Archives: October 2019

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  http://usccb.org/bible/readings/110319.cfm  

This Sunday we celebrate the 31st Sunday in Ordinary Time.   In our Gospel this Sunday we read the familiar story of Zacchaeus, a tax collector, but more importantly the chief tax collector, and therefore a very wealthy man.   Since taxes were no more popular at the time of Jesus than they are today, Zacchaeus, the chief tax collector, would have been held in low esteem, if not contempt, by the people of that time.  When it came to Jesus, though, Zacchaeus was not concerned about people’s opinion of him.   We are told that “he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree in order to see Jesus.”   

When Jesus came to the spot where Zacchaeus was, he said:  “Zacchaeus, come down quickly, for today I must stay at your house.”   People began to grumble at this, but Zacchaeus “stood there and said to the Lord, ‘Behold, half of my possessions, Lord, I shall give to the poor, and if I have extorted anything from anyone I shall repay it four times over.”    Clearly the encounter with Jesus changed Zacchaeus’ life.   

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of Wisdom.   It shares the theme of the Gospel in that it reminds people that:  “you (Lord) have mercy on all, because you can do all things, and you overlook people’s sins that they may repent…………………Therefore you rebuke offenders little by little, warn them and remind them of the sins they are committing, that they may abandon their wickedness and believe in you, O Lord.”    The message of both the first reading and the Gospel is clear.  God wants the sinner to be saved and will give ample opportunity for people to turn away from their sins and back to God. 

Our second reading this Sunday is taken from the second Letter of St. Paul to the Thessalonians.    In the section we read today, Paul prays for the Thessalonians (and us) that “our God may make you worthy of his calling and powerfully bring to fulfillment every good purpose and every effort of faith…………”

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. Zacchaeus was unwilling to let his short stature keep him from Jesus.  What keeps you from Jesus?
  2. The encounter with Jesus changed Zacchaeus’ life.  Where changes might you need to make in your life need for you to follow Jesus more closely?
  3. I love the image of God making us worthy of God’s calling, but how does God do this?    

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste in into your browser. http://usccb.org/bible/readings/102719.cfm 

In our Gospel this weekend Jesus addressed a parable to "those who were convinced of their own righteousness and despised everyone else.”  The parable begins:  “two men who went up to the temple to pray:  one was a Pharisee, the other a tax collector.”  We are told that the Pharisee  “Spoke this prayer to himself.  ‘O God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity  --- greedy, dishonest,  adulterous --- or even like this tax collector.   I fast twice a week.  I pay tithes on my whole income.’”    The tax collector, though, “stood off at a  distance, and would not even raise his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast and prayed, ‘O God, be merciful to me a sinner.’”  

The difference between these two people in terms of their prayer is striking.   The Pharisee was not so much praying as he was giving a report on his “supposed” goodness.  The tax collector, though, had a clear since of his own sinfulness and his need for God’s mercy.   His prayer was honest and heartfelt.  

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of Sirach.   It shares the theme of our Gospel in regard to prayer.   It is clear that “The prayer of the lowly pierces the clouds, it does not rest till it reaches its goal.”   

In our second reading this Sunday, we continue to read from the second Letter of St. Paul to Timothy.   In it Paul writes very personally about feeling abandoned by those who whose support he had anticipated.   He also is clear, though, about his trust in God: “The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat and will bring me safe to his heavenly kingdom.  To him be glory forever and ever.  Amen.” 
Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. I don’t think many of us pray as the Pharisee did in our Gospel for this weekend.  (Few of us are that grandiose.)   I also don’t think that many of us pray as the tax collector did.  (Few of us are that honest.)   How do you approach God in prayer?
  2. How do you know when God has heard your prayer?
  3. Even though he felt abandoned, Paul was sure of God’s presence and grace.  Have you ever experienced God’s grace at a time when you have felt abandoned or betrayed.?    

“But when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?” (Luke 18:8)

These last Sundays of the liturgical year are filled with apocalyptic imagery as they speak about the end of time. This is intended to gradually prepare us for the last Sunday of the Liturgical Year, the Solemnity of Christ the King. My granny Yolanda loved and hated these Sundays, for on the one hand she anticipated the end of time while on the other hand she feared it. Her big question always was: “When I see God face-to-face will my faith have been deep enough and my love been generous enough?”

Today’s Gospel ends with a somewhat ominous question: “But when the Son of Man comes, will he find faith on earth?” (Luke 18:8) This question or a similar question: “Are people losing their faith” is on the mind of many of us. Several studies on religious behavior indicate that there is a clear downward trend in terms of religious identification. Many churches see their congregations grow older and smaller and eventually have to close. And where in the past the Catholic Church wielded great influence in many parts of the world, that is no longer the case today. Is this cause for alarm?

In an interview with America Magazine, recently created Cardinal Michael Czerny, S.J. stated that the Church “is not here to run the world… but the world should feel that the Church, that Christ, that God is with us, with them, as we face the great difficulties of our lives and of our times.” He went on to say that the mission of the Church “is the embodiment or the implementation of the Gospel in human society and human history. That is what we are really about.” In other words, we are foremost called to be Christ in the world, not to explain Christ to the world or impose Christ on the world.

So, when Christ returns at the end of time will He find faith on earth? He may not find a lot of people who are able to speak to the fineries of Christology or Pneumatology. But hopefully he will find many of us embodying and implementing the Gospel in our world. And paraphrasing the Gospel of Matthew: by our fruits He will know us (Matt. 7:20). For indeed, “Ubi caritas est vera, Deus ibi est” or “Where true charity is, there is God.” So let’s not dwell on loss of power or numbers and let us commit ourselves to embodying the Gospel so others will take note of us and want to learn about what motivates us, i.e. our faith, not unlike what happened during the time of the Apostles. Words rarely convert, actions do.

So, in response to today’s Gospel question and in anticipation of the end of time I think I will adopt my granny’s question yet turn it around a bit:  “When I see God face-to-face will my love have been generous enough and my faith been deep enough?"

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste in into your browser.

http://usccb.org/bible/readings/102019.cfm

 

This Sunday we celebrate the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time.   In our Gospel this Sunday we read the parable of the unjust judge.  This parable is unique to Luke.   It is introduced with the words:  “Jesus told his disciples a parable about the necessity for them to pray always.”   He then tells the story of a widow who continually comes to an unjust judge demanding her rights.    Eventually the judge said to himeself:  “While it is true that I neither fear God nor respect any human being, because this widow keeps bothering me I shall deliver a just decision for her lest she finally come and strike me.”   

 

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of Exodus.   It tells the story of a battle between the forces of Amalek and those of Israel.   During the battle: “As long as Moses kept his hands raised up, Israel had the better of the fight, but when he let his hands rest, Amalek had the better of the fight.”   So “Aaron and Hur supported his hands, one on one side and one on the other, so this hands remained steady till sunset.” 

 

The Gospel and the first reading together remind us of two essential elements of prayer:  1. persistence; and 2. the support of others.   At times it is easy to become discouraged in prayer.   The support of others, though, can help us persevere in prayer. We persevere in prayer, though, not to change God’s mind, but to discern how God might be responding to our prayer. 

 

In our second reading this Sunday we continue to read from the second Letter of St. Paul to Timothy.   In it Paul urges Timothy to “proclaim the word; be persistent whether it is convenient or inconvenient; convince, reprimand, encourage through all patience and teaching.”    

 

 

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

 

 

1.  Has there been a time when you have been discouraged in prayer?  What helped you to persist?

 

2.  When have others been helpful to you in your spiritual life?

 

3.  Are you persistent in prayer whether it is convenient or inconvenient?   

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  http://usccb.org/bible/readings/101319.cfm  

The Gospel and our first reading this Sunday deal with the healing of lepers.   In the Gospel, ten lepers meet Jesus as he is entering a village.  “They stood at a distance from him and raised their voices, saying, ‘Jesus, Master! Have pity on us!’”    Jesus told them “Go show yourselves to the priests.”    They set off “And one of them, realizing he had been healed, returned, glorifying God in a loud voice, and he fell at the feet of Jesus and thanked him.  He was a Samaritan.”    In response, Jesus wondered aloud where the other nine were.   Then he said to the one leper who returned, “Stand up and go; your faith has saved you.”   

In the first reading Naaman, the army commander of the king of Aram, is cured of his leprosy.   He asked if he could give a gift to Elisha for his cure, but Elisha declined the offer.    In response Naaman said:  “If you will not accept, please let me, your servant, have two mule-loads of earth, for I will not longer offer holocaust or sacrifice to any other god except to the Lord.”   

The message of both these readings is clear.  When we realize that God has touched our lives, it should change us.   The challenge, of course, is to realize when God has touched our lives, and then to be open to God’s grace changing our lives.   

In our second reading this Sunday we continue to read from the second Letter of St. Paul to Timothy.    Paul is suffering for the Gospel “even to the point of chains, like a criminal.”   But he reminds Timothy that “the word of God is not chained.”   And it is the word of God that brings us salvation in Christ Jesus.   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. Have there been times/moments when you have felt God touch your life?                       
  2. Why do you think only one leper came back to thank Jesus?
  3. Paul suffered because he preached the Gospel.  Have you ever suffered any repercussions because of your beliefs?