Johan's Blog

In our weekly video series "Art That Surrounds Us," Johan van Parys, Ph.D., our Director of Liturgy and Sacred Arts, shares information about a piece from The Basilica of Saint Mary's art collection. This week's installment features The Hospitality of Saint Julien, which hangs in our Saint Teresa of Calcutta Hall.

 

 

 

In our weekly video series "Art That Surrounds Us," Johan van Parys, Ph.D., our Director of Liturgy and Sacred Arts, shares information about a piece from The Basilica of Saint Mary's art collection. This week's installment features our icon of, commissioned by pastor Fr. John M. Bauer and made by Stillwater iconographer Deb Korluka.

 

 

 

 

Mary Untier of Knots

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learn more: BASILICA magazine Spring 2019

Mary, Untier of Knots 

New icon commissioned for the 150th anniversary 

Art That Surrounds Us: Johan van Parys, Ph.D., our Director of Liturgy and Sacred Arts, shares information about a piece from The Basilica of Saint Mary's art collection. This week's installment features our icon of Saint Dymphna, commissioned by our Mental Health Ministry and made by Stillwater iconographer Deb Korluka.

 

 

Saint Dymphna Icon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

bells from roof

Ring Out for Justice

Ring Out for Justice:  Bells across Minnesota will ring out for 10 minutes on Juneteenth, Friday, June 19th, at 6pm in honor of George Floyd and in support of a society of justice and peace.

In partnership with City of Bells.

Join us in prayer,

God of Mercy and Love, 
we implore you,
incite a revolution of love and tenderness,
further a culture of inclusion and encounter,
and shape a society of justice and peace.

God of Wisdom and Understanding,
we beseech you,
inspire wisdom and courage in all religious leaders, 
foster honesty and compassion in all elected officials,
and bolster righteousness and virtue in all those who serve and protect us,

God of Justice and Peace,
we supplicate you,
hasten an end to the evil and sin of racism that permeates our society and our institutions,
inspire laws and regulations that assure justice and equality for all,
and convert the heart of all those who perpetuate fear, promote supremacy and cultivate hatred. 

We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

 

Johan van Parys, Ph.D., Director of Liturgy and the Sacred Arts, introduces the newest Basilica icon, Saint Josephine Bakhita.

 

 

Saint Josephine Bakhita Icon

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For two months now, the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted our lives greatly. As a result many of us have experienced some level of fear, stress, anxiety and grief. Given the uncertainty of every day, week and beyond this is to be expected.

As a church community we are called to support one another in times such as these. And though we may not be able to console and support one another in person, we know that we are not alone because we are all part of the one Body of Christ. We are in this together, for when one part of the Body suffers, the entire Body suffers in solidarity. So we help where and when we can and we are committed to fervent prayer.

Starting on the first Sunday in June and every first Sunday thereafter we will livestream Evening Prayer from The Basilica as long as the Pandemic lasts. This Evening Prayer for Solace and Peace will be offered for all those who are affected in any way by COVID-19. You may have lost your job. You may have been diagnosed with the virus. You may be at greater risk because you are a first responder or healthcare worker , or you work in the cleaning service, as a postal worker or a bank clerk. Maybe you are alone and unable to receive loved ones. There are so many known and unknown ways we are affected by this pandemic. So it is good for us to pause and pray.

At the end of our Evening Prayer for Solace and Peace we will light candles in one of our Marian shrines. We invite you to send your intentions at mary.org/candles. We will offer those to our loving God while lighting the candles.

We especially invite those who have experienced the loss of a family member or a friend during this pandemic to join us. Grief over the death of a loved one is always profound, but this has been compounded during the pandemic. You may not have been able to be with your loved one while they passed away. You may have had to limit attendance at the funeral to a small group of people. Or you may have postponed the service to a future date. All of this is very difficult.

Please submit the names of family and friends who have died during this pandemic to mary.org/prayerrequests. As part of the service, their names will be spoken during the litany of All Saints and All Souls. We hope this service will offer some support to all those who are grieving. And it will offer all of us the opportunity to support our grieving sisters and brothers.

May we all know the healing and consolation of the resurrected Christ.

 

Rediscovering Church

Did you attend church? How was church today? Can you believe how long church lasted? These are questions you have undoubtedly heard many times before. You probably have asked them yourself. They are all valid questions, except maybe for the last one about the length of Mass.

The current pandemic may have occasioned some new questions. Aren’t you sad we are unable to have church? Don’t you love livestreamed church? Won’t it be fantastic when we can have church again? 

What all these questions have in common is that church is equated with a church service in a church building. And though church services and church buildings are a very important part of our church life, there is so much more to being church than that. The current pandemic offers us the unsolicited but hopefully renewing opportunity to think more deeply about what it means to be church.

For now, the active participation in the liturgy that is so important to all of us has been largely taken away from us. This inability to worship in our churches is compelling us to actively participate in the church beyond the liturgy and outside our church buildings. We are (re)-discovering that church is not just a building we go to and a liturgy we participate in but rather church is a way of interacting with one another and our world. In a profound sense we are no longer consumers of church rather we are (re)-discovering what it means to be creators of church.

The Catechism of the Catholic Church posits that the Church is the People of God, the Body of Christ and the Temple of the Holy Spirit. All three understandings of Church root us in our relationship with our Triune God who is our creator, our savior and who inspires us. Though of course we are initiated into the church during worship and worship nourishes and heals us during our earthly journey, this three-fold understanding of church is very much outward oriented. We, as the church are meant to “seek the well-being of the City to which we have been sent, for in its well-being we will find our own.” (Our Vision Statement after the Prophet Jeremiah)

Gaudium et Spes, the 1965 Constitution on the Church in the Modern World makes it abundantly clear that the church exists in and for the world. It states that “it is the duty of the whole People of God, following the word and example of the bishops, to alleviate as far as they are able the sufferings of the modern age.” This mission has a great urgency today. Though we may not be able to gather in church for church, our calling to be church is more important than ever.

Today, on the Solemnity of Pentecost we celebrate the gift of the Holy Spirit and the birth of our church. Let’s implore the Holy Spirit to inspire us to find ever new ways to realize our mission of creation, salvation and inspiration in this ever changing and ever more complex world. 

Come Holy Spirit!

 

“Do not let your hearts be troubled.”

Today, we receive these comforting words from John’s Gospel in the serene setting of the liturgy. And we mostly overlook the fact that they were first spoken in the highly emotional context of the Last Supper.

Jesus gathered with his followers to celebrate a Passover meal as would have been the custom of all Jews. Things took a surprising turn when Jesus began to wash his followers’ feet.  This was most unusual as the washing of feet was commonly done by servants. It was so puzzling to his disciples that Peter at first refused to have his feet washed by Jesus, though in the end he submitted. By washing his followers’ feet Jesus demonstrated how radical and world altering his teaching was and continues to be. He also commanded his disciples to do as he had done: to wash one another’s feet and love one another.

Then Jesus revealed that Judas would betray him and that Peter would deny him. In addition, Jesus disclosed that his time with them was coming to and end. All of this must have been extremely unsettling for the disciples who anticipated a conventional Passover meal but rather experienced the Last Supper with all its human and divine drama in anticipation of Jesus’ passion and death.

At the height of this drama Jesus says: “do not let your hearts be troubled.” I can only speculate at how the disciples received this statement.

Since that night, we the followers of Jesus have found ourselves in troubling times marked by plagues, wars, revolutions, persecutions, etc. And like Jesus told his followers 2000 years ago he has told his followers through the ages even until today: “do not let your hearts be troubled.”

In addition to speaking these comforting words Jesus also reveals in today’s Gospel how we are to act so our hearts will not be troubled even in these most troubling of times by offering himself as “the truth, the way and the life.” Following in the way of Jesus by living and preaching his truth is what will give us life. This fundamental truth and the true way of Jesus is love and service which he demonstrated during the Last Supper by washing feet and commanding us to do the same.

Our times are very troublesome and uncertain. So many people have been affected by COVID 19 in so many different ways. We have no idea when this pandemic will end or what the ultimate impact will be on our society and our personal lives. Like the disciples during the Last Supper we are confused and don’t quite know what to think or how to feel.

As he told his disciples some 2000 year ago, today Jesus tells us not to let our heart be troubled because he is “the truth, the way and the life.” While comforting us he invites us to live and act as he did by loving one another as he has loved us. 

 

 

Extraordinary Times call for Extraordinary Measures

Many years ago I attended a conference which gathered liturgists, architects, and artists from around the world to anticipate worship in a digital age. We talked about virtual churches, virtual art, and even virtual liturgies. Though intrigued, I must admit that I was shocked by the ease with which so many participants anticipated the time when we would all worship “together” from the comfort of our home thanks to the miracle of the internet. What would that be like, people marveled. When I half-jokingly asked if we would have to come up with a theology for “virtual” real presence during on-line adoration, people gave me a blank stare. My suggestion that “burning” a virtual candle was even worse than dropping a coin in an electric candle stand was equally ignored. I did not really care because I did not believe that we would ever get there. And yet, here we are!

A week ago we started limiting physical access to our liturgies while making them only accessible electronically. I was forced to overcome the instinctive dislike I had of virtual liturgy so many years ago when the digital age was still in its infancy. However, extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures.

Catholic liturgy is by its very definition never virtual and digital but always real and physical. It has to be engaged in with as many human senses as possible and cannot be limited to a visual and /or acoustical experience. Also, Catholic liturgy is not received passively but needs to be engaged in actively. And, we need to be able to receive not only the form or words used for the sacraments; we also need to be able to receive the matter of the sacraments such as the Body and Blood of Christ during the Eucharist. However, extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures.

Being asked to stay away from one another in a time of crisis is so counter-intuitive for us Catholics. We want to be together, join our voices in song, walk around in processions, hug, kiss, and above all receive Holy Communion. And though we so desperately long to be together in these uncertain times, we also know that being together could make us--and worse--could make others very sick. When we need one another the most, we are deprived of one another's presence. However, extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures.

This, of course is not the first time the Church has experienced times when the faithful were not able to gather. We have been deprived from communal worship during times of religious persecution, war, and previous pandemics. Unlike in earlier times, today we have an alternative way to be together as we join in virtual worship. 

As we gather virtually for liturgy let us remember three things: first, we are the Body of Christ, united in a much deeper and more profound way than one that requires physical closeness. When a priest celebrates the Mass with only one or a few of us physically present the entire Body of Christ still celebrates the liturgy. Though we are not with him and one another physically, we are still together, spiritually bound by the mystery of the cross. Therefore, we will continue to live-stream as many of our liturgies as we can and invite you to join us. Our goal is to continue to create spiritual communion as the Body of Christ. You can announce your presence in the comments so we have a better sense of community, beyond mere numbers. 
Second, though physical Communion is the absolute preference and necessary whenever possible, there are times when we need to resort to Spiritual Communion. This type of Communion is wholly dependent upon our true desire for physical Communion of which we are deprived.  The 18th century  Saint Alphonsus Liguori wrote this beautiful prayer:   

My Jesus, I believe that you are present in the most Blessed Sacrament. I love You above all things and I desire to receive You into my soul. Since I cannot now receive You sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace You as if You were already there, and unite myself wholly to You. Never permit me to be separated from You. Amen.

As we participate in a virtual celebration of the Eucharist, let’s pray this prayer of Spiritual Communion as we long for the day when we will again be able to receive Holy Communion.

Third, now is the time to go way back in our history and to rekindle the domestic church and to re-invigorate our own religious imagination. Since we can no longer simply rely on the church to fulfill our religious needs we can work on that ourselves. Find your Bible, your religious images and your candles, and create a small prayer space. Many of us have lost the custom and comfort of praying together. 

If there are several people in your household why not enjoy meals together during this home-stay and begin these meals with a simple prayer? Holy Week with its heightened religious sensitivities is also a good time to find ways in which to mark this most important week at home. We will send you some tips to help you bring the celebration of Holy Week into your homes.

When I attended above mentioned conference on virtual worship I truly never thought we would be doing this all over the world. Admittedly, it is not the preferred way; however, extraordinary times call for extraordinary measures. And I hope that as soon as this is all behind us we will rush back to church with joyful anticipation of the celebration of the liturgy. There we will again dip our fingers in baptismal fonts, join our voices in song, walk around in processions, hug, kiss, and above all receive Holy Communion. 

Until then, let us pray with great fervor for an end to this pandemic; for the recovery of those who are ill with this corona virus; and for the eternal joy of those who have died.

Photo Interior Liturgy Easter Cross

The Paschal Mystery

The Sacred Triduum (Holy Thursday – Good Friday – Holy Saturday – Easter Sunday) is my most cherished time of the entire liturgical year. This was instilled in me from a young age as the celebration of the Sacred Triduum was an essential part of my family’s religious experience. 

I fondly remember being one of the twelve who had their feet washed on Holy Thursday, the year I was confirmed. Even then I had a real sense that this small gesture embodies the essence of what it means to be a Christian. And being a lover of processions, how could I ever forget the solemn procession with the Blessed Sacrament. 

At 3:00pm on Good Friday my grandmother gathered our family and everyone who worked in her shoe factory for prayer. I don’t remember what she said but I remember the gravity of the moment. At night, we walked the Stations of the Cross which were set up throughout the city. I will never forget the silent and solemn cadence of the movement and the music. 

Holy Saturday, known to us as Silent Saturday, was a very quiet day. We spoke in hushed voices and tried not to disturb anyone from their prayerful ponderings and hopeful anticipation. At night, we all participated in the great Easter Vigil. Though our Easter Fire at The Basilica is much more impressive than the one we had at home, I still remember standing around it and experiencing the light shining in the darkness. From the very first time I heard the Exsultet sung I wished that one day I would sing it myself.  

Easter Sunday was a most holy day which we spent in church around the table of the Lord and then around the banquet table in my grandmother’s home.

Though I realize things are very different today, all these memories will come flashing back when we celebrate this year’s Triduum.

Below are some suggestions for a fruitful celebration of the Paschal Mystery today.

  1. If at all possible take the Triduum off from work and make it a short retreat. 
  2. Carve out time for personal prayer. 
  3. Try to participate in all our Triduum liturgies.  You can find a list in the Newsletter and online.
  4. When participating in the liturgies do so with full heart, mind, and soul.
  5. Bring your family to the liturgies. We engage in so many beautiful symbolic actions which speak to the liturgical imagination even of the youngest.
  6. If you are not able to be present, please join us in prayer. 
  7. Be sure to pray for those who will be joining the Catholic Church during the Easter Vigil. They are our Easter gift to the Church.

The beautiful liturgies of Holy Week are prepared with great care. Our staff and so many volunteers worked very hard to assure that everyone has a profound experience of the Mystery of our Salvation. Please join us so you may be refreshed and renewed in your faith.  

Blessed Holy Week!

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