – 11:00am in the Bride’s Room located on the Basilica’s ground level. You’ll meet with a small group to discuss a book and then practice Centering Prayer for 20 minutes. Walk the labyrinth on The Basilica’s west lawn, or attend the Mental Health Blessing at all our June 27 and 28 liturgies. 


Please explore Personal Stewardship in June and July and take time to consider the importance of caring for yourself in mind, body and spirit this summer. You’ll find lots of ideas at www.mary.org/personalstewardship.

 

Preparing for Lent, I find my focus is often on what to give up. But I’ve come to realize the opportunity to give alms to help those in need is an equally important practice of our Catholic faith traditions.

One way to do this at The Basilica is to share your financial gifts with our St. Vincent de Paul Outreach ministries (SVdP). One hundred percent of every dollar you donate goes back to help someone in need. During Lent, please take a coin bank, fill it, and bring it back on Holy Thursday and, if you can, make a pledge to help those most in need in our city.   

Five days a week at The Basilica, more than 70 St. Vincent de Paul Outreach volunteers welcome people from our neighborhood. They carry out this ministry by visiting with people and listening to their concerns and needs. We offer help in many ways, and when we can’t assist financially, these volunteers offer a listening ear, a warm welcome, and help connecting people to community resources. 

Laura Schommer, A long time SVdP volunteer, helps with our Saturday Shoe Ministry and weekly Outreach. Laura has volunteered for the past 20 years and I asked her about her involvement over the years.

“It could be any one of us” Laura said of the people she meets each week. “Just a few things go wrong, and any of us could find ourselves needing help and support. I’m honored and humbled to be able to meet with people and hear their stories. It’s gratifying.”

Laura shared the story of a young pregnant woman who came to The Basilica many winters ago. She didn’t have a winter coat. Laura had just brought a red wool coat to church that had belonged to her mother, and she gave it to the young woman. All these years later, Laura still remembers this encounter.     

The work of our SVdP volunteers brings to mind a quote from Saint Teresa of Avila. “Christ has no body now on earth but yours, no hands but yours, no feet but yours…” She challenged us to live our faith and reminded us that it’s our job to do Christ’s work on earth. 

Your financial gifts truly make a difference in people’s lives, and your contributions go directly out to help people in need. Last year alone, your donations to SVdP and our Outreach ministries:

· Helped 352 families keep their housing and prevented them from homelessness.

· Provided bus cards or gas vouchers to more than 4,000 people that helped them get to work, school, or appointments.

· Offered a meal and practical and spiritual support to 900 participants in our Pathways life-skills programs. 

Sharing our financial support and coming together, our parish gave more than $600,000 last year to help people in need in our city. In past years, we’ve also supported affordable housing in North Minneapolis, and it’s exciting to report that, as a result of a partnership, the West Broadway Crescent Apartments are now open and filling up with new residents. 

This Lent, we ask you to consider an intentional, pledged commitment to support our outreach ministries. Watch for a letter with more information, and the weekend of March 21 and 22 bring your completed pledge form for our St. Vincent de Paul Outreach ministries to church.

Our St. Vincent de Paul Outreach ministry is our faith in action. 

 

My immediate response to this question is to name the people that live next door to me. But in scripture, Luke challenges us to look beyond the obvious in the parable of the Good Samaritan, and we are repeatedly called to love our neighbor as ourselves.

During December and January, we invite you to explore Global Stewardship and learn about the challenges faced by our neighbors who are refugees. Historically, Minnesota has been a place of welcome and safe haven and today, Minnesota is home to over 70,000 refugees. 

Our neighbors now include the largest population of Somalis and some of the largest Liberian communities outside of that country. Sudanese, Hmong, Ethiopians, Cambodians, Bosnians, and people from the former Soviet Union now call Minnesota home. They are being joined by refugees from Burma, Bhutan, and Iraq.   

You can hear some of their stories first hand by watching the short film, “Refugee’s Journey to Minnesota” here. Parishioner Dan Baluff embarked on his own journey to film interviews with refugees relocated to Minnesota. Through Dan’s work, you will be introduced to Mariam, Salim, Tha, Hakeem, Abdi, Ogang and others, all refugees who now call Minnesota home.

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Their stories compel us to consider how blessed we are and their journeys share many consistent themes. Can you imagine having to flee for your life on foot with only the possessions you could carry? Flight from civil war and violence. Homes being burned to the ground. Separation of children from their parents, of husband from wife. Not knowing where beloved family members are, or even if they are still alive. Years of hard life in refugee camps, where finding food and fear of violence were daily concerns. Children born and growing up in the camps.  Some compared these years in refugee camps to being in jail, with no work, no school, and constant uncertainty about the future.

As these new Minnesotans work to rebuild their lives and make new homes, courage, strength, determination and resilience are clearly in evidence. Like us, they are looking for opportunities and a little help along the way. Help learning English, how to ride the bus or find educational opportunities for their children and themselves, are some of the simple ways we can help make a difference as new refugees make their way in our community.

As we gather with our families to celebrate Christmas, take a moment to consider how we are called to welcome refugees. Are we ready to open our minds and hearts to the strangers in our midst? Are we afraid, or are we ready to help our new neighbors whose hopes and dreams much like our own, revolve around family, safety, education, and finding good jobs?

 

 

Coming Together as Community

Growing up in a small town, everyone knew each other. In church, school or life in general, everyone was involved or things simply didn’t happen. When I left after college, I found myself with a new job in a new town and made my way to the local Catholic Church for Mass. It was a large community—much bigger than I was used to. People rushed in and out on Sundays and I came and went too and never really connected. No one seemed to notice me. No one asked me to get involved. It felt strange to feel lonely in the midst of all those people at Mass. I didn't feel like I belonged. 

As I’ve grown older, I realized that most often all you have to do is put your hand up and say ‘I'm interested’ or ‘I'd like to get involved.’ In most organizations, volunteers are desperately needed and you can find a place, and that’s definitely true here at The Basilica. But fresh out of college as a young adult, I was waiting to be asked.

At The Basilica, my sincere hope is that your experience is one of welcome and feeling a strong sense of belonging. For long-time parishioners, I hope we see our important role in welcoming newcomers, in greeting the strangers in our midst, and inviting others to get involved. 

As parish members, it’s our job to make everyone, guests and members alike, feel welcome and part of our community. We can’t function as a healthy, welcoming community without your active involvement. We need you to come together regularly in prayer and worship. We need your help as ministers and parish leaders to serve others in our parish and our city. We need your ongoing financial support to sustain the work of our parish community.

Why do I feel at home at The Basilica of Saint Mary? In some ways, it’s very different than where I grew up. It’s such a large, impressive building, and it houses a huge parish community—about 6,500 households with  over 12,000 people—our church is bigger than where I grew up. 

But big as it is, The Basilica also feels warm and inviting. In my earliest days at The Basilica, I was asked to help with hospitality after Mass. Back then we brewed the coffee in the back of the church while mass was winding to a close. After Mass people hung around in church to visit and catch up. Next I was asked to help blow up helium balloons for an event. Small ways of getting involved, but each time I helped, I met people and got to know them. Soon I was seeing familiar friendly faces whenever I went to church. Being part of a group felt good to me. In small ways, I knew I was making a difference and preparing the way for others. 

Belonging to a parish community, we are each asked to take part. That starts with coming together as a community for worship. It happens when we greet a stranger or welcome a new volunteer into ministry. It happens when we pray for the ill or grieving. It happens when we teach our children about their faith, when we sing or serve at Mass, mow the lawn, or shovel the snow. 

It happens when we make a financial commitment to sustain our parish ministries and the day-to-day work of our church community. I hope you will join me and make a pledged financial commitment to support our ministries and the ongoing work of our parish in 2015. 

When we come together as a community, we share common experiences like roots in our Catholic faith, and we share our differences too. When we worship and work side by side, we learn from each other’s journeys and experiences as we come together to live our faith every day. 

 

September 2nd will be the first day for children and families from Child Garden Montessori at The Basilica of Saint Mary.  Child Garden Montessori is the new tenant in the Basilica School.  They will share the space with the Basilica, who will use the School for their evening and weekend programs.  

Child Garden Montessori serves families with infants ages 6 weeks old to children 6 years old, and they have combined two previous locations into this new location at The Basilica.  

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