Archives: March 2017

Last night I went to dinner with some friends. We got into an animated conversation about politics and religion, two topics my mother strictly forbad during dinner. The people at the table next to us were much quieter. Though they exchanged the occasional words, most of their time was spent in silence as they used their personal devices, maybe even texting one another. Unwittingly they proved a point I tried to make. Though they were spending time together they seemed to be very much separated from one another using the very tools that were conceived to connect people. They were in their own worlds shaping and even creating their own realities.

Pointing to our neighbors, I mused about the fact that on the one hand humanity is more connected than ever before, thanks to all the travel opportunities and modern means of communication. On the other hand, humanity seems more divided than ever. And ironically, the very tools intended to unite us are used to distance ourselves from one another and even to separate and divide us. 

One of the great culprits of division in our society is our rampant propensity for a type of “self-curated reality.” Many if not most of us have resorted to creating our own bubble of reality accepting as true only those facts that fit within our own world view, regardless if the information is factual or not. In addition, we surround ourselves with like-minded people be they real or virtual. On social media, e.g. many of us “friend” those who share our worldview and “de-friend” those who don’t. This tends to create a vicious cycle of “self-curated reality” which is difficult to break. Rather than relate to one another and connect on topics that matter, we close ourselves off from thoughts that oppose our opinions and withdraw in self-curated realities.

One possible antidote to this is a much-forgotten gift we all share: our conscience. As Christians, we believe that we are created in the image of God with an innate sense of right and wrong, i.e. our conscience. This God-given conscience is a kind of moral compass that allows us to navigate the stormy moral waters of day to day life. It allows us to see our human world through the eyes of God. When used, it can prove to be a great corrective to the dangers of “self-curated realities” that are isolating and divisive. Thanks to some old cartoons, I think of our conscience as the little angel whispering into our ear what we ought to think and do.

In order to recall, encourage and even unleash the power of our God-given conscience we have created a Conversation of Conscience on the south wall in our Teresa of Calcutta Hall in the Basilica’s lower level. The overall theme for this Conversation of Conscience is Pope Francis’ proposed Revolution of Love and Tenderness. This Revolution is artistically represented through a wood carving by Sr. Mary Ann Osborne. We invite you to meditate on this work of art and to share your response to the art. In addition, four questions are intended to start a post-it conversation: Why call for a revolution? Who is deserving of my love? What is tenderness? How can I make a difference? Before doing this, please allow your conscience to percolate and inspire your thinking. Some guiding thoughts are posted on the same wall.

The Conversation of Conscience will be open throughout Lent. We hope you will participate. Your answers will be the base for further conversation on the topic. Therefore, engage your conscience as an antidote to our society’s temptation to limit reality to our own. And please invite your personal device users at dinner to do the same, maybe even through social media.

 

Please click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser for this Sunday’s readings: http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/031614.cfm

Each year on the Second Sunday of Lent we read one of the accounts of the Transfiguration of Christ.  Since we are in year A of our three year cycle of readings, this year we read Matthew’s account of the Transfiguration.   

While some of the particulars may vary in the different accounts of the Transfiguration, the major details are the same.   1.  The Transfiguration took place 6 or 8 days after Jesus’ first prediction of his passion;    2. Jesus took Peter, James and John up a “high mountain;” 3. He was transfigured before their eyes;   4. Moses and Elijah (representing the law and the prophets) appeared with Jesus;   5. Peter wanted to stay; and finally 6. A voice from the cloud identified Jesus as “my beloved Son.  Listen to him.”    

We don’t know exactly what happened at the Transfiguration or how it happened.  What we do know, though, is important.  The Transfiguration was a glimpse of the glory of God revealed in and through Jesus Christ.   It was a moment of grace that enabled the disciples to continue to persevere and to trust when they encountered difficulties and trials.   

Our first reading this weekend is from the book of Genesis.  It is God’s promise to Abraham our father in faith: “I will make of you a great nation and I will bless you; I will make your name great, so that you will be a blessing.”

Our second reading this weekend is from the second Letter of Saint Paul to Timothy.  The opening sentence reminds us that we are to:  “Bear your share of hardship for the gospel with the strength that comes from God.”  

Questions for reflection/discussion:

  1. I believe we all have “transfiguring” moments in our lives ---  times of great grace, comfort and peace.   These moments are fleeting, and while not as intense as the experience of the disciples at Jesus’ Transfiguration, they are no less real.  When have you had a “transfiguring” moment in your life?
  2. These “transfiguring” moments can help us “bear our share of hardship.” Has this been true for you? 
  3.  God told Abraham He would bless him. When have you felt God’s blessings in your life?  

Elections will be held this spring for Parish Council representatives for our Liturgy and Sacred Arts and Christian areas. If you know parishioners who would make excellent representatives, please fill out a nomination form by April 6.

Nomination form

Parish Council members serve as an advisory group to the Pastor and assist with strategic planning, creation of effective communication structures, policies and procedures, and educating parishioners about biblical stewardship. 

Our Parish Council is composed of:

  • 6 elected members including 2 representatives each for Learning, Christian Life, and Liturgy areas,
  • 3 appointed "at large" members,
  • appointed representatives from the Finance and Development Committees,
  • 4 ex-officio members including 2 Parish Trustees, Pastor, and Managing Director.

All elected and appointed at large members serve terms of 3 years and can serve a maximum of 2 terms.  

Council members should be sensitive to the needs, ambitions and desires of The Basilica community to fulfill its mission, and through collaboration, consultation and support, serve as an advisory group to the Pastor.  The

Parish Council also responds to and acts on the recommendations of the Parish Finance Committee and Stewardship Council.

Contact Terri Ashmore more information.  

 

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