Archives: October 2018

The Together in Hope Project has orchestrated three concerts in Rome and an entourage of ecumenical visitors, including 64 choir members and 120 goodwill ambassadors.

Standing in front of the conductor’s podium will be Teri Larson, music director of the Basilica of St. Mary in Minneapolis, and Mark Stover, who recently was the conductor of the St. Olaf Chapel Choir in Northfield.

Full article

http://www.startribune.com/minnesota-choir-heads-to-vatican-in-support-of-christian-unity/498734481/

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.   
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/110418.cfm 

Our Gospel this Sunday is very familiar.  For this reason it would be easy not to give it a lot of thought or attention.  It is such an important Gospel, though, that I would hope we would take a few moments to really listen to it so that we can realize anew its important message.   

As this Gospel opens we are told that “one of the scribes came to Jesus and asked him.  “Which is the first of all the commandments?’”   Now this would not have been an unusual question.  At the time of Jesus there were over 600 commands, precepts, and prohibitions in the Jewish law.  Rabbis were often asked about the relative importance of these various commands.   What is unusual is Jesus’ answer.  Jesus does not give just one commandment:  “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all you soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.” but two: “The second is this:  You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”  At this point, we are told that the scribe who originally approached Jesus told him these two commandments are “worth more than all burnt offering and sacrifices.”  Jesus then said to him:  “You are not far from the Kingdom of God.”    

Now certainly both of these commandments had always been part of the Jewish religion.  What was unique in this instance is that Jesus yoked them together.  In essence he was reminding people we can’t love the God we do not see, if we don’t love the neighbor we do see.   

Our first reading this Sunday from the Book of Deuteronomy, provides the background for the Gospel.   In that reading Moses told the people:  “Hear O Israel!  The Lord is our God, the Lord alone!  Therefore you shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heat, with all your soul, and with all your strength.”

Our second reading this Sunday is again taken from the Letter to the Hebrews.  It contrasts Jesus, our high priest, with the priests of the Old Testament: “He has no need, as did the high priests, to offer sacrifice day after day, first for his own sins and then for those of the people;   He did that once for all when he offered himself.”    

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. It is easy to say we love God, but how do we know when we really love God?  
  2. Why is it so much easier to love the God we cannot see, then to love the neighbor we do see? 
  3. I love the image of Jesus offering himself for us.   How would you explain this concept to someone who doesn’t come from a Christian background?    

     

Our new Basilica of Saint Mary app is now available to download for iPhone and Android phones.

Stay connected with notifications, community events, prayers, daily readings, Mass reminders, and much more.

We expect the features and capabilities of our new app to foster a stronger sense of community and faith in the daily lives of all parishioners. The Basilica will be able to communicate quick and easy with all parishioners via messages and notifications to keep you in the loop with what is going on in our parish.

 

 

MyParish app demo screen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MyParish app icon
Apple app store logo
Google play logo

 

 

 

 

The Basilica of Saint Mary will show the film Summer in the Forest, Saturday, October 27, 2018 at 3:00pm. This highly acclaimed, documentary tells the story of L’Arche, an international federation dedicated to the creation and growth of homes, programs, and support networks with people who have intellectual disabilities. Founded in 1964, today it operates in 147 communities in 35 countries, on 5 continents.


This screening is presented by the Disability Awareness Ministry as part of the Basilica’s Disability Awareness month in October. The Disability Awareness Ministry's mission is to remove barriers that prevent the full inclusion of individuals with disabilities and their families in parish life and in the community at large. The Basilica continually strives to make the church and campus facilities accessible to all parishioners and visitors.

 

Summer in the Forest Film

Summer in the Forest 
Basilica of Saint Mary
October 27, 2018 at 3:00pm 
Doors open at 2:30pm 
Free of charge

2017 (NR) 108 min.
French with English subtitles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. 
www.usccb.org/bible/readings/102818.cfm

In this Sunday’s Gospel we encounter Bartimaeus, a blind beggar, who on hearing that Jesus was near began to shout:  “Jesus, son of David, have pity on me.”    Several people rebuked him and told him to be quiet, but he was undeterred.  He kept calling out all the more; “Son of David, have pity on me.”  When Jesus heard him, he called him over.   In response we are told that Bartimaeus “threw aside his cloak, sprang up and came to Jesus.” Jesus then asked him: “What do you want me to do for you?”   Bartimaeus’ response was immediate and clear.  “Master, I want to see.”   Jesus then healed him, and Bartimaeus “followed him on the way.”    

There are three important moments in this story.  The first is Bartimaeus’ persistence in calling out to Jesus.  This reminds us that we too need to be persistent when we cry out to Jesus in prayer.  We need to remember, though, that persistence in prayer always needs to be combined with an openness to how God might respond to that prayer.   Second, I believe the fact that Bartimaeus threw aside his cloak is important.  For a beggar a cloak was vitally important.  Not only was it the target where people could throw their alms, but it was his shelter during the cold night.   By throwing aside his cloak Bartimaeus was clear that he didn’t want anything to hinder him from coming to Jesus.  Third, notice that after he was cured, Bartimaeus did not go his own way, but rather “followed” Jesus on his way.     The encounter with Jesus was so life changing for Bartimaeus that Jesus’ way became his way.  

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of the Prophet Jeremiah.  It announces the return of the Israelites from the Babylonian captivity.  “I will gather them from the ends of the word, with the blind and the lame in their midst.”  

In our second reading this Sunday we continue to read from the Letter to the Hebrews.  In the section we read this weekend we are reminded that Jesus was chosen by God to be our high priest and to intercede for us: “it was not Christ who glorified himself in becoming high priest, but rather the One who said to him: You are my son; this day I have begotten you;”  

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. Bartimaeus would not let anyone deter him from calling out to Jesus.  Have you ever let anyone or anything keep you from calling out to Jesus? 
  2. In the Gospel Bartimaeus threw aside his cloak so that it would not hinder his effort to get to Jesus.  What do you need to throw aside in order to follow Jesus?
  3. What does the phrase “high priest” mean to you?  
     

We begin this month of remembrance with solemn Evening Prayer for all our beloved dead. The names of all those who have died within the last year will be mentioned during the Litany of the Saints. All other names of the faithful departed will be listed in the worship leaflet. If you wish to include names of the faithful departed, please submit names online at mary.org/allsouls or call Wendy at 612.317.3474 by end of day October 25. 

Evening Prayer for All Souls Sunday, November 4, at 3:00pm. 

 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  http://usccb.org/bible/readings/102118.cfm   

Some times it takes us a while to “get it.”   That was certainly the case with the disciples in our Gospel for this weekend.   In the verses immediately preceding this Gospel Jesus has told his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem where the chief priests and the scribes will “hand him over to the Gentiles who will mock him and spit at him, flog him, and finally kill him.”  These are difficult words, made more so by the fact that this is the third time Jesus had predicted his passion and death.   And yet his disciples, in particular James and John, still don’t “get it.”    Even after hearing these words we are told in our Gospel for this weekend that “James and John, the sons of Zebedee, came to Jesus and said to him, ‘Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you.’    Jesus replied, ‘What do you wish me to do for you?’  They answered him, ‘Grant that in your glory we may sit one at your right and the other at your left’”    
Jesus rebuked them and then reminded them that his disciples will find their greatness in suffering and service.    

Our first reading this weekend is taken from the book of the prophet Isaiah.   As was the case several weeks ago, the section read this weekend is part of the Song of the Suffering Servant.   This “song” provided an important basis for our Christian understanding of the mystery of Christ’s suffering and death.  The section we read this weekend reminds us that life can come out of suffering.   “Because of his affliction he shall see the light in fullness of days, though his suffering, my servant shall justify many, and their guilt he shall bear.”  

For our second reading we continue to read from the Letter to the Hebrews.   It reminds us that, although  Jesus is our high priest, he is able to “sympathize with our weakness” because he “has similarly been tested in every way, yet without sin.”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. How would you respond if someone asked you why innocent people suffer?
  2. Have you seen life, or some other good, come out of suffering?
  3. Do you believe that Jesus can sympathize with our weakness?  

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/101418.cfm    

“Good teacher, what must I do to inherit eternal life?”   This was the question the man in our Gospel this Sunday posed to Jesus.  (If we are honest, I suspect that, if we had the opportunity, all of us would love to ask Jesus this question.)   Jesus responded to the man by reminding him of the commandments.   But the man told him:  “Teacher, all of these I have observed from my youth.”   We are then told that Jesus looked at him, loved him and said to him:  “You are lacking in one thing.  Go, sell what you have, and give to the poor and you will have treasure in heaven; then come, follow me.”   In response to this, we are told: “At that statement his face fell, and he went away sad, for he had many possessions.”     

I think there are a couple things that need to be said about this Gospel.  First, the man was obviously very sincere in his question.   I also have to wonder, though, if he wasn’t looking for just “one” thing he could do to guarantee that he would inherit eternal life, and then he could live and do as he pleased.  The reality is, though, that we have to do more than “one” thing to inherit eternal life.   Following Jesus impacts all the whole of our lives --- all that we say and do.   Second, though, I think we also need to be clear that selling all that he had and giving it to the poor was ultimately what the man in this Sunday’s Gospel had to do in order to follow Jesus.  For each of us there is something that ultimately we will have to do follow Jesus.  What this is will be different for each person.   

Our first reading today from the Book of Wisdom, shares the theme of the Gospel.  It reminds us that riches are deemed nothing in comparison to having prudence and wisdom.    

In our second reading today from the Letter to the Hebrews we are reminded that:  “the word of God is living and effective, sharper than any two-edged sword, penetrating even between soul and spirit, joints and marrow, and able to discern reflections and thoughts of the heart.”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. The man in our Gospel this weekend was asked to sell what he had and give to the poor in order to follow Jesus.   What do you think Jesus is asking you to do in order to follow him? 
  2. How would you define prudence and wisdom?
  3. Have you ever felt “convicted” by the word of God?   
     

October is Disability Awareness Month at The Basilica

The Disability Awareness Ministry's mission is to remove barriers that prevent the full inclusion of individuals with disabilities and their families in parish life and in the community at large. The Basilica continually strives to make the church and campus facilities accessible to all parishioners and visitors. Join us as we continue to look at ways to eliminate barriers to participation at The Basilica.
 

Taizé Prayer with Individual Confessions
Saint Joseph Chapel, Ground Level
Tuesday, October 9, 5:30pm
A service of mantra-like singing following communal prayer focused on reconciliation and healing. Braille Leaflet, wheelchair seating, lighting for those with visual impairment are just a few of the ways we are making this prayer service more accessible to all.
 
Disability Awareness Ministry Fair
Sunday, October 14, Following 9:30 and 11:30am Masses
Come down to Teresa of Calcutta Hall for special treats and resource tables featuring organizations with information on breaking down the barriers to participation on many levels. If you have an organization you would like to participate, or for more information, contact Janet.

Documentary Film: Summer in the Forest 
Saturday, October 27, 3:00pm, Teresa of Calcutta Hall, Ground Level
This highly acclaimed, recently released documentary tells the story of L’Arche, an international federation dedicated to the creation and growth of homes, programs, and support networks with people who have intellectual disabilities. It was founded in 1964, and is operating today in 147 communities in 35 countries, on 5 continents. Doors open at 2:30pm and special treats will be available. 
 
Book Club: The Road to Daybreak
Before coming to see Summer in the Forest, we invite you to join us in reading The Road to Daybreak by Henri J. M. Nouwen. This book documents the author’s spiritual journey that took him to the L’Arche community in Trosly, France and the impact it made on him for the remainder of his life. If you would like to purchase a copy, please contact Janet.

 
For more information, contact Janet.

Syrian Archbishop to Speak at the University of St. Thomas
Archbishop of Damascus Samir Nassar will discuss from his eyewitness perspective the impact of Syria’s civil war on both the Church and society in that country.
 
St. Paul/Minneapolis - His Excellency, the Most Reverend Samir Nassar, Archbishop of Damascus since 2006, has witnessed first-hand the devastation caused by the civil war raging in Syria since 2011. No sector of society has escaped unharmed, including the Church. Families, children, and especially young people, whose future livelihood within Syria has become precarious, have suffered the most.  Over two separate events on Thursday, November 15, Archbishop Nassar will share his experiences helping his church communities survive and constructively respond to the barbarities and deprivations of war. Both events are free and open to the public.
 
The first event is an informal discussion with Archbishop Nassar, entitled “Enveloped by War: The Church in Syria’s Civil Conflict.” It will be held in the auditorium of the O’Shaughnessy Educational Center on the St. Paul Campus from 11:45AM to 1:15PM. Archbishop Nassar will share stories, and invite questions, about how the war has affected churches in his Archdiocese, and throughout Syria, and how both he and those churches have responded to the almost complete breakdown of civil society.
 
The second event will be a panel discussion and public dialogue on how the Church in Syria might contribute to the rebuilding of Syrian civil society.  “Binding Wounds, Building Bridges in a War-Ravaged Land: An Evening with The Most Reverend Samir Nassar, Archbishop of Damascus,” will take place at 7:30PM in Schulze Hall on the Minneapolis campus of the University of St. Thomas. This event will include many members of the wider Twin Cities community. 
 
The primary sponsor for both events is The Institute for Catholicism and Citizenship at the University of St. Thomas, with assistance provided by the University of St. Thomas’ Office for Mission, the Departments of Theology, History, Justice and Peace Studies, and Catholic Studies. Archbishop Nassar’s visit to the Twin Cities is being sponsored by a number of different national and local agencies and organizations: Catholic Relief Services, Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, the Archdiocese of St. Paul/Minneapolis, the Center for Mission, St. Maron’s Maronite Catholic Church, and the Basilica of St. Mary.
 
For more information, press only:
Paul J. Wojda, Ph.D.
651-962-5385
pjwojda@stthomas.edu
 
Evening Ecumenical/Inter-faith Prayer Service
Wednesday, November 14
St. Maron's Church 
600 University Ave NE, Minneapolis, MN 55413
Come together to pray for peace and for refugees. 
 
Binding Wounds, Building Bridges in a War-Ravaged Land:
An Evening with The Most Reverend Samir Nassar, Archbishop of Damascus, Syria
Discussion about how the Church in Syria might contribute to the rebuilding of Syrian civil society.
Thursday, November 15
7:30pm 
Schultze Hall, University of St. Thomas, Minneapolis campus
Open to the public
 
The University of St. Thomas is honored to host Archbishop Nassar
Sponsored by the Institute for Catholicism and Citizenship
 
 
 
More about Archbishop Nassar: