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Seven Fates: Racial Healing Stations

Sunday, May 22, 2022 - 1:00pm

Seven Fates: Racial Healing Stations

This evocative and devotional prayer service invites us to meditate on the inequities caused by racism through sacred art from The Basilica’s collection, music performed by Basilica musicians, lived experience of those marginalized in our society, and prayers by Cole Arthur Riley of @Black Liturgies. The service brings together the work of our Equity, Diversity and Inclusion (EDI) Parish-wide initiative and Sarah Bellamy’s Eight Fates of George Floyd, to continue to work to end racism in our society and as we remember the 2nd anniversary of Floyd’s death.

The prayer service will be followed by a discussion in the lower level to share reflections and discuss next steps on both parish and personal levels. Registration is requested.

If you have any questions, please contact Janet

Livestream link or at facebook.com/BasilicaMpls

 

 

 

I feel blessed and honored to be a part of this project. Also, I am excited and proud to be a part of The Basilica community that gets how important it is to address racial healing amongst ourselves. This project is a good step in the right direction and I hope we can help others in the effort. 

Eve Black, EDI Leadership Team

 

Participating in the Racial Healing Stations service has been such a meaningful experience for me, both to be able to use my music towards this important work but also to get to participate in the stations myself. There is something about ritual that helps us to process, and the opportunity to engage fully--body and soul--really helped me to process my pain at the injustice that I am unfortunately complicit in, and to turn it into productive energy for justice.

I am heartened by watching the care and humility with which The Basilica staff and community have lovingly crafted and re-crafted this service, and grateful for the expert advice of EDI consultant Sarah Bellamy to be able make sure that the intent of the service matches its execution. At the end of the day, I am simply grateful to be part of a community that sees this work as important and does something about it.

Amanda Leger-Harewood