Fr. John Bauer

Rector and Pastor
Clergy

Serves on the Parish Council, Finance Committee, Stewardship Council and as a member of The Basilica Landmark Board.  Fr. Bauer led the successful merger of 3 parishes (St.Therese, St. Gregory, St. Leo) to become the new Lumen Christi in St. Paul, and completed their major building expansion.  Former Pastor of St. Therese, Deephaven and Associate at St. Patrick’s in Edina. 

(612) 317-3502

Recent Posts by Fr. John Bauer

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/082017.cfm  

Our Gospel this weekend presents us with what --- at least initially --- looks like an unflattering picture of Jesus.   We are told that a Canaanite woman came to Jesus and called out:  “Have pity on me, Lord, Son of David! My daughter is tormented by a demon.”   We are told, though, that Jesus “did not say a word in answer to her.”    Jesus’ disciples want him to send her away.  Jesus told them, though:  “I was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel.”   But the woman “came and did Jesus homage, saying Lord, help me.”  Jesus tried to brush her off with the rather abrupt response that: “It is not right to take the food of the children and throw it to the dogs.”   In reply the woman said: “Please, Lord, for even the dogs eat the scraps that fall from the table of their masters.”   Jesus responded to her by telling her:  “O woman, great is your faith!  Let it be done for you as you wish.”     

What are we to make of this strange conversation?   First, it must be noted that historically Jews had little to do with Canaanites.   Jesus’ response, then, would have been in line with the spirit of the times.  Second, while eventually Jesus commissioned and sent his disciples to preach the Gospel to all nations, initially he thought their mission should begin with the Jews.  Thirdly, though, and perhaps most importantly, Jesus, as he does elsewhere in the Gospels, responded to the woman’s obvious faith.   It is the woman’s faith that is the most important element in this Gospel. 

Our first reading this weekend is taken from the Book of the Prophet Isaiah.   It shares the theme of the Gospel.  In it Isaiah prophesizes:  “The foreigners who join themselves to the Lord ………. All who keep the Sabbath free from profanation and hold to my covenant, them I will bring to my holy mountain and make joyful in my house of prayer………. for my house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples.”    

For our second reading this weekend, we continue to read from the Letter of Saint Paul to the Romans. 
In this section, Paul, while identifying himself as the “apostle to the Gentiles,” also preaches to his fellow Jews and reminds them that “the gifts and call of God are irrevocable.” 

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:    

  1. When you have prayed about something, have you ever felt that initially your prayer was rebuffed?    
  2. Has your faith ever drawn you to deeper prayer? 
  3. If God wants God’s house to be a house of prayer for all peoples, why do some want to limit access?    
For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser. https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/081317.cfm  
 
Having once been in a boat when a storm suddenly came up, you can perhaps understand why, whenever I’m on a boat, I always make sure there are enough life jackets to go around and that one is  within arm’s reach.  Given this experience, I also have a great deal of sympathy for the disciples in our Gospel this weekend.   We are told that after Jesus had fed the people, he “made the disciples get into a boat and precede him to the other side.”   Unfortunately a storm came up and the boat “was being tossed about by the waves, for the wind was against it.”  Suddenly Jesus came walking toward them, but “when the disciples saw him walking on the sea they were terrified.  ‘It is a ghost,’ they said, and they cried out in fear.”  Jesus identified himself and told them not to be afraid.  Peter, though, said: “Lord, if it is you, command me to come to you on the water.”  Jesus said “Come.”   Unfortunately, no sooner had Peter started walking on the water than he began to sink like a stone.  He cried out to Jesus who “stretched out his hand and caught Peter.”   After they had got into the boat the wind died down.   The disciples then did Jesus homage saying: “Truly, you are the Son of God.”   
 
Not being a very strong swimmer, I can understand the disciples’ panic in the face of the storm at sea.   It is interesting, though, that their fear continued even when they saw Jesus walking toward them on the water.  And ultimately it was only when Jesus got in the boat with them that the storm ceased and their fear ended.  This suggests to me that perhaps if we invited Jesus into our lives more often we would be less fearful and bolder in our efforts at living our faith.
 
Our first reading this weekend is taken from the first Book of Kings.   In it Elijah is on Mount Horeb and God said to him; “Go outside and stand on the mountain before the Lord; the Lord will be passing by.”  Elijah did not find God in the strong wind, or an earthquake, or in fire, but rather in a “tiny whispering sound.”   Along with the Gospel, this story reminds us that God is sometimes found in places we wouldn’t expect. 
 
Our second reading this weekend is again taken from the Letter of St. Paul to the Romans.  In it Paul laments over those who refuse to accept the Gospel. 
 
Questions for Reflection/Discussion:
  1. In the Gospel and in the first reading for this weekend God is found in unexpected places.  Where have you found God’s unexpected presence in your life? 
  2. Has there been a time when you were afraid or fearful, and then suddenly realized God’s presence? 
  3. Paul lamented that some people had refused to accept the Gospel.  What would you say to someone who had rejected the Gospel?  
 
 

A few weeks ago I spent my day off with another priest. For lunch we bought some sandwiches and beverages, and found a park where we had an informal picnic. A few yards away from us, two small children were having a great time playing on the grass, laughing, and enjoying each other. I assumed they were related or that their parents were friends. At one point, though, their mothers came to collect them, and when they arrived at the spot where the boys were playing, they introduced themselves to each another. I was surprised that they didn’t know each other, and that the boys weren’t friends or relatives. It then occurred to me that such is the innocence of youth. When we are young, we don’t have a lot of preconceived ideas about others. We don’t have to know much about them to interact with them and enjoy their company. 

As we move along the road of life, though, at some point things change. We move from a childlike openness to people we don’t know, to being suspicious of them and/or their motives. On the one hand, there is some merit to this. If we naively assume that everyone is good and kind and nice, we are going to be disappointed, and even hurt. On the other hand, though, when we lose an openness to others, we can fail to see them as God sees them—as a beloved son or daughter. 

It seems to me that we need to strike a balance between these two approaches. More importantly, in trying to find this balance we need to be willing to err on the side of love. In our world today there is much that can cause us to be suspicious and even anxious. And sometimes without even realizing it, and without it becoming a conscious choice, these feelings can move into animosity and hatred. At these times, we need to remember that in the parable of the last judgement, (Mt. 25:31-46) Jesus taught us that He is to be found in every encounter we have with the poor, the sick, the imprisoned, the needy, the stranger, and the forgotten. We may not recognize him, but he is there. 

Recognizing the presence of Christ in others is a challenge. In my own life I fail at it more often than I succeed. We need to remember, though, that God created us in God’s image and likeness, and because of this, we are all beloved sons and daughters of God—no exceptions, no exclusions, no omissions. If we allow ourselves to be guided by our better angels and if we are open to God’s grace, I believe we are more apt to recognize the presence of Christ in one another. And if we are able to do this with others, maybe, just maybe, others might recognize the presence of Christ in us.

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  
 
This Sunday we celebrate the Feast of the Transfiguration of the Lord.  This Feast, which falls on August 6th, supplants the 18th Sunday in Ordinary Time.    Matthew, Mark and Luke all include the account of the Transfiguration in their Gospels.  The main outline of the story is the same in all three of these Gospels.  In each account, Jesus and three of his apostles, Peter, James and John, go to a mountain (the Mount of the Transfiguration.)   On the mountain, Jesus is transfigured before their eyes, his face changed and his clothes became dazzlingly white.  Then Moses and the prophet Elijah appeared next to him and he conversed with them.  Jesus is then called “Son” by a voice in the sky, assumed to be God the Father, as at the Baptism of Jesus.   In Matthew and Mark’s account, Jesus then told his disciples not to tell anyone about the experience “until the Son of Man has been raised from the dead.”  
 
For Peter, James and John, the Transfiguration was a glimpse of the glory that awaited them.   And while the experience of the Transfiguration was unique to them, I believe we all have had or will have “transfiguring moments” in our lives.   These are brief, fleeting moments of God’s grace where we get a glimpse of something “more” or something “beyond” ourselves.   These moments do not occur at our initiative, and are not under our control.   They are gifts from God, and like Peter, while we might want to prolong or stay in these moments, we cannot.  Rather, they are meant to give us hope for the journey and confidence that despite any pain and hardship we might experience in the present --- if we remain steadfast in our faith --- ultimately we will share in the glory of God.    
 
Our first reading for this Feast of the Transfiguration, is taken from the Book of the Prophet Daniel.  We don’t often read from this book.   It is Apocalyptic literature which uses highly stylized and symbolic language to make the point that despite any troubles in the present moment, ultimately there will be a time of vindication.  
 
Our second reading for this Feast is taken from the second Letter of Saint Peter.  In the section we read today Peter reminds us:  “………. we had been eyewitnesses of his majesty.  For he received honor and glory from God the Father when that unique declaration came to him from the majestic glory, “This is my Son, my beloved, with whom I am well pleased.”    
 
Questions for Reflection and/or Discussion:
 
  1. When have you experienced a “transfiguring moment” in your life?
  2. What do you remember most from this experience?  
  3. Apocalyptic literature is not meant to be taken literally. It is special type of literature that uses exaggerated, symbolic language to make a particular point. Have you ever read this kind of literature other than in the Bible?   

For this Sunday’s readings, click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  https://www.usccb.org/bible/readings/073017.cfm    

Many years ago, after my mother died, we met as a family to share some of her personal items.  There were no disagreements until we came to the crockery bowl in which my mother used to make bread.   We all wanted it.   Now certainly it wasn’t because the bowl had any monetary value.  Rather, we all wanted it, because of its sentimental value.  It reminded us not just of my mother’s bread baking skills, but also of her love for us.  After discussing it, we decided that my sister --- the only one who lived in our home town of Anoka --- would get the bowl.   To this day, though, I still cast a jealous eye on it whenever I visit my sister.  

I would guess there are things in each of our lives that are very important to us.  These things could have great monetary value, or they could be important simply because of what they represent.   In either case, they are valuable to us and it is important that we have them.   Our Gospel for this weekend contains two parables that both speak about things that have value --- a treasure buried in a field and a pearl of great price.   In both cases the individuals who discovered them sold all they had to possess them. Now, as with all parables, this one is not meant to be taken literally.  Rather, it reminds us that some things are worth possessing regardless of the cost.    This is particularly true with regard to the Kingdom of God.   The parable invites us to do all that we can to take hold of that kingdom when it is offered to us.     

Our first reading this weekend is taken from the first Book of Kings.  In it God appeared to Solomon in a dream and said:  “Ask something of me and I will give it to you.”   Solomon did not ask for a long life or riches, or the life of his enemies.  Instead he asked for an “understanding heart to judge your people and to distinguish right from wrong.”    In asking for wisdom Solomon clearly knew what was important and necessary.   

Our second reading this weekend is again taken from the Letter of St. Paul to the Romans.   In it Paul reminds us that “all things work for good for those who love God.”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. In your life, is there a “pearl of great price”
  2. Have you ever pursued something and then were disappointed when you got it?   
  3. If God appeared to you and said “ask something of me and I will give it to you,” what would you ask for? 

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