Realizing What it Means to Be a Christian

Many years ago, when my older brother was in first grade, he fell on the school playground and broke his arm. In those days, Anoka only had a small hospital and certainly no emergency room, so when my dad was called, he picked up my brother and took him to the Doctor’s office. As my dad told the story, the doctor was trying to get the broken arm back in its proper position so he could put a cast on it. At one point in the process, however, the doctor must have done something that cause a spike in pain, because my brother let out a yelp and with tears in his eyes looked at my dad and said, “Don’t let him hurt me anymore.” My dad told me that it was at that moment he realized what it meant to be a parent.

When my dad told me this story I had just graduated from college, and I think he was trying to make the point that there are certain moments in life when a realization we had previously missed, suddenly dawns on us. In this particular case, I think my dad was trying to help me realize that since I had graduated from college, I was “grown up” and needed to get my act together.

I suspect in each of our lives there are similar kinds of moments of realization—moments when we realize what it means to be in love, or what I means to be a spouse or a parent, or what it means to be a friend. The list could go on and on. I would like to suggest, though, that in addition to these singular moments of realization, there also should be ongoing realizations in our lives. From my perspective, one of the ongoing realizations in our lives should be the realization of what it means to be a Christian.

On a regular basis, we should realize that being a Christian means that we can’t always do or have what we want. For example, on a regular basis, I think we should be struck by the realization that if we are going to call ourselves Christians, we have to work at forgiveness. On a regular basis, we should realize that we can’t always put our own needs first. On a regular basis, we should realize that judgment is God’s business and not ours. On a regular basis, we should realize that we are called to care for those who are less fortunate. And on a regular basis, we should realize that being a Christian means that we are called to love our neighbor as our self.

If we are never caught up short by the realization that we have failed to live and act as a follower of Jesus, I would suggest that we have made being a Christian far too easy. Being a Christian shouldn’t always be easy or convenient. At times we will fail. This realization should be a regular and reoccurring experience in our lives. Once we understand this, I believe we are on our way to an adult and mature faith.

 

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