Photo provided by: 
Michael Jensen

The Heart of Being Catholic

I’m a seven year-old Catholic. My memory of baptism at The Basilica ranks a close second to the birth of my daughters. Along with many others who lay prostrate in the sanctuary, I experienced a profound conversion through the R.C.I.A. process, the height of which was the Easter Vigil.

As a new Catholic, I returned to the theme of joy and gratitude time and time again. The Easter season seems to point in this direction. New life is everywhere, and this Easter season is rich in encouragement, inspiration and hope. Each time I attend Mass at The Basilica, the reminders are everywhere: Joy and gratitude are proclaimed in music, our prayers and in our communion with one another.  

Being honest, I’ve needed that reminder. Especially this year.  

Day after day, we hear of the sin, neglect and pain in our local Catholic Church. 
And I’ve asked myself I chose this? This ugliness?

The ugliness of the loss of innocence. The ugliness of perpetuating these sins with lack of candor. The ugliness of losing focus on the true victims: the victims of abuse.

It’s hard to feel fresh in your faith when it is hard to distinguish it from the faith embedded in scandal.

Today, I do have great joy and gratitude in my faith, but it isn’t centered so much on people or on the local institutional church. Today, I sometimes worry about the choice I have made to join this church. I chose a church whose focus was not on self, but serving. Whose focus was not on judgment, but on love; a church whose focus guided me to gratitude.

I joined The Basilica.

In this struggle, I found my letter from 2006 regarding why I wanted to join the Catholic Church. Here was part of my response, as I learn about the traditions of the Catholic tradition, I feel encouraged to become a part of this faith community. I love the deep and historical tradition of the faith. I appreciate the necessity of personal accountability. I want to be a part of this community that gives to its parishioners and also gives back to the community. I look forward to participating fully in the worship service and hope to raise my children in this community in the future because of the core values in which it not only believes, but also lives.

To me still today, The Basilica represents what I was searching for, and today, I’m still here by choice. Trying to center on faith, not on those individuals who have made mistakes.  

The real loss in what has happened in our local church is faith. Not faith in the church, but our faith in God. Despite this great distraction, I hope we will continue to choose faith. And I hope we will continue to represent all the good that is at the heart of our Catholic faith.

Perhaps now we can be part of the solution. Be honest. Represent our challenged Church by being public representatives of what we love about it, and why we continue to choose it. I see Fr. Bauer’s honesty and leadership, along with his invitation for open conversation as part of the solution.

The Basilica gives me real hope. People are joining, giving and volunteering. And young people are finding their adult religious home in the pews and in the activities of our church. It still speaks, inviting everyone to believe in the good that God has given us. I am so grateful to our parish for reinforcing all that I know about the church I chose eight years ago.

Thank you for being a part of it, and for the collective voice for good, affirming and encouraging so many. You spread the faith by representing it so beautifully, in the pews at The Basilica and in our community. You are the church.

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