Fr. Bauer's Blog

 

Basilica Community,

I hope this message finds you and your family continuing to stay well during these very challenging times.

I’d like to begin today by thanking all of those who have made a commitment of financial support to our Basilica Fund. Our annual fund provides 79% of The Basilica’s operating budget. Your contributions to the annual fund allow us to offer the many programs, services, and ministries that are at the heart of our Basilica community.

If you have already made a commitment of reoccurring financial support for our Basilica community, please know of my gratitude. I hope you will continue it and if possible increase it. Your commitment of financial support, no matter how small, or how large, enables us to continue to do those things that fulfill our vision here at The Basilica.

If you are not able to make an ongoing financial commitment, I ask you to give what you can, when you can. I thank you in advance for whatever financial support you can commit to. Please know whatever you are able to give will be appreciated.

If you are not able to make a financial commitment or even to contribute occasionally, I ask you to pray for our parish and for your fellow parishioners. Please know your prayers are both needed and deeply appreciated. If you are experiencing some financial difficulties, please contact our St. Vincent de Paul Ministry. We may be able to help you or refer you to someone who can.

In other news, as I hope you know, our 11:30am and 4:30pm Masses on Sunday are now open to the public. If you are not able to join us for one of these Masses, I invite you to join us via livestream for our 9:30am Mass. In addition to our 11:30am and 4:30pm Sunday Masses, our 7:00am and our Noon weekday Masses are also open to the public. We do ask that you pre-register for our Sunday Masses and our Noon Masses, but you can register for the 7:00am Mass at the door.

On a related note, anticipating the cold weather, this past Monday we moved our check-in tables for all of our liturgies, with the exception of the 7:00am daily Mass, to the ground level doors of The Basilica. This area is large enough so that people won’t have to wait in the cold to check-in. The doors for check-in will be the southwest ground level doors near the circle garden and flag pole.

Also, as I have mentioned previously, it is our hope that within the next couple of weeks a Needlepoint Bipolar Ionization Unit will be installed in the church. This unit will clean the air in The Basilica and the lower level of viruses (including SARS and COVID-19), as well as allergens and mold. This technology is already being used at places like the Mayo Clinic, local schools, and museums.

It will be a tremendous help in ensuring the safety and well being of all those who come to The Basilica. We are very blessed and fortunate that this project, along with the tuck pointing being done on the exterior of our Basilica, are being paid for by The Basilica Landmark.

Finally, as always, if you have questions or concerns about anything that is happening at The Basilica, please contact me at the parish office or send me an email. My contact information is available on our parish website.

 
 
 

Loving God, your light shines in our darkness and assures us that you are present with us and that your powerful grace transforms our fear into hope.

May we join with our Holy Father, Francis, in spreading a "contagion" of hope "from heart to heart."

Protect all your selfless servants who continue to serve the needs of the most vulnerable with their hands and heart.

Give our elected leaders wisdom of heart in decision-making that the common good of our human family may be achieved and the gift of each person's human dignity respected.

May the fire of your love burn within our hearts so that we may give witness to the mystery of your love among us and within us.
Amen

 

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Many years ago I used to give a talk to seminarians about taking responsibility for their spiritual growth after their ordination. One of the recommendations I offered them was that when they prepared their homilies each week they spend some time reflecting on the scriptures for the coming Sunday with some of their parishioners. 

My reasoning was that the scriptures—as the inspired word of God—speak to each person differently. I reminded them that as celibate males it can be helpful to hear how the scriptures speak to women, to those who are married, and those of different ages. I also told them that over the years, I have been continually and pleasantly surprised—and often humbled—by the insights and wisdom of parishioners as they shared how a particular scriptural passage spoke to them. I always closed by telling them that it was the height of foolishness and hubris for a priest, deacon, or bishop to think that in preparing a homily they can’t benefit from the insights of others. 

Now, I know most people reading this column aren’t preparing to become preachers. But you do participate in the homily each week, by listening to it and reflecting on how it affects or reflects your life. Given this, your insights are important and can provide a grounding in reality for the homilist. 

I would hope parishioners would feel confident and comfortable enough to let a preacher know when he has missed the mark and failed to tie the homily to your lived experience. A good preacher can learn from feedback from his parishioners. That doesn’t mean just telling a priest his homily was “good” or “bad.” Instead it may involve telling the priest about a specific point that resonated with you or raising a question about something you didn’t understand. 

Preaching is an art not a science. Preparing a homily takes time and effort, and an openness to God’s grace and the guidance of the Holy Spirit. In my experience, however, priests often face three major pitfalls in regard to preaching. 1. Superficiality; 2. Splitting; and 3. Spilling. Let me say a word about each of these. 

Superficiality occurs when the preacher spouts glib bromides and tired maxims instead of taking the time to do background reading and research, prayerful reflection on the scriptures, and welcoming and listening to the insights of others. It may be easy to be sweet and sugary in preaching, but the people in the pews deserve better. 

Splitting occurs when the preacher tells people how they should live and act, but isn’t living and acting that way himself. In its worst form, this has occurred with abusive priests, but it also occurs when a preacher is telling people to be good, kind, forgiving, generous and loving, and isn’t doing this in his own life. People pick up on this almost immediately. It takes a certain amount of humility to be able to say: We need to do these things and I struggle with them in my own life. This is a vital aspect of preaching. 

Spilling in preaching is perhaps the worst offense for preachers. Spilling occurs when a preacher decides to talk about their personal issues, or uses the pulpit to express his own opinion on a political issue. For example, when I was growing up I remember hearing a homily on the evils of chlorinated water. I also have heard priests preach about how poorly they have been treated by people in their parish. 

To this day, I have no idea where these priests found these themes in the scriptures, but nonetheless they preached on them. These are good examples of spilling. At base, spilling is an abuse of the power of the pulpit. The person who is spilling may use the scriptures as a springboard, but in reality all they are doing is using the pulpit to promote their own ideas and agenda. It is always and everywhere, wrong. 

The power of preaching is not to deliver holy truth from on high, but to connect people’s everyday experience with the extraordinary experience and presence of God. Preparing and giving a homily should be an opportunity and an occasion for spiritual growth. Most priests I know take preaching very seriously and work hard at it. I suspect, though, that there have been times when we have all been guilty of superficiality, splitting, or spilling. And unfortunately, some do this on a regular basis. One of the best ways to prevent this is to take the time and make the effort to listen to what the scriptures are saying to others, to consider the lives of the people in the pews, and to connect God to their everyday live. That can help us hear more clearly and keenly what God has to say to us in the scriptures. 

 

 

Basilica Community,

I hope this message finds you and your family continuing to stay well during these very challenging times.

Today I’d like to update you on the activities going on at The Basilica. While most of these activities are being done virtually, we have resumed some activities. For example, last Sunday we resumed our 4:30pm Mass on Sunday afternoon. Both this Mass and our 11:30am Mass on Sunday are open to the public, but we do ask you to pre-register in the unlikely event that we need to contact you.

We will continue to livestream our 9:30am Mass. At the present time, however, this Mass isn’t open for public worship. Both our 7:00am and our Noon daily Masses are open to the public. We do ask that you pre-register for the Noon Mass, but you can register for the 7:00am Mass at the door.

On a related note, anticipating the colder weather, beginning October 12, we will be moving our check-in tables for all of our liturgies, with the exception of the 7:00am daily Mass, to the ground level doors of The Basilica. This area is large enough so that people won’t have to wait in the cold to check-in. The doors for check-in will be the southwest ground level doors near the circle garden and flag pole. Again we will begin using this area for check-in beginning October 12.

We have also begun to resume some activities on our campus on a case-by-case basis. Our standard will be ensuring the safety, security, and well-being of the participants or attendees. When there are activities on our campus, we will use the same protocols we currently use to check people in for the celebration of daily and Sunday Mass, and weddings and funerals.

In regard to our beautiful Basilica building, the tuck-pointing work on the west exterior wall of The Basilica above the doors near the Mary Garden continues. This work is needed to seal the mortar and prevent further water damage. As part of this project, we will also install an additional 10-12 moisture monitors in the church interior, and evaluate next steps for moisture testing and work needed to continue to dry out the church interior.

Additionally, within the next month, we hope to install a Needlepoint Bipolar Ionization Unit in the Church. This unit will clean the air in The Basilica and the lower level of viruses (including SARS and COVID-19), as well as allergens and mold. This technology is already being used at places like the Mayo Clinic, local schools, and museums. It will be a tremendous help in ensuring the safety and well being of all those who come to The Basilica. We are very blessed and fortunate that both of these projects are being paid for by The Basilica Landmark.

Finally, I want to let you know that I will be on retreat next week, so I won’t have an update next week. Please remember me in your prayers while I am on retreat, and know that you will be remembered gratefully in mine. As always, if you have questions or concerns about anything that is happening at The Basilica, please contact me at the parish office or send me an email. My contact information is available on our parish website.

 

Holy Mary, full of God’s presence during the day of your life, you accepted with full humility the Father’s will, and the devil was never capable of tying you up with his confusion.

Once with your Son you interceded for our difficulties, and full of kindness and patience, you gave us example of how to untie the knots in our life. By remaining forever Our Mother, you put in order and make more clear the ties that link us to the Lord.

Holy Mother, Mother of God and our Mother, to you who untie with a motherly heart the knots of our life, we pray to you to receive in your hands all those severely impacted by the Coronavirus, and to free us of the knots and confusion with which our enemy attacks.

Through your grace, your intercession and your example deliver us from all evil, Our Lady, and untie the knots that prevent us from being united with God, so that we, free from sin and error, may find Him in all things, may have our hearts placed in Him, and may serve Him always in our brothers and sisters. Amen..

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Basilica Community,

I hope this message finds you and your family continuing to stay well during these very challenging times.

As I have mentioned previously, at the present time, most of our activities, with the exception of the celebration of the sacraments, is being done virtually.

Although one of the activities that definitely is not taking place virtually, is the ongoing maintenance of our beautiful Basilica. A couple of weeks ago, we began some masonry restoration work on the west exterior wall of The Basilica above the doors near the Mary Garden.

This work is needed to seal the mortar and prevent further water damage. As part of this project, we will also install an additional 10-12 moisture monitors in the church interior, and evaluate next steps for moisture testing and work needed to continue to dry out the church interior.

Additionally, within the next month, we hope to install a Needlepoint Bipolar Ionization Unit in the Church. This unit will clean the air in The Basilica and the lower level of viruses (including SARS and COVID-19), as well as allergens and mold. This technology is already being used at places like the Mayo Clinic, local schools, and museums.

It will be a tremendous help in ensuring the safety and well being of all those who come to The Basilica. We are very blessed and fortunate that both of these projects are being paid for by The Basilica Landmark.

On another note, beginning this coming Sunday, September 27 we will resume our 4:30pm Mass on Sunday afternoon. As with our 11:30am Sunday Mass and our daily noon Mass, you will need to pre-register to attend this Mass. You can do this via our website or by calling the parish office. We ask people to pre-register so that we will have your contact information in the unlikely event that we need to do contact tracing.

On a related note, anticipating the cold weather, beginning October 12, we will be moving our check-in tables for liturgies to the ground level of The Basilica. This area is large enough so that people won’t have to wait in the cold to check-in. The doors for check-in will be the west ground level doors near the circle garden and flag pole. Again we will begin using this area for check-in beginning October 12.

Finally, we have also begun to consider resuming some activities on our campus on a case by case basis. Our standard will be ensuring the safety, security, and well being of the participants or attendees. When there are activities on our campus, we will use the same protocols we currently use to check people in for the celebration of daily and Sunday Mass, and weddings and funerals.

As always, if you have questions or concerns about anything that is happening at The Basilica, please contact me at the parish office or send me an email. My contact information is available on our parish website.

Thank you for your continued prayers and your financial support. Please know they are appreciated more than you know.

 

Dear Lord,
At this time of pandemic,
Let us foster respect and solidarity with others, especially those who are weak or poor.
Let us remain calm and ignore unsubstantiated rumors.
Let us take advantage of living together as a family.
Let us attend to moments of prayer.
Let us cultivate responsibility, patience and hope.
Amen.

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Basilica Community,

I hope this message finds you and your family continuing to stay well during these very challenging times.

As I mentioned previously, at the present time almost all of our activities at The Basilica, with the exception of the celebration of the sacraments, are being done virtually. However, given our success in regard to opening The Basilica for daily and Sunday Masses, it makes sense that we explore whether or not we can resume other activities on our campus.

In this regard, a little over a week ago we resumed our 7:00am Mass Monday through Friday. You don’t have to pre-register for this Mass, but you will need to register on-site prior to Mass.

Beginning Sunday, September 27 we will resume our 4:30pm Mass on Sunday afternoon. As with our 11:30am Sunday Mass and our daily Noon Mass, you will need to pre-register to attend this Mass. You can do this via our website or by calling the parish office. We ask people to pre-register so that we will have your contact information in the unlikely event that we need to do contact tracing. We will continue to livestream our 9:30am Mass on Sundays.

We have also begun to consider resuming some activities on our campus on a case by case basis. Our standard will be ensuring the safety, security, and well-being of the participants or attendees. When there are activities on our campus, we will use the same protocols we currently use to check people in for the celebration of daily and Sunday Masses, weddings, and funerals.

As I mentioned last week, one of the activities that definitely is not taking place virtually is the ongoing maintenance of our beautiful Basilica. This past week we began some masonry restoration work on the west exterior wall of The Basilica above the doors near the Mary Garden. This work is needed to seal the mortar and prevent further water damage.

As part of this project, we will also install an additional 10-12 moisture monitors in the church interior, and evaluate next steps for moisture testing and work needed to continue to dry out the church interior. We are very blessed and fortunate that this work is being paid for by The Basilica Landmark.

As always, if you have questions or concerns about anything that is happening at The Basilica, please contact me at the parish office or send me an email. My contact information is available on our parish website.

As always, if you would like further information about our protocols or if you have questions or concerns, please contact me at the parish office or send me an email. My contact information is available on our parish website.

Thank you for your continued prayers and your financial support. Please know they are appreciated more than you know.

 

God of all hope we call on you today.
We pray for those who are living in fear:
Fear of illness, fear for loved ones, fear of other’s reactions to them.
May your Spirit give us a sense of calmness and peace.

We pray for your church in this time of uncertainty.
For those people who are worried about attending worship.
For those needing to make decisions in order to care for other
For those who will feel more isolated by not being able to attend.
Grant us your wisdom.
Holy God, we remember that you have promised that
Nothing will separate us from your love – demonstrated to us in Jesus Christ.
Help us turn our eyes, hearts and minds to you.
Amen

 

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Sacred Heart of Jesus stained glass window

Our Sins Have Been Forgiven

“It shouldn't be that easy.”  Those are the very words an individual spoke several years just after I prayed the words of absolution in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. “It shouldn't be that easy.”

On the one hand this person was right, of course. From our human perspective, the forgiveness of our sins shouldn't be that easy. We are used to working hard, paying our way, earning our keep. Given this, it only makes sense that we should “do” something to merit the forgiveness of our sins. As humans, we take it for granted that you don't get something for nothing. And isn’t this as it should be? After all, wasn't it St. Paul who said that “those who don't work shouldn't eat?” (2 Thessalonians chapter 3:10)  Shouldn't we have to do something in order for God to forgive our sins?

The answer, of course, is yes. But in order to understand what we have to do, we need to look at things from God's perspective, not from our human perspective. From God's perspective, the forgiveness of our sins is dependent on nothing more—but also nothing less—than our sorrow for our sins. If we are truly sorry for our sins, if it is our will and desire that we try to sin no more, then that is all God asks of us. In return, God offers us forgiveness and the grace we need to rise from our sins to try again to live as God's sons and daughters.

Does this mean that once our sins have been forgiven God expects us never to sin again. Of course it doesn’t.  God made us and God knows us—personally and intimately. As a result, God also knows that despite our best efforts we will continue to sin and fail. But—and this is the important part—there is no sin too great as to be beyond the power of God's grace. In fact the only barrier to the forgiveness of our sins is the hardness of our hearts, and/or our inability to accept the forgiveness that is offered to us.   

When we come to the Sacrament of Reconciliation, and openly, honestly, and  trustingly confess our sins, our sins are really and truly forgiven. It shouldn't be that easy—but because of Jesus Christ, it is.  

 

 

Basilica Community,

I hope this message finds you and your family continuing to stay well during these very challenging times.

As I mentioned previously, at the present time almost everything we are doing, with the exception of the celebration of the sacraments, is being done virtually. And we anticipate that this will continue for the foreseeable future.

However, given our success in regard to opening The Basilica for daily and Sunday Masses, it makes sense that we explore whether or not we can resume other activities on our campus. In this regard, yesterday we resumed our 7:00am Monday through Friday Mass. You don’t have to pre-register for this Mass, but you will need to register onsite prior to Mass.

One of the ministries we have resumed is the celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Confessions will be heard in the chapel from 9:00 to 10:00am. Our protocol for this is posted on our website under the sacraments tab, or you can call the liturgy office for information.

We have also begun to consider resuming some activities on our campus on a case by case basis. Our standard will be ensuring the safety, security, and well being of the participants or attendees. When there are activities on our campus, we will use the same protocols we currently use to check people in for the celebration of daily and Sunday Mass, and weddings and funerals. We will ask for a list of attendees and their contact information ahead of time, in the unlikely event that we need to do contact tracing.

One of the activities that definitely is not taking place virtually is the ongoing maintenance of our beautiful Basilica. This week we began some masonry restoration work on the west exterior wall of The Basilica above the doors near the Mary Garden. This work is needed to seal the mortar and prevent further water damage. As part of this project, we will also install an additional 10-15 moisture monitors in the church interior, and evaluate next steps for moisture testing and work needed to continue to dry out the church interior. We are very blessed and fortunate that this work is being paid for by The Basilica Landmark.

As always, if you would like further information about our protocols or if you have questions or concerns, please contact me at the parish office or send me an email. My contact information is available on our parish website.

Finally, as I have mentioned previously, in the event that there is an outbreak of COVID-19 traceable to The Basilica, we will need to reconsider the decision to open The Basilica for public worship. Also if there is a surge in cases of the Coronavirus, we will follow any directives and restrictions from the city of Minneapolis or the state. I will alert you as soon as possible, should either of these things occur.

Thank you for your continued prayers and your financial support. Please know they are appreciated more than you know.

 

God of life,
you have promised to be with us always,
Help us to be aware of your presence in these difficult days.
Give us
clarity in our minds,
strength in our work and discernment,
rest as we sleep,
peace in our minds and hearts.

Be with those
who need your help
and help us to do share your love our families, our friends, neighbors, our co-workers, and all those we encounter.

We ask this through Christ our Lord. Amen.

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I hope this message finds you and your family continuing to stay well during these challenging times.

As I mentioned last week, almost everything we are doing, with the exception of the celebration of the sacraments, is being done virtually. While this has the advantage of keeping everyone safe and secure, the disadvantage is not having personal contact. I suspect we all miss that. I know I do.

Going forward into the fall, we still anticipate that for the foreseeable future, most of our ministries, services, and programs will continue to be done virtually. However, given our success in regard to opening The Basilica for Sunday and daily Mass, it makes sense that we explore whether or not we can resume other activities on our campus.

We plan to resume our 7:00am morning Mass Monday through Friday beginning on September 9, the Wednesday after Labor Day. We have also begun to consider resuming some activities on our campus on a case by case basis. Our standard will be ensuring the safety, security, and well-being of the participants or attendees.

Now as I said, most of our activities will continue to be done virtually, but we do need to be responsive to people’s needs and open to their ideas. Given the recent increase in the cases of Coronavirus in Minnesota, we will need to continue to be cautious in resuming any activities on The Basilica campus.

When there are activities on our campus, we will use the same protocols that we currently use to check people in for the celebration of daily and Sunday Mass, weddings, and funerals. We will also ask for a list of attendees and their contact information ahead of time, in the unlikely event that we need to do contact tracing.

One of the ministries we have resumed is the celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Confessions will be heard in the chapel from 9:00 to 10:00am. Our protocol for this is posted on our website under the sacraments tab, or you can call the liturgy office for information.

As always, if you would like further information about our protocols or if you have questions or concerns, please contact me at the parish office or send me an email. My contact information is available on our parish website.

Finally, as I have mentioned previously, in the event that there is an outbreak of COVID-19 traceable to The Basilica, we will need to reconsider the decision to open The Basilica for public worship. Also if there is a surge in cases of the Coronavirus, we will follow any directives and restrictions from the city of Minneapolis or the state. I will alert you as soon as possible, should either of these things occur.

Thank you for your continued prayers and your financial support. Please know they are appreciated more than you know.

 

Holy Virgin Mary,

Queen of the Angels and Mother of the Americas.

We fly to you today as your beloved children.

We ask you to intercede for us with your Son,

as you did at the wedding in Cana.

Pray for us, loving Mother,

and gain for our nation and world,

and for all our families and loved ones,

the protection of the holy angels,

that we may be spared the worst of this illness.

For those already afflicted,

we ask you to obtain the grace of healing and deliverance.

Hear the cries of those who are vulnerable and fearful,

wipe away their tears and help them to trust.

In this time of trial and testing,

teach all of us to love one another and to be patient and kind.

Help us to bring the peace of Jesus to our land and to our hearts.

We come to you with confidence,

knowing that you truly are our compassionate mother,

health of the sick and cause of our joy.

Shelter us under the mantle of your protection,

keep us in the embrace of your arms,

help us always to know the love of your Son, Jesus.

Amen.

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Pastoring during a pandemic is a unique, one of kind, never to be forgotten experience. I’m sure that all of us could substitute our own word for “pastoring” and this statement would ring true for all of us. We are in uncharted waters and trying to find our way through them without GPS or even a compass to guide us. Certainly there was nothing in my seminary experience or in my years of ministry that I can look to or lean on for guidance. And yet, somehow we are finding our way through it—often in fits and starts—occasionally stumbling—but, at least in my case, always with a clear sense that I am not alone. I feel the support of family, friends, colleagues, and parishioners. Also, and as importantly, I also have a clear sense that God is with me—that God is with all of us—during this time. 

Now, I would like to tell you that the sense that God is with us during this time is always evident and enduring. Truth be told, however, there are times when I struggle to find and/or recognize God’s presence. Usually these times don’t last long, but they are real. Perhaps it is just me, but it is hard to look at the face of pain and suffering and death, and not wonder if and where God is in the midst of it. When I take these times with me to prayer, though, most often I find and feel God’s peaceful presence. And I realize anew that God is with us and for us, and has not and will not leave us alone. 

Certainly there are people who would argue that the current pandemic is proof positive that God either can’t or won’t do something to “fix” it and make it better. I suspect there is little that I can say to these people that would change their mind. For myself, though, there are many things that are signs of God’s presence and grace, and I can’t ignore them. An ongoing challenge, though, is that I need to look through the “eyes of faith” in order to recognize these signs. 

Now there is a need for clarity here. Seeing things through the eyes of faith does not mean wearing rose colored glasses and approaching things with a certain naiveté. Rather faith is the lens that helps all of us to see God’s hand at work in our lives and in our world, perhaps especially when that presence is not immediately obvious. As we read in Hebrews 11:1 “Faith is confident assurance of what we hope for; conviction about things we do not see.” Seeing with the eyes of faith, then, is nothing more, but certainly nothing less than believing that the God who loved us and our world into existence, will always hold us in love, and ultimately will bring us home to live with God forever. 

Faith isn’t always an easy proposition, but I have never found anything to take its place. From my perspective it’s the thing that helps me to make sense of this life and to believe that there is something more and better that awaits us. 

 

 

Basilica Community,

I hope this message finds you and your family continuing to stay well during these challenging times. 

As you probably have heard, last night there were protests in downtown Minneapolis – I’m grateful to share that there was no damage on The Basilica campus, but a number of neighboring businesses on Harmon and Nicollet did have damage. Please pray for a calm and peace in our city.

Today I would like to spend a few minutes talking with you about our programs, services, and ministries at The Basilica. As you know at the present time almost everything we are doing, with the exception of the celebration of the sacraments, virtually.

While this has the advantage of keeping everyone safe and secure, the disadvantage is not having personal contact. I suspect we all miss that. I know I do. Going forward we still anticipate that for the foreseeable future, most of our activities will continue to be done virtually.

However, given our success in regard to opening The Basilica for daily and Sunday Masses, it makes sense that we explore whether or not we can resume other activities on our campus. In this regard, we have begun to consider resuming some activities on our campus on a case by case basis. Our standard will be ensuring the safety, security, and well being of the participants or attendees.

Now as I said, most of our activities will continue to be done virtually, but we do need to be responsive to people’s needs and open to their ideas. We will do this on a case by case basis. And given the recent spike in the cases of Coronavirus in Minnesota, we will need to continue to be cautious in resuming any activities on The Basilica campus.

When there are activities on our campus, we will use the same protocols that we currently use to check people in for the celebration of daily and Sunday Mass, and weddings and funerals. We will also ask for a list of attendees and their contact information ahead of time, in the unlikely event that we need to do contact tracing.

As I mentioned last week, one of the ministries we have resumed is the celebration of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. Confessions will be heard in the chapel from 9:00-10:00am on Saturdays. Our protocol for this is posted on our website under the sacraments tab, or you can call the liturgy office for information.

As always, if you would like further information about our protocols or if you have questions or concerns, please contact me at the parish office or send me an email. My contact information is available on our parish website.

Finally, as I have mentioned previously in the event that there is an outbreak of COVID-19 traceable to The Basilica, we will need to reconsider the decision to open The Basilica for public worship. Also if there is a surge in cases of the coronavirus, we will follow any directives/restrictions from the city of Minneapolis or the state. I will alert you as soon as possible, should either of these things occur.

Thank you for your continued prayers and support. Please know they are appreciated more than you know. 

 

Most merciful God,
We come to you in our weakness.
We come to you in our fear.
We come to you with trust.
For you alone are our hope.

Bring wisdom to doctors.
Give understanding to scientists.
Endow caregivers with compassion and generosity.
Bring healing to those who are ill.
Protect those who are most at risk.
Give comfort to those who have lost a loved one.
Welcome those who have died into your eternal home.

Stabilize our communities.
Unite us in our compassion.
Remove all fear from our hearts.
Fill us with confidence in your care.

We ask this in the name of Jesus your son.
Amen.

Upcoming Events

Prayer for Solace and Peace Recorded Live
Sunday, September 6, 5:30pm

Zoom: Beyond the Political Din
Saturdays, September 19 & October 10, 9:00-10:30am
Tuesday, September 29, 6:30-8:00pm

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