Fr. John Bauer

Rector and Pastor
Clergy

Serves on the Parish Council, Finance Committee, Stewardship Council and as a member of The Basilica Landmark Board.  Fr. Bauer led the successful merger of 3 parishes (St.Therese, St. Gregory, St. Leo) to become the new Lumen Christi in St. Paul, and completed their major building expansion.  Former Pastor of St. Therese, Deephaven and Associate at St. Patrick’s in Edina. 

(612) 317-3502

Recent Posts by Fr. John Bauer

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. 
https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/032518.cfm 

Each year on Palm Sunday we read an account of Jesus’ passion from one of the Synoptic Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke).  This year we read from the Gospel of Mark.     In place of the customary introduction to the Gospel:  “A reading from the Holy Gospel according to ………..”   the passion is introduced with the stark:  “The passion of our Lord Jesus Christ according to ……….”   This change may seem slight or even trivial, but it reminds us of the significance of the story we are about to hear and which will unfold for us during Holy Week.       

Mark’s account of the passion is the shortest of all four Gospels.   At the same time, some scripture scholars claim that Mark’s account of the passion emphasizes the humanity of Jesus the best.   It is not that Mark forgets the divinity of Jesus; rather Mark doesn’t try to “dress up” the emotions Jesus --- and others --- were feeling.   

While we are all familiar with the story of Jesus’ passion, reading (or hearing) it in its entirety can help us appreciate anew, and hopefully at a deeper level the suffering Jesus’ endured for our sake.  

The first and second readings for Palm Sunday remain the same every year.   The first reading is taken from that part of Isaiah known as the “songs of the suffering servant.”   From the earliest days of the Church, Christians have seen these songs as referring to Christ, the suffering servant par excellence.  

The second reading for Palm Sunday is taken from Paul’s letter to the Philippians.  It is in the form of a hymn and it speaks of Jesus’ journey from heaven to earth and back to heaven.  Its simple eloquence reminds us that Jesus “emptied himself, taking the form of a slave” for us.   And because of this, “every knee shall bend in heaven and on earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord………..”  

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. I suspect that for many people the “cross” is more ornamentation than symbol of Christ’s suffering and death.   Do you agree or disagree? 
  2. What part of Jesus’ passion and death is most disturbing for you?
  3. Can you think of a time when you “emptied” yourself for another?   

 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. 
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/031818-year-b.cfm  

“Sir, we would like to see Jesus.”  This request was made to Philip by “Some Greeks” at the beginning of this Sunday’s Gospel.   After learning of their request Jesus didn’t respond directly.  Instead he said: “Whoever loves his life loses it, and whoever hates his life in this world will preserve it for eternal life.”   He then went on to talk about the hour which was coming, and this being the purpose for which he came.    He then prayed: “Father, glorify you name.”   We are then told that a voice came from heaven saying: “I have glorified it and will glorify it again.”   Jesus then told the people:  “This voice did not come for my sake, but for yours.  Now is the time of judgment on this world;  now the ruler of this world will be driven out.  And when I am lifted up from the earth, I will draw everyone to myself”   

Now given the above, this Gospel would seem to be a bit disjointed, without a logical progression of thought.   The thread that ties this passage together, though, is found in the question posed by the Greeks: “Sir, we would like to see Jesus.”   Often times in the scriptures, people want to “see” Jesus.  They are comfortable seeing him from a distance.  Jesus, though, is clear he doesn’t want people to stay at a distance from him.  He wants them to follow him.  And if they chose to follow him, he also wants them to come to know him.  Jesus is also clear, though, that knowing him won’t guarantee a life of ease, or a life free of difficulties or trials.  Rather his followers are to give up their way, and follow his way.   In this regard, in our Gospel today Jesus is clear; “Whoever serves me must follow me, and where I am there also will my servant be.  The Father will honor whoever serves me.” 

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of the Prophet Jeremiah.   In it God tells the people that because their forbearers broke the old covenant, He will make a “new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah.”   The terms of the covenant are stated clearly.   “I will place my law within them and write it upon their hearts; I will be their God, and they shall be my people.”  

In our second reading this Sunday the author of the Letter to the Hebrews reminds the people that Jesus, “Son though he was, he learned obedience from what he suffered, and when he was made perfect, he became the source of eternal salvation for all who obey him.”  

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:  

1.  The request of the Greeks: “Sir, we would like to see Jesus.” suggests to me that often we want to stay at a distance from Jesus.   As a friend of mine puts it: “at times we more admire than strive to imitate Jesus.”    Do you agree or disagree? 

2.  In the first reading God told the people of Israel that He was making a new covenant with them.  What does the word “covenant” mean to you?

3.   What does it mean for you to “obey” Jesus?  

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. http://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/031118-year-b.cfm 
 
When the camera scans the crowd at football or baseball games, often times there will be at least one person in the crowd holding up a sign that reads:  John 3:16 “For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish, but might have eternal life.”   These words, taken from this weekend’s Gospel, remind us that our God loves us so much that God gave form and flesh to that love in the human person of Jesus Christ.   More than this, though, God’s love is so great that God wants to share that love with us not just in this life, but in eternal life.   This love is offered to us freely, completely and without hesitation or qualificaiton.  It is a love that is beyond belief and without reason.  
 
I believe the message of God’s undeserved, unending and immeasurable love for us is one that we can’t hear too often.   I say this because there are many people who want to limit the embrace of God’s love to a chosen few, or who would have you believe that somehow we need to earn God’s love.   Both of these ideas are fundamentally wrong.  God loves us as we are, simply because we are.   There are no limits to God’s love.   And the only barrier to God’s love is the hardness of our own hearts.  God never forces God’s love on us.   It is offered freely and willingly.   We only have to accept it.   And whoever accepts God’s love does the works of God and is given the promise of eternal life.   
 
Our first reading this weekend is taken from the second Book of Chronicles.  It tells how the priests and the people of Judah had turned away from God, despite the fact that “Early and often did the Lord, the God of their fathers, send his messengers to them, for he had compassion on his people and his dwelling place.”  Because of their infidelity, God allowed them to be conquered and led into captivity in Babylon.   
 
Our second reading this weekend is taken from the Letter of Saint Paul to the Ephesians.   In it Paul reminds the Ephesians, and us, that God is rich in mercy and that “by grace you have been saved through faith, and this is not from you; it is the gift of God; it is not from works, so no one may boast.”   
 
Questions for Reflection/Discussion:
  1. When have you felt God’s love in your life?
  2. When have you refused to accept and live in God’s love?
  3. What would you say to someone who tried to tell you that you that God’s love was limited to a chosen few, or that you had to earn God’s love. 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.
http://usccb.org/bible/readings/030418-year-b.cfm     

Our Church has always taught that Jesus is true God and true man.  In this Sunday’s Gospel --- the familiar story of the cleansing of the temple --- we get a glimpse into Jesus’ humanity.  We are told that Jesus “found in the temple area those who sold oxen, sheep and doves, as well as the money changers seated there.  He made a whip out of cords and drove them all out of the temple area, with the sheep and oxen, and spilled the coins of the money changers and overturned their tables, and to those who sold doves he said, ‘Take these out of here and stop making my Father’s house a marketplace.’”   

In addition to being a good example of Jesus’ humanity, what are we to make of this incident?   First, it would be wrong to use this incident to justify our own outbursts of anger.  I say this because Jesus’ anger was directed at a situation, not a person.  It was not hurtful or vengeful.  It was very controlled, specific and limited in duration.  And its purpose was not to offend or put down.   Rather, the point and purpose of Jesus’ anger was to call people back to the reason they came to the temple.  The temple was not a place to conduct business; rather it was a place where people could worship and attend to their relationship with God.   Jesus’ anger reminded them (and us) of this fundamental truth.   

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of Exodus.  It is the story of God giving the Ten Commandments to the Israelites.  And as we all know, the third commandment is “Remember to keep holy the Sabbath day.”  Clearly the people in today’s Gospel were not heedful of this commandment.   

Our second reading this Sunday is taken from the first letter of Saint Paul to the Corinthians.  In blunt and stark terms, Paul reminds us that “Jews demand signs and Greeks look for wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are called, Jews and Greeks alike, Christ is the power of God and the wisdom of God.”    

Questions for Reflection/Discussion: 

  1. Have you ever used Jesus’ display of anger to justify your own anger?
  2. How do you keep holy the Sabbath day? 
  3. I suspect that for people who don’t come from a Christian background, the idea of a crucified Savior could be a stumbling block.  How would you explain Jesus’ crucifixion to a non-Christian?  

 

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/022518.cfm 
 
Each year on the 2nd Sunday of Lent we read one of the accounts of the Transfiguration of Christ.   The various parts of the story are well known.  Jesus led Peter, James and John “ up a high mountain,” his “clothes became dazzling white,” then Elijah appeared to them along with Moses, and they were “conversing with Jesus.”   Peter announced “it is good that we are here,” then a cloud overshadowed them and from the cloud came a voice proclaiming: “This is my beloved Son.  Listen to him.”   After the experience Jesus charged them not to tell anyone what they had seen “except when the Son of Man had risen from the dead.”   
 
All these various details are important.  The high mountain and the dazzling garments suggest the presence of God.   Moses and Elijah represented the law and the prophets, the two most important elements of Judaism.  The voice from heaven affirms that it was a divine experience.  And the admonition not to tell anyone until the Son of Man had risen from the dead was meant to incite hope in the disciples that the glory that was revealed in Jesus would also be his after his death.    
 
I believe that in each of our lives, we have “transfiguring” moments ----- certainly not as profound or as deep as the transfiguration the disciples experienced -----  but moments nonetheless when we experience God’s presence and grace --- God’s love and life.  They give us hope in the face of life’s pain.  They help us believe that if we hold on to God, God will hold on to us.   This was Paul’s message in our second reading this Sunday from the Letter to the Romans.  In that reading Paul is clear:  “If God is for us, who can be against us?”  
 
Our first reading this Sunday is taken the Book of Genesis.   It is the story of God putting Abraham to the test by asking him to offer his only son, Isaac, as a holocaust.   While the story is grim, the point is that at times God can ask much of us, but the God who calls us also gives us the grace and strength to respond to that call.   
 
Our second readning this Sunday is from St. Paul's letter to the Romans.   In the opening sentence Paul reminds us of a basic tenent of our faith.  "Brothers and sisters:  If God is for us, who can be against us?"
 
Questions for Reflection/Discussion:
 
  1. When have you had a “transfiguring” moment in your life? 
  2. In what way has the grace of that moment helped you to face any difficult situations you encountered later in life?
  3. When have you felt God asking you to do something difficult or something you didn’t want to do?  

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