Thoughts on the Readings for the 4th Sunday of Easter (B) 2018

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/042218.cfm  
 
Each year on the Fourth Sunday of Easter, we read a section of the 10th chapter of St. John’s Gospel.   This chapter contains Jesus’ discourse on the “Good Shepherd.”   In fact our Gospel for this weekend begins with Jesus’ statement:  “I am the Good Shepherd.”   In this Gospel, Jesus articulates exactly what it means to be a Good Shepherd 
  
  1. The Good Shepherd lays down his life for his sheep.  He doesn’t run away when he sees the wolf coming.
  2. The Good Shepherd knows his sheep and they know him. 
  3. The Good Shepherd is the shepherd of “all” the sheep, not just the ones that belong to his fold.
  4. The Good Shepherd does all that he does freely and out of love. 
 
Jesus’ description of the Good Shepherd would clearly set him apart from Israel’s religious leaders in the past, as well as at that time, who did not always -- or even often -- act in the best interests of their people.  
 
Our first reading for this weekend is taken from the Acts of the Apostles.  In it we hear Peter “filled with the Holy Spirit” address the Sanhedrin and boldly proclaim his faith in Jesus Christ as the one through whom salvation is offered.
 
Our second reading for this weekend is once again taken from the first letter of St. John.   In the section we read this weekend, John reminds us that we are children of God now, but what we shall be has not yet been revealed.   When it is revealed, however “we do know that we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.” 
 
Questions for Reflection/Discussion:
 
  1. Even though many people have not had any experience with sheep, they find the image of the Good Shepherd very comforting.    Why do you think that is? 
  2. The priest sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church, particularly in the United States, has revealed clearly that many priests and bishops are not the shepherds we would want or hope for.   Despite this, many people still look to the church and its leaders for guidance/support/leadership.  Why is this?
  3. What do you think it means that we shall be like God?  
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