Terri Ashmore

Managing Director
Administration

Terri Ashmore joined the Basilica staff as Director of Development in 1993.  She helped lead a $10 million capital fundraising effort for the structural restoration of The Basilica, the $7.7 million build out of The Basilica's undercroft, and a $4.2 million church tuck pointing and stained glass window restoration project.  Since 2003 as Managing Director, Terri works with the Accounting & Finance, Communications, Development and Facilities teams running day to day operations to support The Basilica's vision and mission.  She is a liaison to parish and Basilica Landmark governance committees.  Terri enjoys volunteering with the Jeremiah Program and serves on the Board for Lundstrum Center for the Performing Arts.

(612) 317-3471

Recent Posts by Terri Ashmore

KIPP Stand Academy is moving to a new North Minneapolis location this week.  A Minnesota public charter School serving 5-8 grade students, KIPP has been the Basilica's School tenant since 2008.  We send our best wishes to KIPP's students, faculty and staff as they move and get settled in their new school home.   

All Church entrances are open, but repairs are being completed on the west ground level entrance.  Serious water leakage was uncovered during repairs, resulting in a caulking project on the front Church stairs to help control moisture problems.  Painting and repairs to interior walls and ceilings begin this week at the ground level entrances.  Handicapped access is available through the West ground level entrance, and also on the Church's upper east side, by Cowley Center with handicapped parking available in both locations.   

Church restoration continues.  Old, wet insulation is being removed from above the ceiling to allow the interior walls to dry out.  Removal is being done in stages and completion is critical in advance of any planning for an interior restoration.  Initial removal will be completed this week, with additional work planned for next year.  

As a child, my approach to Lent was pretty straight forward. I gave up candy, and so did all of my friends. As an adult, I’d like to suggest a different approach to you this year. Paula Kaempffer, The Basilica’s Director of Learning, challenged me to consider doing something extra to explore my faith this year during Lent. Honestly, giving up precious time may be a more challenging and more rewarding approach to Lent. At The Basilica, there is no shortage of options to help do something extra.

Fridays in Lent:

Consider committing part of Lenten Friday nights to participate in 5:00pm Mass or in the very moving 7:00pm Stations of the Cross.  There’s a free soup supper in between — so you can spend time in quiet, prayerful reflection, and spend time getting to know others in our parish community over a bowl of soup.

Some other alternatives for doing something extra in Lent are our wonderful Learning offerings. 

Lenten Faith Sharing Groups:

Wednesdays, 7:00 – 8:30pm

Parishioner Tricia Burns leads our small Faith Sharing Group. This is an opportunity to pray, discuss the Sunday scripture readings and support one another as we travel on our faith journey. Reflect on how the scriptures relate to our everyday life, and be enriched by the diversity of each member of the group.  Consider taking a moment to share your life, your faith, and your values in a Lenten Faith Sharing Group.

Redeeming a Prison Society – A Liturgical and Sacramental Response to Mass Incarceration

Sundays March 9, 16, 23, 11:00am – 12:30pm

You’ve read the statistics about how many minority and economically disadvantaged individuals end up in prison. Have you considered the injustice of locking up more than 2 million of our neighbors in jail? Dr. Amy Levad, Assistant Professor of Moral Theology at the University of St. Thomas, will lead this series and help us explore the causes and effects of mass incarceration and alternatives to jails and prisons. She will also share how the sacraments of Eucharist and Reconciliation ground us in a moral vision for justice on par with the Civil Rights movement to redeem our prison society.

Examining Atonement – Justice, Nonviolence and the Cross

Sundays March 30, April 6 and 13, 11:00am – 12:30pm

How did the cross, an instrument of torture used against political prisoners and other criminals during the Roman Empire, become a central symbol of our Christian faith? Over 3 Sundays, explore the emergence of the cross as a symbol in Christian history.  Examine the development of the Church’s doctrine of atonement and grapple with understanding how salvation is won by Christ’s incarnation, death on the cross, and resurrection. 

Led by Dr. Kimberly Vrudny, an Associate Professor of Systematic Theology at the University of St. Thomas, this series and help us consider some contemporary issues in atonement theology.

 

Fleeing violence. This experience may seem far removed for most of us as we go about our everyday lives. If you had to escape to save your life and leave your home and all your possessions behind, what would you do?  Where would you go? 
Today, millions of people in Syria are struggling with these very questions. The New York Times has been covering and offering analysis of the Syrian refugee crisis and featuring compelling photo essays that provide an amazing visual perspective that takes you beyond the statistics. With the growing crisis in Syria, we still need to come to grips with the sheer numbers of people impacted.

Just a year ago, the Syrian refugee crisis affected about 270,000 people — compare that to the city of St. Paul which has about 290,000 residents. In recent months, the impacts on Syrian citizens have exploded and over 6 million people have been displaced.  

The entire Twin Cities metro area has 2.9 million people — about half the number of Syrian people who’ve been forced from their homes by war and violence. Just stop for moment and consider what it would be like if everyone in our 7 county metro area was on the move by foot, and taking only the belongings they could carry.  It’s staggering to contemplate. 

Of Syria’s 6 million refugees, about 4.25 million people are still in Syria, but are on the move, having been pushed out of their homes to save their lives. Another 2.2 million Syrians have fled their home country spilling across the borders into neighboring lands of Lebanon (almost 800,000 refugees), Turkey (over 500,000 refugees), Jordan (over 540,000 refugees), Egypt (over 100,000 refugees), and Iraq (almost 200,000 refugees).  

The governments of these countries approach the swelling numbers of refugees differently. Lebanon’s government has chosen not to build refugee camps — but the result sounds like what you might read in the Bible. One New York Times report described people finding shelter in over crowded apartments, partially built structures and in stables — which strikes a special chord as we consider the journey of the Holy Family to Bethlehem, and their flight to Egypt after the birth of Jesus. In Jordan the Zaatari Refugee Camp has grown so much, it is now their largest city. 

The United Nations has compared what’s happening in and around Syria to some of the largest crises in recent history — like the tragic impacts of the Rwandan genocide in 1994, the  impacts on the Iraqi people during the war, and the violence that ended the existence of Yugloslavia. What makes the crisis in Syria stand out is the exponential growth in numbers of refugees over such a sort period of time. 

During December and January, our parish will explore the journey of refugees as part of our Global Stewardship initiative. We invite you to find our resource kit online and check out a documentary film made by parishioner Dan Baluff. Dan  sought out refugees and agencies in the Twin Cities that offer support. He conducted many interviews inviting people to share the stories of their journeys, their experiences, and how they came to arrive in the Twin Cities.  

You’ll hear stories of their persistence, extreme danger, acts of kindness, chance and survival. On Sunday, January 19 at 1:00pm, we’ll show clips from the documentary, and invite you to join us at The Basilica to hear a Speakers Panel who will share insights about their work in the Twin Cities and around the world to assist refugees.

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