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Michael Jensen

Making Time For Prayer

The American writer, Flannery O’Connor, once said: “Every morning between 9 and 12 I go to my room and sit before a piece of paper. Many times I just sit for three hours with no ideas coming to me. But I know one thing:  If an idea does come between 9 and 12, I am there ready for it.“ I think those words are a great description of prayer — or at least my prayer. I say this, because I have come to believe that one of the things that can help our prayer the most is setting aside a regular time and place for prayer so as to  make ourselves available to God. 

Many years ago when I was first ordained, I would pray Morning Prayer before Mass, but then would set aside time additional time for prayer in the late afternoon. This routine had served me well in the seminary when my schedule was very predictable. Unfortunately, I soon discovered that life in the parish doesn’t always follow a routine. After a few years I realized that my afternoon prayer time had become rushed and hurried, and on some days was given over to what I thought were more pressing matters. 

When I talked about this with my spiritual director, he suggested I try to spend more time in prayer in the morning. I pleaded that I wasn’t a morning person, but he pressed the issue and suggested I at least try it.   And so at his strong urging, I began to set my alarm clock a half hour earlier. I eventually began to set it for forty-five minutes earlier, and the past few years I’ve taken to getting up an hour earlier. I spend this “extra” time in prayer. 

Now in mentioning the above, I need to be clear. I am still not a morning person. I hate it when my alarm goes off in the morning. And while I am embarrassed to admit it, there are times when I shave a few minutes off the hour because I have pushed the snooze button one too many times. And to be completely honest, I have to admit that occasionally during that hour I will doze off. There are other times, though, when I feel God’s presence and experience God’s grace. These times are not under my control.  They simply occur. I have come to believe, though, that at least part of the reason they occur at all is that I have made myself available to God.   

Flannery O’Connor became a great writer because she regularly made time available for ideas to come to her. I believe if we regularly make time available for prayer, we will know God’s presence and experience God’s grace. Certainly this is not going to happen each and every time we go to prayer, but the chances are greatly increased that it will occur, if we regularly make ourselves to God.  

The challenge for all of us is to regularly set aside a time for prayer, so those times can occur. If we can make ourselves available to God in prayer on a regular basis, I am convinced that God will indeed come and make God’s dwelling with us — maybe not every time we pray, but certainly often enough that we’ll keep coming back for more.

 

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