Archives: April 2018

Basilica volunteers and leaders will hold a conversation with parishioners on the call to support our neighbors through becoming a Sanctuary Supporting Congregation and how it is different from a Sanctuary Congregation.

Sanctuary Supporting Congregation: Listening Sessions
Sunday, April 15, Following 7:30, 9:30, 11:30am and 4:30pm Masses
Saints Ambrose/Teresa Room, Ground Level

The Basilica parish community is committed to accompany, serve, and defend immigrants in our community. We co-sponsor refugee families, partner with Advocates for Human Rights, and support families seeking asylum. We are also following the call of our Pope to offer support to those who rely on the protection of DACA to avoid deportation. Come to learn more about The Basilica’s commitment to this ministry supporting people who face deportation. For more information, call 612.317.3477. 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/040818.cfm 

I have always felt a great deal of sympathy for poor Thomas.   One quick and ill conceived comment and he has been forever labeled “doubting Thomas.”   Perhaps even worse, because we read this story every year on the Sunday after Easter there is little chance that he will ever live down this nickname.   

In defense of Thomas, I would like to suggest that he is not so much a doubter as he is a realist.   Thomas had accepted the hard and ugly truth of Jesus’ death, and he had begun to move ahead.   (I say this because our Gospel today reminds us that he was the only one who was not cowering in fear behind locked doors.)   Also, his statement:  “Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands and put my finger into the nail marks and put my hand into his side, I will not believe” --- while crude --- is merely asking for a proof similar to what the other disciples had already seen and experienced.  

When we think of Thomas, it is important to remember that we have grown up with a belief in Jesus’ resurrection.   If we can put ourselves in his shoes, however, we can perhaps begin to grasp what an unprecedented, unexpected, astonishing, miracle Jesus’ resurrection was.   From this perspective, I wonder if most of us --- like Thomas who, unlike the other disciples hadn’t seen the risen Lord  --- wouldn’t ask for a bit more “proof” before believing wholeheartedly in Jesus’ resurrection.  

Our first reading this Sunday is from the Acts of the Apostles.  It moves us quickly from the resurrection to the life of the early Christian community.   It begins with the unequivocal statement:  “The community of believers was of one heart and mind……………...” 

Our second reading this Sunday is taken from the first letter of St. John.  (Our second readings throughout the Easter season will be taken from this letter.)  In the section of this letter which we read this weekend, John reminds us that we show our love for God and the children of God not just by knowing, but by keeping the commandments of God.  

Questions for Discussion/Reflection

  1. Alfred Tennyson once said:  “There lives more faith in honest doubt, believe me, than in half the creeds.”  Do you agree or disagree?
  2. What would you say to someone who had difficulty believing in the resurrection?  
  3. What can we do today to make the community of believers of one mind and heart?   

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