Fr. John Bauer

Rector and Pastor
Clergy

Serves on the Parish Council, Finance Committee, Stewardship Council and as a member of The Basilica Landmark Board.  Fr. Bauer led the successful merger of 3 parishes (St.Therese, St. Gregory, St. Leo) to become the new Lumen Christi in St. Paul, and completed their major building expansion.  Former Pastor of St. Therese, Deephaven and Associate at St. Patrick’s in Edina. 

(612) 317-3502

Recent Posts by Fr. John Bauer

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and past it into your browser. 
http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/021818.cfm 

This weekend we begin the season of Lent.   For the next six weeks, through our acts of prayer, fasting and almsgiving, we will try to show our desire to “repent and believe in the Gospel.”   Each year on the first Sunday of Lent, we always read one of the accounts of Jesus’ Temptation in the Desert.   This year we read Mark’s account.   Now since Mark’s was the first Gospel written and also the shortest, it doesn’t include the details that Matthew and Luke include in their Gospels.  Mark merely says:  “The Spirit drove Jesus out into the desert, and he remained in the desert for forty days, tempted by Satan.  He was among wild beasts and the angels ministered to him.”   The lack of details is not meant to minimize the reality of the temptations Jesus faced in the desert.   They were real and Jesus struggled with them.  For Mark, though, the important thing was not the temptations Jesus faced, but that fact that he overcame them and afterward began his public ministry by proclaiming: “This is the time of fulfillment.  The kingdom of God is at hand.  Repent and believe in the Gospel.”   

In each of our lives, we too face temptations, but because of Jesus, and the grace he offers us, we are can overcome them and follow the way of Jesus.  

Our first reading this weekend is from the Book of Genesis.   It takes place immediately after the story of the great flood.   The flood waters have receded and God establishes a covenant with his people.  We are told:  “This is the sign that I am giving for all ages to come, of the covenant between me and you and every living creature with you; I set my bow in the clouds to serve as a sign of the covenant between me and the earth.”   

Our second reading this weekend is taken from the first Letter of Saint Peter.    In this reading, Peter reminds us that the great flood “prefigured baptism, which saves you now.”  

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. While we all face temptations in our lives, some people seem to resist them more successfully than others.  Why do you think this is? 
  2. Where do you need to repent this Lent?
  3. I take great comfort in the fact that God has made a covenant with us.  At times, though, I also worry that I am not living up to my end of the covenant.   Have you ever felt this way?  

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. 
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/021118.cfm 

In our Gospel this weekend, we read the story of a healing of a leper.  Now at the time of Jesus, leprosy was a terrible curse.   It was a disfiguring and crippling disease.   There was no cure for it, and since people didn’t know how it was spread, lepers were forced to live apart from others in isolation and loneliness.   Thus, the leper in our Gospel today took a great risk in even approaching Jesus.   Yet we are told that “A leper came to Jesus and kneeling down begged him and said: ‘If you wish, you can make me clean.”    We are then told that “Moved with pity, he stretched out his hand, touched him and said to him, ‘I do will it.  Be made clean.’”   The leper was cleansed.  Jesus told him to tell no one and to go show himself to the priests so that they could certify that he was no longer a leper.    Instead of remaining quiet, however, the leper went off and began to “publicize the whole matter.” 

There are three things to note in this Gospel.  First, the leper came to Jesus in complete honesty and clear desperation.   He knew he needed Jesus, and his request conveyed his raw, naked need.  Second, Jesus knew the leper needed to be healed, but he also knew he lived apart and alone in isolation without any human contact.   I believe it is for this reason that Jesus stretched out his hand and touched him.   Jesus knew that he needed human contact as much as he needed to be healed.   Third, I believe the leper went and publicized his healing after Jesus told him to tell no one because he had been touched in a profound way by God’s grace.  When this has happened to us we just can’t keep it to ourselves.   

Our first reading this weekend provides the background for our Gospel.  It is taken from the Book of Leviticus and it details how lepers were to be dealt with.   They were to make their abode “outside of camp,” and they were to cry out “unclean, unclean” when someone approached.   To understand this treatment it is helpful to remember that at that time illness or hardship were believed to be the result of sin.  Something bad happened to you because you had sinned.   

In our second reading we continue to read from the first letter of Saint Paul to the Corinthians.  In the section we read today, Paul reminds people to “Be imitators of me, as I am of Christ.”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. Have you ever approached Jesus in prayer with the raw need of the leper?
  2. Jesus knew that the leper needed to be healed, but he also knew he desired simple human contact.   He offered the leper both.   Has Jesus ever given you something you didn’t realize you needed?   
  3. What is one concrete thing you can do to imitate Christ?                                   

                                                                 
Just after Christmas, I spent three days retreating and resting at the Guesthouse at Saint John’s Abbey. Staying at the Guesthouse is a wonderful experience. It is quiet and private. The rooms are simple, but very comfortable. The food, like the rooms, is simple but very tasty, and there are always options to choose from. Perhaps the aspect I like most about staying at the Guesthouse, though, is being able to take a short walk over to the Abbey Church to join the monks for prayer. Their usual schedule is: morning prayer at 7:00am, mid-day prayer at noon, Mass at 5:00pm, and evening prayer at 7:00pm. Now, with all the activities going on in a parish, it would be difficult to keep this rhythm in a parish setting. (I often find myself using my phone to pray evening prayer before a meeting.) This structure of prayer works well at the Abbey, though, and for retreatants especially it makes it easy to schedule other times for reading, private prayer, walks, and reflection. 
 
Now as much as I enjoy joining the monks for prayer, there is one drawback. As a diocesan priest we use a four volume Liturgy of the Hours. Two of the volumes are for Ordinary Time, and the other two are for the Advent/Christmas season and the Lent/Easter season. And the best part is that you only use one volume at a time. As importantly, it is very user friendly and easy to follow. 
 
On the other hand, the monks at Saint John’s have six books of psalms and scripture canticles, and three hymn books. And at any given prayer time you could be using four out of nine of those books for prayer. Fortunately, the monks always seem to be able to spot an inexperienced person shuffling though the various books trying to find the ones s/he will need for prayer. In these cases, one of the monks will come over and in a very kind and an uncondescending manner ask if they can help. Now just so you know, usually by day three I have learned to decipher the notations on the hymn board, and have gotten to know the various books well enough that I don’t look like such a rookie. It is great to know, though, that I only need to paste a confused look on my face and one of the monks will come and help me. 
 
There are times when we all could use some assistance. It could be with something relatively simple (like finding the right prayer book) or it could be with something more serious or important. As Christians, when we see someone in need our response is clear. 
 
Jesus has told us that we are to help those in need, simply because they are in need. The scene of the Last Judgment in Matthew’s Gospel reminds us of this. In that parable, Jesus has told us: “Whatsoever you did for the least of my brothers and sisters, you did for me” (Matthew 25:40).
 
Not only are we called to provide help and assistance to those in need, but this help is not contingent on whether we know and/or like the person, or think they are deserving of our assistance. Similarly, it is irrelevant whether they are close to us or at some distance. We are called to help people whenever we become aware that they are in need. As importantly, the assistance we provide needs to be concrete, specific, and practical, and not just good thoughts and kind words. 
 
Do we always do the above well? To be honest, I know I don’t. There are times when I put my own needs and wants ahead of those who need assistance. And there have been a few times when I turn a blind eye to those in need. There are other times, though, when I get it right. There are times when I respond to my neighbor in need spontaneously, generously and without reservation. I wish this were always the case, but my selfishness and sinfulness often get in the way of living as Christ has called me to live.  I am challenged though, by the example others set for me. And as importantly, I take comfort in the belief that God never calls us to do something God doesn’t give us the grace to do.  

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.
http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/020418.cfm 

Our Gospel for this weekend presents us with a “day in the life of Jesus.”  (Actually it is a day and a half.)    Jesus has left the synagogue (the setting of last weekend’s Gospel) and enters the house of Simon. There he healed Simon’s mother-in-law who was sick with a fever.   Toward evening they brought to him those who were ill or possessed by demons, whom he proceeded to cure.  

Early the next morning we are told that he went off before dawn to pray, and then the disciples found him he announced that he needed to go to the neighboring villages to preach and continue his ministry.  

Tucked into this Gospel is a sentence that is critically important, but which is not  elaborated on.   Specifically we are told that “Rising very early before dawn, he left and went off to a deserted place where he prayed.”  For Jesus prayer was a ”sine quo non” of his ministry.   In his communing with God the Father in prayer, Jesus found strength and encouragement for his ministry.   This is a good model for us and suggests that prayer is essential to our lives and not an adjunct to our lives.   

Our first reading for this weekend is from the book of Job.   As I have mentioned previously, when the lectionary was put together, it was decided that the first reading and the Gospel each weekend would share a similar theme, while the second reading would usually be a continuous reading from one of the letters of Paul, Peter or John.    While it is difficult to discern the theme that links our first reading and Gospel for this weekend, I think it has to do with the idea that ultimately God alone is the source of our life and happiness.  

In our second reading today we continue to read from Paul’s first letter to the Corinthians.  In this reading we Paul reminds the Corinthians that all he does he does for “the sake of the Gospel” so that he too might have a share in it.  

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. I used to find that the late afternoon was the best time for me to prayer.  The past few years, though, I have found that mornings work much better.   What is the best time for you to pray?   
  2. What helps your prayer, and what hinders you from praying as Jesus prayed?
  3. Paul talks about having an obligation to preach the Gospel.  Has there been a time when you felt an obligation to preach the Gospel or to give witness to it?  

 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/012818.cfm    

I suspect we all know people who could be described as “windbags.”  These people talk a lot, but say very little.  On the other hand, we all probably know individuals who, when they talk, people listen.  They speak with a wisdom and authority that causes us to take them seriously.  Twice in this Sunday’s Gospel we are told that the people were “astonished” and “amazed” at Jesus’ teaching because he taught with “authority.”   What this suggests is that when Jesus spoke or taught people, listened because inherently they knew that his words were not mere opinion, but had a depth and power to them.   

Tucked in between the people’s words of astonishment at Jesus’ teaching is the encounter between Jesus and a man with an unclean spirit.   The unclean spirit recognized Jesus, but Jesus rebuked him and said: “’Quiet! Come out of him!’  The unclean spirit convulsed him and with a loud cry came out of him.”    The exorcism of the unclean spirit helped to demonstrate Jesus’ power and authority.  

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of Deuteronomy.   In it Moses tells the people “A prophet like me will the Lord, your God, raise up for you from among your own kin; to him you shall listen.”   In the Old Testament God communicated with God’s people through the prophets.  In the New Testament, God spoke to God’s people through Jesus Christ.   Jesus, though, was not just another prophet.  He was and is the Word of God given form and flesh and spoken into our world and our individual lives. 

Our second reading this weekend is taken from the first letter of Saint Paul to the Corinthians.    Like the section we read last weekend, this weekend’s reading seems to anticipate the imminent return of Christ.  Given this, Paul tells people he would like them to be “free of anxieties” so they can adhere to the Lord “without distraction.”

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. When have you encountered someone who spoke with authority?  How did you feel when you heard their words? 
  2. Have you ever felt the words of Scripture speaking to you with authority?
  3. What anxieties do you need to be freed from?   

Pages