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Join the Journey!  Bend your knees, mend your hearts, and lend your hands.”

The Second Week of Lent

“On the Care for our Planet and One Another.”

 

In 2015 Pope Francis addressed his encyclical Laudato Sì. On Care for Our Common Home to “everyone living on this planet.” With this encyclical, Pope Francis calls for a radical and urgent “Ecological Conversion” which he grounds in Scripture and adds to our body of Catholic Social Teaching.

 

Pope Francis wrote that God’s granting “dominion” over the earth in Gen. 1:28 is often used to justify the relentless exploitation of our planet. As a corrective he offers Gen. 2:15 where God entrusts both the cultivation and the care for our planet to us. Too often, he says we have excelled at cultivating the earth but have failed miserably at caring for our planet.

 

Now is the time to change that and to urgently start caring for our planet and for one another.  Poor people and poorer countries bare the brunt of climate change while they are victimized by the unbridled pursuit of money and possessions in richer parts of the world.

 

You can find more information about Laudato Si’ and how we might collaborate on its implementation at: https://laudatosiactionplatform.org/ The Laudato Si’ Action Platform is a unique collaboration between the Vatican, an international coalition of Catholic organizations, and “all men and women of good will.”

 

During this Second Week of Lent let’s mend our hearts by fasting from single-use plastic; bend our knees by praying with Pope Francis; and lend our hands by purchasing sustainably and ethically sourced products.

 

  • Mending our Heart by Fasting from Single-Use Plastic
  • Pope Francis does not mince words when he says: “The earth, our home, is beginning to look more and more like an immense pile of filth.”
  • Though most of us are diligent about composting and recycling far too much plastic still ends up in our ocean. In an TV interview in February Pope Francis said “Throwing plastic into the sea is criminal. It kills biodiversity, it kills the earth, it kills everything.” The best way to prevent this from happening is by eliminating the use of plastic.
  • This week let’s consider fasting from products that come in one-time use plastic containers. For many practical and attainable suggestions please go to: https://ourcommonhome.org/media/docs/Lenten-Plastic-Fast.pdf

https://www.plasticsoupfoundation.org/en/

https://www.ncronline.org/earthbeat

 

  • Bending our Knee by Praying with Pope Francis
  • Pope Francis ends Laudato Sì with prayers which he invites us to pray often. During this second week of Lent let us offer the following prayer on a daily basis.

 

O God of the poor,

help us to rescue the abandoned and forgotten of this earth,

so precious in your eyes.

 

Bring healing to our lives,

that we may protect the world and not prey on it,

that we may sow beauty, not pollution and destruction.

 

Touch the hearts of those who look only for gain

at the expense of the poor and the earth.

 

Teach us to discover the worth of each thing,

to be filled with awe and contemplation,

to recognize that we are profoundly united with every creature

as we journey towards your infinite light.

 

We thank you for being with us each day.

Encourage us, we pray, in our struggle for justice, love and peace

 

  • Lending our Hands by Purchasing Sustainably and Ethically Sourced Products
  • In Laudato Si’ Pope Francis praises St. Francis for lifting up the “inseparable bond between concern for nature, justice for the poor, commitment to society, and interior peace.” Pope Francis then goes so far as to say that we need to respond to “both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor” as both are profoundly connected.
  • This seems like an overwhelming task. Besides we are not decision makers. We are subject to decisions made by others who have much more power and wield much greater influence than we do. Yet maybe the task is not for one person to make big changes but rather for a great number of people to institute small changes.
  • This week maybe we can carefully consider the products we buy. The important question to ask is how these products impact our planet, the lives of others and especially the lives of those making them. In other words, let’s commit ourselves to buying products that were sustainably sourced and ethically produced.

 

And please remember to be patient with yourself and others and don’t let yourself be overwhelmed.  Lent is neither an endurance test nor a time to prove our Christian heroism. Rather, Lent is a time to slow down and ponder what is essential to our faith and thus to our life as Christians. So please pace yourselves. Give yourself and others the necessary space. And above all be patient with yourself and others.

 

Johan M. J. van Parys, Ph.D.

Director of Liturgy and the Sacred Arts

 

 

 

 

Join us this Lenten season 

A message from Fr. John Bauer, Pastor

 

Greetings once again from The Basilica of Saint Mary. I hope this message finds you and your family continuing to stay well during these challenging times. 

As I have mentioned previously, I will be retiring from The Basilica at the end of June, and on July 1 will become pastor of the Church of Our Lady of Lourdes. While I will be very sad to leave The Basilica, I am very excited and very grateful that Fr. Dan Griffith will be following me as Pastor. Dan is a good person, a good priest, and a good pastor. 

He has already met with some of the staff as well as our parish trustees and will continue to meet with staff and attend meetings as he is able in the weeks ahead. The Basilica is blessed that Fr. Griffith will be the next pastor. 

Today I would also like to invite you to join us in person or via livestream for Mass, Stations of the Cross, and Vespers during this season of Lent. Our schedule of services is available on our website. We also invite you to participate in a small faith sharing or bible study group during the season of Lent. You can learn more about these groups on our parish website. 

As I have mentioned before, we have taken several steps to promote the safety and wellbeing of those who will be attending any services or activities at The Basilica. While the city of Minneapolis has discontinued its facemask requirement, we still encourage those who will be coming to The Basilica to wear a face mask. We will do this until the CDC changes its guidelines. Wearing a mask is a concrete way to show your care and concern for your fellow Christians. 

Today I also want to thank those of you who continue to support The Basilica financially. Please know your financial support is greatly appreciated. Your financial support makes it possible for to continue to offer the many ministries, services and programs that are at the heart of our Basilica community. Certainly, the last couple of years have been very difficult for all of us. Yet, despite the difficulties and the stress, there have also been moments of great grace, as God’s love has broken through and blessed us. 

Joining us during the season of Lent and Easter is a wonderful way for us to gather as a people of faith to celebrate and thank God for the many ways God has blessed us in our lives. And, as always, if you are not able, or don’t feel comfortable joining us in-person for any of our liturgies, we invite you join them via livestream. A schedule of our livestreamed liturgies is available on our website.

Finally, I want to let you know of my ongoing prayers for our community. The Basilica is indeed a very special place—made so by our parishioners and staff. 

As always, I would like to close today with a prayer. 

 

Dear God – 
You have made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your Son: 
Look with compassion on the whole human family; 
take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; 
break down the walls that separate us; 
unite us in bonds of love; 
and work through our struggles and confusion to accomplish your purposes; 
so that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; 
we ask this through Jesus Christ our Lord. 
Amen.

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Many of the faithful would like to contribute to help our sisters and brothers in Ukraine. Because the situation is so fluid and to maximize the efficiency of the gift, the Archdiocese recommends that the faithful contribute through Catholic Relief Services. Please use this link to CRS for donations and feel free to share the CRS Emergency Factsheet about the relief efforts underway.

 

CRS Ukraine Fact Sheet

https://www.crs.org/media-center/current-issues/ukraine-conflict-facts-and-how-help

 

 

The First Week of Lent:

Join the Journey!  Bend your knees, mend your heart, and lend your hands.”

Be quick to hear, slow to speak, slow to angerJames 1: 19

 

In his weekly Wednesday Audience of December 15, 2021, Pope Francis spoke about the urgent need for deep silence, which is much more than the mere absence of sound. He quoted the French Philosopher Blaise Pascal who observed that “all the unhappiness of people arises from one single fact, that they cannot stay quietly in their own chamber.”

 

The cultivation of silence is indeed essential for true human happiness because it is in silence that we learn the important skill of listening. It is in silence that we learn how to listen to our own deepest truths and yearnings; to one another’s thoughts and needs; and even for God’s voice. In the same audience, Pope Francis referenced the Book of Wisdom underlining that it was “While gentle silence enveloped all things, your [God’s] all-powerful word leaped from heaven.” 

 

The gift of silence and the virtue of listening go hand in hand, yet sadly both are lost on most of us. We have become uncomfortable with silence, and we have lost the art of listening.

 

During this First Week of Lent, we invite you to: mend your heart by fasting from noise and needless speech; bend you knees while engaging in Centering Prayer; and lend your hands by listening intently to others.

 

  • Mending our Hearts: Fasting from Noise and Needless Speech
    • Our world is filled with constant noise. As individuals and as a society we have become estranged from silence. Worse, it seems we have become fearful of silence as we constantly surround ourselves with sound.
    • At the same time, the art of listening has been lost. And the voice that seemingly matters most is not the voice of the one who knows most deeply but rather from the one who speaks most loudly.
    • So, during Lent let’s fast from all the noise that surrounds us and let us give up all needless speech.

 

 

  • Lending our Hands: Listening Intently to Others
  • Not only have we lost a sense of the importance silence we also have lost the willingness to listen. We have made up our mind on so many things and our willingness to listen to others is limited to those who think like we do. This is the perfect way to keep polarizing and dividing our community and our church.
  • We need to reclaim and relearn the art of listening. Only if we listen intently and open ourselves to what others have to say can we properly communicate and interact with one another, which is the basis of civil society.
  • Let’s open ourselves this week to the art of listening, deep listening to our own deepest yearnings, intent listening to the needs of others, and intentional listening for the voice of God.

 

And please remember to be patient with yourself and others and don’t let yourself be overwhelmed.  Lent is neither an endurance test nor a time to prove our Christian heroism. Rather, Lent is a time to slow down and ponder what is essential to our faith and thus to our life as Christians. So please pace yourselves. Give yourself and others the necessary space. And above all be patient with yourself and others.

 

 

Join the Journey!  Bend your knees, mend your hearts, and lend your hands.”

The word "Lent" comes from the Anglo-Saxon word 'lencten' which is rooted in the Germanic word for lengthening. It was used to reference the season of Spring because it is the time when the days indeed become longer.

During Lent the days indeed become longer and more light is gained every day. By the time Easter comes around we will have 13 hours and 36 minutes of daylight. That is almost 5 hours more daylight than when we celebrated Christmas.

And as we gain more daylight it is our hope that we gain more spiritual light as well through the traditional Lenten disciplines of praying, fasting and almsgiving.

In a Lenten sermon preached a few years ago by Fr. Jerry Kurian, this Syriac Orthodox priest suggested a new approach to these traditional disciplines as he asks us to take the time during Lent to “bend our knees, mend our hearts, and lend our hands.” And he warns us that our Lenten practices are for naught if they do not change who we are and how we act.

Every week of Lent we will send out a simple communication with some suggestions for a fruitful observation of Lent looking at how we might bend our knees, mend our hearts, and lend our hands. But before we begin Lent we have some suggestions to ready ourselves.

 

Getting Ready for the Journey

In preparation of our Lenten Journey we suggest that you consider doing the following:

  • Create Time for the Journey:

Sometimes we may wonder if we are still in charge of our own lives. Our calendars are filled with appointments and deadlines. In addition, there is the unrelenting barrage of e-mails and texts, while Facebook, Twitter, TikTok and other social media are vying for our time. The blessing of electronic communications has also become a challenge as the lines between worktime, time with family and friend, time to play and time to pray have been blurred.

Lent invites us to set boundaries and re-claim control over our own time and thus over our own life. So, before Lent begins, decide on how you might best create time for your Lenten Journey.

 

  • Prepare a Space for the Journey:

We are keen to assign certain activities to certain rooms and we associate specific rooms with specific activities: we cook in the kitchen; we eat in the dining room; we relax in the living room; we sleep in the bedroom; etc. Each room connotes a specific activity.

When it comes to the primary space we use for prayer, The Basilica undoubtedly comes to mind. Yet, as we try to create more time for prayer and meditation during Lent it is good to set aside a space in our homes that is dedicated to prayer and that is accessible at any given time.

So, before Lent begins, dedicate a room or a corner in a room to be your prayer space. You might place your favorite cross there, or an image of a beloved saint, your bible and a candle as a focus for your prayer.

 

  • Allow for Enough Spiritual Bandwidth for the Journey:

Silence is difficult to find these days. Even when we are by ourselves, our minds are filled to the brim with so many things, most of which are of little consequence. Some people call it mind-chatter, random thoughts that prevent us from having the bandwidth for profound thoughts.

So, before Lent begins let’s commit ourselves to the work of emptying our mind of the unnecessary chatter so we can create the necessary band-with for meditation and prayer. Turning off the mind-chatter is not an easy thing to do. It will take time and dedication as well as a good deal of intentionality.

 

During the Journey

  • Be Patient with Yourself and Others during the Journey: 

Lent is not an endurance test or a time to prove our Christian stamina. Rather, Lent is a time to slow down and ponder what is essential to our faith and thus to our life as Christians. Therefore, pace yourself. Give yourself and others some space. And above all be forgiving.

 

After the Journey

  • Carry you Lenten Experience with you after the Journey: 

Lent is not a time for spiritual gymnastics which are abandoned as soon as the Easter Bells toll. Lent is a time of heightened “rehearsal” in what it means to be a Christian in our world today. So, as we engage in our Lenten practices let us be sure that they “change who we are and how we act.”

May this Lenten season of 2022 be a blessing to all of us.

 

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