Syrian Refugees Crowd Around a Supply Truck
Photo provided by: 
Ayria Kudre

Who Is Your Neighbor?

My immediate response to this question is to name the people that live next door to me. But in scripture, Luke challenges us to look beyond the obvious in the parable of the Good Samaritan, and we are repeatedly called to love our neighbor as ourselves.

During December and January, we invite you to explore Global Stewardship and learn about the challenges faced by our neighbors who are refugees. Historically, Minnesota has been a place of welcome and safe haven and today, Minnesota is home to over 70,000 refugees. 

Our neighbors now include the largest population of Somalis and some of the largest Liberian communities outside of that country. Sudanese, Hmong, Ethiopians, Cambodians, Bosnians, and people from the former Soviet Union now call Minnesota home. They are being joined by refugees from Burma, Bhutan, and Iraq.   

You can hear some of their stories first hand by watching the short film, “Refugee’s Journey to Minnesota” here. Parishioner Dan Baluff embarked on his own journey to film interviews with refugees relocated to Minnesota. Through Dan’s work, you will be introduced to Mariam, Salim, Tha, Hakeem, Abdi, Ogang and others, all refugees who now call Minnesota home.


Their stories compel us to consider how blessed we are and their journeys share many consistent themes. Can you imagine having to flee for your life on foot with only the possessions you could carry? Flight from civil war and violence. Homes being burned to the ground. Separation of children from their parents, of husband from wife. Not knowing where beloved family members are, or even if they are still alive. Years of hard life in refugee camps, where finding food and fear of violence were daily concerns. Children born and growing up in the camps.  Some compared these years in refugee camps to being in jail, with no work, no school, and constant uncertainty about the future.

As these new Minnesotans work to rebuild their lives and make new homes, courage, strength, determination and resilience are clearly in evidence. Like us, they are looking for opportunities and a little help along the way. Help learning English, how to ride the bus or find educational opportunities for their children and themselves, are some of the simple ways we can help make a difference as new refugees make their way in our community.

As we gather with our families to celebrate Christmas, take a moment to consider how we are called to welcome refugees. Are we ready to open our minds and hearts to the strangers in our midst? Are we afraid, or are we ready to help our new neighbors whose hopes and dreams much like our own, revolve around family, safety, education, and finding good jobs?



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