Fr. John Bauer

Rector and Pastor
Clergy

Serves on the Parish Council, Finance Committee, Stewardship Council and as a member of The Basilica Landmark Board.  Fr. Bauer led the successful merger of 3 parishes (St.Therese, St. Gregory, St. Leo) to become the new Lumen Christi in St. Paul, and completed their major building expansion.  Former Pastor of St. Therese, Deephaven and Associate at St. Patrick’s in Edina. 

(612) 317-3502

Recent Posts by Fr. John Bauer

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste in into your browser. http://usccb.org/bible/readings/102719.cfm 

In our Gospel this weekend Jesus addressed a parable to "those who were convinced of their own righteousness and despised everyone else.”  The parable begins:  “two men who went up to the temple to pray:  one was a Pharisee, the other a tax collector.”  We are told that the Pharisee  “Spoke this prayer to himself.  ‘O God, I thank you that I am not like the rest of humanity  --- greedy, dishonest,  adulterous --- or even like this tax collector.   I fast twice a week.  I pay tithes on my whole income.’”    The tax collector, though, “stood off at a  distance, and would not even raise his eyes to heaven, but beat his breast and prayed, ‘O God, be merciful to me a sinner.’”  

The difference between these two people in terms of their prayer is striking.   The Pharisee was not so much praying as he was giving a report on his “supposed” goodness.  The tax collector, though, had a clear since of his own sinfulness and his need for God’s mercy.   His prayer was honest and heartfelt.  

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of Sirach.   It shares the theme of our Gospel in regard to prayer.   It is clear that “The prayer of the lowly pierces the clouds, it does not rest till it reaches its goal.”   

In our second reading this Sunday, we continue to read from the second Letter of St. Paul to Timothy.   In it Paul writes very personally about feeling abandoned by those who whose support he had anticipated.   He also is clear, though, about his trust in God: “The Lord will rescue me from every evil threat and will bring me safe to his heavenly kingdom.  To him be glory forever and ever.  Amen.” 
Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. I don’t think many of us pray as the Pharisee did in our Gospel for this weekend.  (Few of us are that grandiose.)   I also don’t think that many of us pray as the tax collector did.  (Few of us are that honest.)   How do you approach God in prayer?
  2. How do you know when God has heard your prayer?
  3. Even though he felt abandoned, Paul was sure of God’s presence and grace.  Have you ever experienced God’s grace at a time when you have felt abandoned or betrayed.?    

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste in into your browser.

http://usccb.org/bible/readings/102019.cfm

 

This Sunday we celebrate the 29th Sunday in Ordinary Time.   In our Gospel this Sunday we read the parable of the unjust judge.  This parable is unique to Luke.   It is introduced with the words:  “Jesus told his disciples a parable about the necessity for them to pray always.”   He then tells the story of a widow who continually comes to an unjust judge demanding her rights.    Eventually the judge said to himeself:  “While it is true that I neither fear God nor respect any human being, because this widow keeps bothering me I shall deliver a just decision for her lest she finally come and strike me.”   

 

Our first reading this Sunday is taken from the Book of Exodus.   It tells the story of a battle between the forces of Amalek and those of Israel.   During the battle: “As long as Moses kept his hands raised up, Israel had the better of the fight, but when he let his hands rest, Amalek had the better of the fight.”   So “Aaron and Hur supported his hands, one on one side and one on the other, so this hands remained steady till sunset.” 

 

The Gospel and the first reading together remind us of two essential elements of prayer:  1. persistence; and 2. the support of others.   At times it is easy to become discouraged in prayer.   The support of others, though, can help us persevere in prayer. We persevere in prayer, though, not to change God’s mind, but to discern how God might be responding to our prayer. 

 

In our second reading this Sunday we continue to read from the second Letter of St. Paul to Timothy.   In it Paul urges Timothy to “proclaim the word; be persistent whether it is convenient or inconvenient; convince, reprimand, encourage through all patience and teaching.”    

 

 

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

 

 

1.  Has there been a time when you have been discouraged in prayer?  What helped you to persist?

 

2.  When have others been helpful to you in your spiritual life?

 

3.  Are you persistent in prayer whether it is convenient or inconvenient?   

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  http://usccb.org/bible/readings/101319.cfm  

The Gospel and our first reading this Sunday deal with the healing of lepers.   In the Gospel, ten lepers meet Jesus as he is entering a village.  “They stood at a distance from him and raised their voices, saying, ‘Jesus, Master! Have pity on us!’”    Jesus told them “Go show yourselves to the priests.”    They set off “And one of them, realizing he had been healed, returned, glorifying God in a loud voice, and he fell at the feet of Jesus and thanked him.  He was a Samaritan.”    In response, Jesus wondered aloud where the other nine were.   Then he said to the one leper who returned, “Stand up and go; your faith has saved you.”   

In the first reading Naaman, the army commander of the king of Aram, is cured of his leprosy.   He asked if he could give a gift to Elisha for his cure, but Elisha declined the offer.    In response Naaman said:  “If you will not accept, please let me, your servant, have two mule-loads of earth, for I will not longer offer holocaust or sacrifice to any other god except to the Lord.”   

The message of both these readings is clear.  When we realize that God has touched our lives, it should change us.   The challenge, of course, is to realize when God has touched our lives, and then to be open to God’s grace changing our lives.   

In our second reading this Sunday we continue to read from the second Letter of St. Paul to Timothy.    Paul is suffering for the Gospel “even to the point of chains, like a criminal.”   But he reminds Timothy that “the word of God is not chained.”   And it is the word of God that brings us salvation in Christ Jesus.   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. Have there been times/moments when you have felt God touch your life?                       
  2. Why do you think only one leper came back to thank Jesus?
  3. Paul suffered because he preached the Gospel.  Have you ever suffered any repercussions because of your beliefs?

A few years ago some friends of mine moved their dining room table and chairs into their living room and their living room furniture into their dining room.  Putting the dining room table in the living room allowed them to accommodate a larger crowd for family dinners, especially when their children got married and started having children of their own. Since it has been this way for a few years, I suspect this is a long term arrangement. Now to be honest, this arrangement works quite well. They have a large family room off the kitchen, and with the former dining room being adjacent to the kitchen, people can easily talk and visit while a meal is being prepared, and then eat dinner without being crowded.

Now, I have to admit that at first I was a little tentative in regard to my friends’ shifting their dining room and living room. In the years since they did it, however, I have come to understand the wisdom of their thinking.  The meals I’ve shared at that table are always very enjoyable, with great humor, good food, good companionship, and lots of elbow room. And if we began to feel a little crowded at the table they could just put in another leaf, and there was always room for more. 

In reflecting on my friends’ decision to move their dining room table into the living room, it seems to me that it is a real metaphor for what church is all about: It reminds us that there is always room for more at the table of the Lord.  Church is (or should be) a place where all are welcome—no exceptions, no limitations, no exclusions.  The embrace of our Church can be no less than the embrace of our God’s love. 

Jesus was always very clear about the expanse of God’s love. We are told that he dined with sinners and tax collectors.  Moreover Jesus was even known to invite himself to someone’s house for dinner. And of course, there was also that occasion when a woman known to be a sinner, burst into the middle of dinner and washed Jesus feet with her tears and dried them when her hair. I believe that in sharing a meal with anyone and everyone Jesus was sending the clear message that God’s love is extended to everyone, and that there was always room for more at the table of the Lord.  

As someone who by necessity often eats alone, I really enjoy those occasions when I can share a meal with others. I especially appreciate when the table is filled, and the laughter and love flow freely. For me this is a wonderful image of the table of the Lord— where the table is large enough so that there is always room for more.  

For this Sunday’s readings click on the link below or copy and paste it into your browser.  http://usccb.org/bible/readings/100619.cfm 

The theme of faith runs through all three readings this weekend.   

The Gospel this weekend comes in two sections.   In the first section the disciples ask Jesus to “Increase our Faith.”  Jesus replied:  “If you have faith the size of a mustard see, you would say to this mulberry tree, ‘Be uprooted and planted in the sea,’ and it would obey you.”   In the second section of the Gospel Jesus, used the imagery of a servant and master, to remind us that:  “When you have done all you have been commanded, say, ‘We are unprofitable servants;  we have done what we were obligated to do.’”   Both of these sections deserve comment.   

For those who have never seen a mustard seed, it is indeed a very small seed.   Several years ago at another parish we gave out mustard seeds at the beginning of summer and invited parishioners to plant them and bring them back at the end of summer to see how big they had grown.   The seeds were so small that volunteers who taped them to 3 X 5 index cards complained that they nearly went blind doing so.   Yet, Jesus is clear that if we had faith the size of a small mustard seed, great things could happen.   

Jesus is also clear that God is not obligated to do things for us, or to give us heaven.  Out of love for us, God has established us in this world and given us charge over it.   Our task, our obligation is to respond in love to God and do what God has commanded.  If we do this, then God will respond to us in love, not out of obligation.   Being a faithful disciple does not obligate God to do things for us.   God does all that God does out of love for us.   

Our first reading this weekend is taken from the Book of the Prophet Habakkuk.  In it the prophet laments God’s silence in the face of violence, ruin, misery, strife and discord.  God responded clearly and forthrightly.  “For the vision still has its time, presses on to fulfillment, and will not disappoint, if it delays, wait for it, it will surely come, it will not be late.”   This reminds us that God is working even when we are not aware of it.   We are called to wait patiently and in trust.  This is part of what faith is all about. 

Our second reading this weekend is taken from the second Letter of St. Paul to Timothy.   In it Paul reminds Timothy (and us) that we are called to persevere in faith in the face of adversity “with the strength that comes from God.”   

Questions for Reflection/Discussion:

  1. What does having faith mean to you?
  2. How do you persevere in faith in the face of adversity or hardship? 
  3. What would you say to someone who feels God is silent in the face of their prayer?      

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