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BASILICA Magazine 

As we continue our parish’s year-long sesquicentennial celebration, this issue looks at some people at The Basilica who said “yes” to God’s invitations to service, using varied gifts to form one body in order to do Christ’s work abundantly.

One person provided beautiful bells to our parish, named after “everyday” saints who also answered God’s call. Some assist and guide our parish’s strategic planning and campus space initiatives. Others lend their voices to our Cathedral choir, performing in an interfaith Together in Hope concert. Many more help at Basilica events, including the 25th annual Basilica Block Party, the recent wedding reunion, or the upcoming all school reunion.

Melissa Streit, Editor
 

Thank you to the dedicated volunteer team who created the issue.

BASILICA magazine spring 2019
 

BASILICA magazine spring 2019_lowrez

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside this issue:

Our Parish, Our Future
Focusing on the next five years 
by Bob Kleiber 

The Future of The Basilica
Planning for our space needs 
by Kathy Andrus 

Our Teresa of Calcutta Hall
A place of service, fellowship, and community 
by Melissa Streit 

The Arizona Borderlands
Where humanitarian aid is being criminalized 
by Chris Serres 

Mary, Untier of Knots
New icon commissioned 
by Elyse Rethlake 

Walker Art Center’s New Executive Director
An interview with Mary Ceruti 
by Johan M.J. vanParys, Ph.D. 

The Basilica Wedding Reunion
by Mae Desaire 

The Journey of Our Bells
Our invitation to the city 
by Toni McNaron 

The Basilica’s Caring Ministries
How can we help? 
by Rachel Newman

Together In Hope
The transformative power of music 
by Nick Hansen 

The Basilica Block Party
Twenty-five years of rock on the block 
by Melissa Streit

 

The award-winning BASILICA magazine is sponsored by The Basilica Landmark, a 501(c)(3) organization with a mission to preserve, restore, and advance the historic Basilica of Saint Mary for all generations. 

BASILICA is published twice a year (spring and fall) with a circulation of 20,000. 
For advertising information please contact Liz Legatt.
 

Parishioners, please be aware of a current email scam. Fraud emails are being sent out from a gmail account impersonating Fr. Bauer. Do not open these emails or respond to them. 

More information about this scam can be found in a recent article from the Catholic Spirit.
https://thecatholicspirit.com/featured/online-scam-targets-priests-parishioners/ 

The Basilica Landmark has announced a funding initiative to refurbish the essential community space in the lower level of the church, the Teresa of Calcutta Hall. This primary gathering space in the lower level of the church serves the daily physical, mental, and emotional needs of thousands in the community. From homelessness, employment, and immigration support to interfaith collaborations, training seminars, artist exhibits and beyond—the funds raised will be designated to refurbish the essential community space.

The Basilica Landmark will kick-off this fundraising initiative, know as the Fund-A-Need, at the Landmark Spark—a special evening dedicated to keeping the flame alive for the beloved Basilica. The Landmark Spark event is reimagined this year to amp up the classic event to a night that ignites. 

The Landmark Spark event chair, Karen Capiz, is especially passionate about improving the community space used to support our neighbors in need. Karen volunteers with one of the many outreach programs and believes, “Having a welcoming, clean, comfortable space is important to best serve everyone who comes through The Basilica’s doors.”

The Basilica Landmark Board of Directors invites the community to support our effort to refurbish the essential community space. It is important that the physical building reflect our message of welcome and hospitality to all.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Landmark Spark
Saturday, May 18, 2019
The Machine Shop
300 2nd St SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414

The signature fundraising event features creative cuisine, specialty cocktails, and fantastic giving opportunities to support The Basilica Landmark.

To purchase tickets or make a gift to support the Fund-A-Need initiative visit www.thebasilicalandmark.org.

 

 

 

 

Divine Mercy Sunday vespers will be devoted to the people of Sri Lanka. Please join us in prayer for the victims and for an end to violence. A book will be available for parishioners to share prayers that will be sent to the Cardinal of Sri Lanka.

April 28, 3:00pm 
Basilica Choir Stalls

 

 

The Basilica of Saint Mary welcomes all to celebrate Holy Week and Easter, April 18 through April 21, 2019. The vibrant beauty and tradition at The Basilica will draw over 10,000 people for these sacred celebrations.

The most important days of Holy week, known as the Sacred Triduum, begin with Holy Thursday on April 18, and continue with Good Friday, April 19, Holy Saturday, April 20, and Easter Sunday, April 21.

“The Basilica is honored to welcome parishioners and visitors to celebrate the passion, death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ,” said Dr. Johan van Parys, director of liturgy and sacred arts at The Basilica.

 

Reveiw full schedule www.mary.org/holyweek

 

 

The Basilica of Saint Mary stands in prayer and support with the Notre Dame Cathedral community and the city of Paris. We pray for the safety of the first responders working to manage the fire.

During this Holy week, Catholics around the world are saddened by the destruction of the iconic cathedral. The loss of precious relics, irreplaceable art, striking architecture, rich history and culture, are simply devastating. 

We invite our community to join us in prayer and to share a message to the people of Paris. A book of messages will be placed on the Altar of the Sacred Heart in The Basilica. This book will be sent to the Archbishop of Paris.

Tuesday, April 16 - Noon Mass
Saint Joseph Chapel, Basilica Ground Level 
Mass followed by a rosary to Our Lady of Paris

 

 

Bulletin April/May 2019

From the Pastor

It’s not over yet …

As I write this column, it was recently announced that former Cardinal Theodore McCarrick has been removed from ministry. I suspect that several bishops, along with many members of the Vatican Curia are wiping their brows and muttering: “Whew! Thank God, that’s over.” And yet, the reality is that it isn’t over—not by a long shot. There are things that yet need to be done to bring closure to this very sad and very painful chapter in the history of the Catholic Church in America. Specifically, I think there are four things that need to be done in response to the news about former Cardinal McCarrick. 

1. We need to make public all the files that relate to former Cardinal McCarrick. I say this not because I want to encourage voyeurism or to publicly humiliate former Cardinal McCarrick. Rather, until everything is out in the open, I suspect there will always be the suspicion in the public’s mind that the Church is holding something back. At this point in time, however, our Church cannot appear to be anything less than open, honest and transparent. Even the hint that something is being withheld or being covered up is simply unacceptable. We need to publicly share the various files on former Cardinal McCarrick, so that there can be no doubt that our Church leaders understand and are truly committed to a new era of openness, transparency, and honesty. This is called accountability. People should not only expect it, they should demand it.

Related to the above, as I’ve stated in the past, and for the same reasons as above, I think our Archdiocese needs to release the investigations into the conduct of former Archbishop John Nienstedt. Certainly there are ways of protecting the anonymity of those who, when interviewed, were promised anonymity. The faithful of our Archdiocese need and deserve the truth, so that we can move forward into a future with confidence that our Archdiocese is indeed being open, honest, and transparent. 

2. Those Cardinals, Archbishops, Bishops, and priests who knew of former Cardinal McCarrick’s behavior and didn’t say or do anything about it, need to resign. Since the news about former Cardinal McCarrick first became public, the lingering question has been how he was able to remain at the pinnacle of power in the Catholic Church for more than twenty years despite persistent rumors that something was amiss. People need to know who knew what, when did they know it, and why they failed to act. On October 6, the Vatican issued a statement indicating that Pope Francis had ordered a “thorough review” of Vatican files relating to McCarrick. In part the statement read: “Both abuse and its cover-up can no longer be tolerated and a different treatment for Bishops who have committed or covered up abuse, in fact represents a form of clericalism that is no longer acceptable.” While the Vatican indicated that the results of the review would be communicated “in due course,” so far there has been no update. Until that revelation comes, it is doubtful that anyone will consider the McCarrick story closed.

3. Just as dioceses in the United States have policies and procedures for dealing with priests who have been accused of sexual abuse or other sexually inappropriate behaviors, so now Bishops need to be covered by these same policies and procedures. Furthermore, these policies and procedures need to be world-wide. As I write this column the meeting of the heads of the world’s Bishops’ Conferences in Rome has just ended. Perhaps it will produce such a result. If that doesn’t occur, however, the Bishops of the United States need to put into place the same policies and procedures that are in place for priests, for bishops who have been accused of sexual abuse or other sexually inappropriate behavior, or who covered up this behavior. There is no reason why this can’t be done, and no excuse for not doing it. We need this kind of accountability if our Church and its leaders will ever again be seen as creditable. 

4. In regard to the issue of clergy sexual abuse we must continue to offer our apologies, and look for ways to reach out to those who are victims/survivors of sexual abuse. However, as I mentioned in an earlier column on this issue, we must also acknowledge and admit with sadness and great sorrow that we can never think that our previous and ongoing apologies are enough, or that we can ever make amends. Yes, we need to continue to offer our ongoing profound and deepest apologies. But this is only the beginning. People have been deeply wounded by individuals they trusted. In most cases, those in positions of authority allowed this to happen. We must seek new and ongoing ways to respond to the hurt and pain that happened to people in our church. I don't know what this will look like, but I do know we need to talk about this in a public forum, so victims/survivors can tell us what they need from us. Apologies—even ongoing apologies—are not enough.

Until and unless the leaders of our Church exercise leadership in regard to the issue of sexual abuse, our church will continue to be embroiled in the sexual abuse crisis. Worse, until and unless the leaders of our Church exercise leadership in regard to the issue of sexual abuse, people will continue to leave our Church in frustration and anger. As we struggle to deal with this crisis and move forward, I believe prayer will be an essential weapon in our arsenal. We need to pray for and with each other and most particularly for those who have brought this stain upon our Church. Certainly prayer cannot change what has happened, but it can have a salving effect on wounded souls and eventually it can bring about healing and peace.

 

Rev. John M. Bauer
Pastor, The Basilica of Saint Mary

 

Download full bulletin

Parishioners are invited to nominate excellent candidates to represent the Liturgy and Sacred Art and Learning areas to the Parish Council by April 15.

You may nominate yourself or someone you think would thrive in one of the positions.

Submit Nomination

Please call Terri Ashmore at 612.317.3471 for more information.

 

We are all aware of the hard Minnesota winter we have been experiencing.  With it comes additional expenses to keep our Basilica sidewalks clear and the building warm.  We are currently $7,000 over budget on snow removal and $17,760 over budget on utilities.  If you are able please consider a donation today to help The Basilica with our additional expenses.

Donate Now

 

Exterior Mass Sign Snow 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exterior Snow 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Multi-generational families committed to service 

“FOR everything there is a season,” wrote Qoheleth, whose teachings were recorded in Ecclesiastes long before The Byrds added a catchy refrain in the Sixties. A time to reap, to sow, to laugh, to cry, to dance, to heal, to embrace, and more. There is a time and place to everything under the heaven. Some Basilica families have spent many times and seasons at The Basilica, purposely weaving the parish into their lives multi-generationally.

 

Full article:

https://www.mary.org/sites/default/files/assets/files/3030-3049-carrying-basilica-tradition.pdf 

From the Fall 2018 issue of the BASILICA magazine. 

 

BASILICA Magazine 150 Cover

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

www.mary.org/magazinefall2018

 

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