News

Starting the first week of August, N 17th Street will permanently become a one-way street directed North from the traffic circle around the corner to Laurel W Ave directed East. You will no longer be able to enter Laurel Ave W from the East.

The Basilica’s safety and facilities teams have been working with the City of Minneapolis and MNDOT for approval to make N 17th Street a one-way street permanently. Restricting the traffic to one direction will improve safety and traffic flow on our campus. 

The street has been temporarily directed as one-way for Christmas and Easter for the past several years and provides a great improvement for the people and cars on the road. It is especially beneficial in the winter months when snow and ice limit the road space. 

The new signs will be posted in late July and the Minneapolis Police Department will be helping us to implement and monitor the new traffic flow on Sundays.

Please help us improve safety and traffic flow on our campus and adhere to the new one-way direction. Our parishioners who are familiar with the campus will help provide a great example for those visiting The Basilica. Thank you for your cooperation! 

 

One-way N 17th St

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tickets still available for the Basilica Block Party. 

Friday, July 6 and Saturday, July 7

Band line up and volunteer information at basilicablockparty.org.

Join us for a great weekend of fun and music benefiting the restoration efforts of The Basilica Landmark and St. Vincent de Paul Ministry. 

Due to the Basilica Block Party, on Friday, July 6, Mass is celebrate at 7:00am in the chapel. There is no Noon Mass.

On Saturday, the 9:00am Confession is canceled. There will be no 5:00pm Mass celebrated.  

Sunday Masses are as regularly scheduled.

School Supply Drive

School Supply Drive

School Supply Drive to benefit Ascension Catholic School 

Donations can be dropped off at weekend masses through Sunday, July 1 through August 5. Help fill backpacks at the Basilica Day celebration on Sunday, August 12.

Collection receptacles will be availabale at the rear of the church and east entrance. 

Supplies needed: 

  • Backpacks
  • 24 Pack Crayons
  • 12 Count Colored Pencils
  • Glue Sticks
  • Highlighters
  • Large Erasers
  • Washable Markers
  • Fiskars School Scissors
  • Pencil Boxes
  • #2 Pencils
  • Spiral Notebooks
  • Sturdy Pocket Folders
     
Ascension Back Pack Donations
Photo provided by: 
Mae Desaire

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ascension Back Pack Donations 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Guidance for a faithful life  

 

As we seek to live our life faithfully, how do we maneuver through the landmines of ethical and moral decisions of our day? In a given situation, the decisions we make and the actions we take can be driven by a complex array of experience, hopes and fears. What tools do we use to ensure we are living faithfully? 

As Catholic Christians, most people are familiar with the Ten Commandments and the Beatitudes. There is another lesser known treasury of principles that speak to our lives today. Sometimes called the best kept secret of our faith, Catholic Social Teaching proposes principles for reflection, provides criteria for judgment and offers guidelines for action.

Catholic Social Teaching is a way of reflecting on the world today. It is not a fixed block of doctrine or ideology, but the result of prayerful reflection on the complex realities of human existence. Animated by the Gospel, it provides core principles that can address the demands of the time. 

 

This article and more in the spring BASILICA Magazine.

Download full article Catholic Social Teaching

by Janice Andersen

 

The award-winning BASILICA magazine is sponsored by The Basilica Landmark, a 501(c)(3) organization with a mission to preserve, restore, and advance the historic Basilica of Saint Mary for all generations. 

BASILICA is published twice a year (spring and fall) with a circulation of 20,000. 

For advertising information please contact Peggy Jennings.

"At its core, asylum is an instrument to preserve the right to life. The Attorney General's recent decision elicits deep concern because it potentially strips asylum from many women who lack adequate protection. These vulnerable women will now face return to the extreme dangers of domestic violence in their home country. This decision negates decades of precedents that have provided protection to women fleeing domestic violence. Unless overturned, the decision will erode the capacity of asylum to save lives, particularly in cases that involve asylum seekers who are persecuted by private actors. We urge courts and policy makers to respect and enhance, not erode, the potential of our asylum system to preserve and protect the right to life.

Additionally, I join Bishop Joe Vásquez, Chairman of USCCB's Committee on Migration, in condemning the continued use of family separation at the U.S./Mexico border as an implementation of the Administration's zero tolerance policy. Our government has the discretion in our laws to ensure that young children are not separated from their parents and exposed to irreparable harm and trauma. Families are the foundational element of our society and they must be able to stay together. While protecting our borders is important, we can and must do better as a government, and as a society, to find other ways to ensure that safety. Separating babies from their mothers is not the answer and is immoral."

 

http://www.usccb.org/news/2018/18-098.cfm

 

Where Does Altar Bread Come From?  

The Eucharist is a cornerstone of living out the Catholic faith. Every time a Catholic goes to Mass, he or she has the opportunity to encounter Christ in the Eucharist and contemplate the mystery of faith. For such a fundamental part of our shared spiritual tradition, we may have never stopped to wonder where the bread that becomes the Body of Christ is made.

Until recently, The Basilica of Saint Mary received its altar bread from the Contemplative Sisters of the Good Shepherd, an order of nuns in Saint Paul. The Sisters recently discerned that they will discontinue their altar bread ministry because of the advanced age of their sisters. The Basilica received their last shipment of 30,000 hosts from the Sisters in early January and will now look for a new source.

Altar bread is different than bread or crackers at the grocery store. It must be made with wheat and water and without any additives, said Johan van Parys, Director of Liturgy and Sacred Arts at The Basilica. Though it’s not required, hosts are typically made by religious communities like the Sisters of the Good Shepherd.

This article and more in the spring BASILICA Magazine.

Download full article Baking the Bread to Become the Body

by Rachel Newman

 

The award-winning BASILICA magazine is sponsored by The Basilica Landmark, a 501(c)(3) organization with a mission to preserve, restore, and advance the historic Basilica of Saint Mary for all generations. 

BASILICA is published twice a year (spring and fall) with a circulation of 20,000. 

For advertising information please contact Peggy Jennings.

Dear Parishioners:  

Last week we all heard the good news that an agreement had been reached to resolve the bankruptcy of the Archdiocese.  As you know, the agreement establishes a trust fund of approximately $210 million for the victims/survivors. Some of the money for the settlement fund came in the form of voluntary pledges of financial support from parishes and priests of our Archdiocese.  I believe this is a wonderful statement of our compassion and support for our brothers and sisters who were seriously wounded and hurt by my brother priests and by others in our church.  

With this letter I would like to inform you that The Basilica of Saint Mary was one of the parishes that made a confidential pledge of financial support to the settlement fund.  This decision was made in consultation with our Parish Council and Finance committee.  After setting a range for this contribution they directed that our Parish Trustees and I make the final decision as to the amount of the contribution. The money for this pledge came from our parish reserves, which are funded by the rental income from our school building. Our financial pledge won’t be payable until the details of the settlement are finalized.  It is our hope that making this pledge of financial support will send a strong message of solidarity and support to the victims/survivors.  

While the settlement will resolve the Archdiocesan bankruptcy we need to continue to follow up with prayer and outreach to the victims/survivors.  This needs to be and must be an ongoing effort.   I hope you will join in prayer for those who have been so grievously wounded by members of our Church.  

It is my firm and abiding belief that God’s Spirit continues to lead and guide our Church and our parish.   If we are open to the gentle guidance of the Spirit, I believe it will lead us into a future full of hope.  

If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me.   

Sincerely yours in Christ, 

 

John M. Bauer 
Pastor, The Basilica of Saint Mary 

May 31, 2018
 
Dear Brothers and Sisters in Christ, 
 
By now, I hope you have heard the good news that an agreement has been reached to resolve the bankruptcy of the Archdiocese. Thank you for your prayers.
 
The consensual agreement, reached after much hard work, establishes a trust fund totaling approximately $210 million that will be available for the resolution of the bankruptcy claims. It also includes a provision that will enable the parishes of the Archdiocese and related Catholic institutions to avoid further litigation stemming from these claims, thereby enabling us to carry on our mission of spreading and living the Gospel of Jesus Christ.  
  
I am particularly grateful to the victims/survivors who have bravely come forward.  Without their courage and persistence, this resolution would not have been possible. The Church let them down, and we are humbled that they now allow us to begin to make amends. We will all need to do more to let them know that they are always truly welcome in our parishes. 
 
I am also grateful to Judge Robert Kressel for the direction he provided, which led to this settlement, and to Magistrate Arthur Boylan and Paul Van Osselaer for their extraordinary efforts as our mediators. They were true, honest brokers in working with all parties.  
 
Gratitude is owed as well to the many advocates who worked so passionately on behalf of survivors. They, along with the legal counsel representing the parishes, played a vital role in helping us all find a path to a just and fair resolution. 
 
I am especially grateful to our legal team from Briggs and Morgan, who worked tirelessly to analyze, address and advance this matter for over three years, while respecting our Gospel values and objectives. Also, I would be remiss if I failed to thank Tom Abood, the chair of the Archdiocesan Finance Council, who, as chair of our Reorganization Task Force led the negotiations on behalf of the Archdiocese. The advice given by the Finance Council, our Corporate Board, and the College of Consultors proved to be of inestimable value and once again highlighted the importance of consultation. 
 
I realize that many others deserve gratitude, especially those of you who have been so faithful throughout these most difficult of times, relying on our Lord in the Eucharist and on your families, friends, and clergy for strength during these challenging months. I am grateful that you enabled our parishes to continue to be vibrant centers where all can encounter Christ. Please continue to reach out in love and generosity to those around you who are hurting and are in need of healing.   
 
Even as we take this important step forward in providing justice to survivors of abuse, we know our work in this regard is not complete. Our Ministerial Standards and Safe Environment team – under the direction of Judge Tim O’Malley – will continue its work on demonstrable actions to ensure our churches, schools and communities are safe places for all. Our December 2015 Settlement Agreement with the Ramsey County Attorney’s Office, establishing what County Attorney John Choi called “unprecedented” child safety policies, continues to be the national standard for maintaining safe environments.  Our progress reports to the court since that time give continued evidence of our commitment to permanent change. The bankruptcy settlement gives us yet another opportunity to reaffirm our efforts to protect children and vulnerable adults. 
 
While this agreement marks the end of a difficult period for many, it also signals a new beginning. The completion of the bankruptcy process allows us to pursue a new day that has many realities – atonement, healing and restoration of trust.
    
In closing, I ask that you continue to pray for those who have been harmed, for your pastors and all the priests who faithfully serve this Archdiocese, and for the faithful men and women who strengthen this local Church by their perseverance, their example, and their generous service. 
 
With every personal best wish and prayer, I remain     
        
Sincerely in Christ,
 
Most Reverend Bernard A. Hebda
Archbishop of Saint Paul and Minneapolis

 

 

 

 

 

Vote Today! 

Please take time to vote, The Parish Council represents you - our parishioners. The Council plays a key role in working with the pastor to ensure The Basilica of Saint Mary community continues to live out our mission and vision.
 
mary.org/vote.
 
Thank you in advance for your participation and your continued support of The Basilica.

Please remember, all ballots must be received by 5:00pm Monday, June 4, 2018.

 

Sanctuary Supporting Congregation 

One of the values we strive to live every day at the Basilica is compassion.  As such we become aware of our shared brokenness, and we deeply respect all of God's people, and gratefully welcome-as we would Christ-all those who come to our door.  We embrace these people as our brothers and sister in Christ, and we share with them hospitality, love, acceptance and care.  We are a community serving the needs of our neighbors. Every day we provide basic tangible and physical resources such as sandwiches, clothing, toiletries, shoes, bus cards, help with I.D. cards and assistance with transportation.

For almost a year, our parish leadership has been learning about and discussing the possibility of The Basilica becoming a Sanctuary Supporting Congregation.  At the April meeting of our Parish Council, the decision was made to become a Sanctuary Supporting Congregation.  In making this commitment we will continue to do what we currently do for those who come to our St. Vincent de Paul Ministry, many of them from Ascension, our sister parish in North Minneapolis.  We would also continue our advocacy work and our prayerful support particularly for those who are on the margins and in need.  The major difference would be that we would be named as part of a network of congregations that are committed to supporting this work.  

It is perhaps most important to note, though, that becoming a Sanctuary Supporting Congregation is very different form being a Sanctuary Congregation.  Being a Sanctuary Congregation requires additional commitments that could put the Basilica at some legal risk.  As your pastor, I cannot do that.   Being a  Sanctuary Supporting Congregation has significantly fewer commitments and would serve as a way to continue to compassionately serve a community in need and as a way of living our faith. 

Now admittedly in today’s world, the word “Sanctuary” comes with some baggage. It may be helpful to note, though, that it shares the same root as the Latin word: “Sanctus,” which means holy.   Jesus has told us that “whatsoever you do to the least of my brothers, you do for me.”  Additionally, in his trip to Colombia this past September Pope Francis called on Catholics to “promote the dignity of all our brothers and sisters, particularly the poor and the excluded of society, those who are abandoned, immigrants and those who suffer violence and human trafficking,” Responding without judgement to the needs of those who come to our doors is what we are called to do as followers of Jesus Christ.  

I would encourage anyone who has questions or concerns about this issue to take them to prayer.  If, after praying about them, you would like to share them with me, please contact me.
 

Fr. John M. Bauer
Pastor
The Basilica of Saint Mary

 

For more information visit mary.org/sanctuarysupport

 

 

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